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Full text of "Haverford College Bulletin, New Series, 42-43, 1943-1945"

CLASS L-D ^^O^BOOkJJI 

THE LIBRARY 

OF 

HAVERFORD COLLEGE 



THE GIFT OF 

HAVERK)KD COLLSGE 

ACCESSION NO. I I O \ I O 



Digitized by tine Internet Arciiive 

in 2011 witii funding from 

LYRASIS IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/haverfordcollege4243have 



No 2k.tln\e.t(o nu^mb^r pu-bh'sKcci 

HAVERFORD COLLEGE DIRECTORY 1943-44 
DECEMBER, 1943 



NOL. KLll ^^0. 1 

FACULTY, OFFICERS, ETC. 

Telephone 

(Ardmore Exchange 

Name Address unless otherwise noted) 

Allendoerfer, Carl B. 750 Rugby Rd., Bryn Mawr B.M. 2568J 

Asensio, Manuel J. 2 College Lane 9163 

Babbitt, Dr. James A. Tunbridge & Blakely Rds 7950 

Benham, T. A. 791 College Ave 6044 

Bemheimer, Richard M 225 Roberts Rd., Bryn Mawr....B.M. 1427W 

Caselli, Aldo 605 Railroad Ave. 1132 

Chamberlin, William Henry .22 Holden St., Cambridge, Mass 

Comfort, Howard 5 College Circle 3732 

Comfort, William W South Walton Rd 0455 

Dodson, Leonidas 213 St. Marks Sq., Phila.-.EVergreen 5028 

Drake, Thomas K 702 Pennstone Rd., Bryn Mawr B.M. 1534 

Evans, Arlington 324 Boulevard, Brookline, Upper 

Darby, Pa Hilltop 2043 

Evans, Francis Cope 1 College Lane 4049W 

FitzGerald, Alan S Warick Rd. and Cotswold Lane, 

Wynnewood 1404 

Flight, John W 753 College Ave 4409W 

Foss, Martin 824 Buck Lane 1599 

Frey, William T. 428 Haverford Rd., Wynnewood 7903J 

Gibb, Thomas C 518 W. Beechtree Ln., Wayne.-Wayne 1469W 

Green, Louis C 791 College Ave 4409J 

Gummere, Henry V 3026 Midvale Ave., Phila., 29 

Tennessee 1933 

Haddleton, A. W. 29 Tenmore Rd. B.M. 1235W 

Henry, Howard K. 1464 Drayton Lane, Penn Wynne... 3923J 

Hepp, Maylon H Sugartown Rd. at Poplar Ave., 

Devon Wayne 0373M 

Herndon, John G. 1 College Lane.... 0364 

Hetzel, Theodore B 768 College Ave 4393W 

Holmes, Clayton W. 720 Millbrook Lane 4269W 

Johnston, Robert J. Woodside Cottage 3725 

Jones, Rufus M 2 College Circle 2777 

Jones, Thomas 521 Panmure Rd. (Science House).... 6769W 

Kelly, John A. 3 College Lane 4160 

Kikuchi, Chihiro Founders Hall, East 9460 

Kirk, David B. Founders Hall, East 9460 

Kraus, Alois 11 Elliott Ave., Bryn Mawr B.M. 9277 

Laflford, Mrs. Xindsay 1-A College Lane 5479W 



LD ZZO(, 

4/ n ^ Telephone 

s/ "* (Ardmore Exchange 

Name Address unless otherwise noted) 

LaFleur, Albert A. 819 Montgomery Av., B. Mawr..B.M. 1502R 

LeGalley, Donald P. 1109 Yeadon Ave., Yeadon.... Madison 8555W 

Lockwood, Dean P. 6 College Circle 1402J 

Lograsso, Angeline College Inn, Bryn Mawr B.M. 9296 

Lunt, William E. 5 College Lane 1507W 

Macintosh, Archibald 3 College Circle 0961 

Meldrum, William B 747 College Ave 0881J 

Morley, Felix 1 College Circle .. 4712 

Norton, Richard W., Jr. Haverford Court 0947 

Nova, Fritz 605 Railroad Ave 1132 

Oakley, Cletus O. Featherbed Lane 3109W 

Oberholtzer Mrs. Beatrice 203 E. Evergreen Ave., Phila- 
delphia, 18 Chestnut Hill 5847 

Ohl, Raymond T. 148 Cricket Ave., Ardmore 1381W 

Palmer, Frederic, Jr. 7 College Lane 7997R 

Pancoast, Omar, Jr. Erskine Hall 9627 

Pepinsky, Abraham 4 College Circle 

Pfund, Harry W. 624 Overhill Rd., Ardmore 5532 

Post, Amy L. C-3 Dreycott Apts 1643W 

Post, L. Arnold 9 College Lane 0258M 

Rantz, J. Otto 2122 Chestnut Ave., Ardmore 

Rittenhouse, Leon H. 6 College Lane 5522 

Salomone, A. William 208 N. 65th St., Phila., 39 

Sargent, Ralph M. 510 Railroad Ave 3339 

Scaife, Mary L. E-4 Haverford Gables 5117 

Shudeman, Conrad L. B Founders Hall, East 9460 

Snyder, Edward D. 36 Railroad Ave 0712 

Steere, Douglas V. 739 College Ave 0162 

Stinnes, Edmund H. 601 Walnut Lane 6759 

Stokes, Samuel E., Jr. Founders Hall 9533 

Stone, Brinton H. 774 Millbrook Lane 5555W 

Sutton, Richard M 785 College Av. (facing Walton Rd.) 0742W 

Swan, Alfred J. 3 College Lane 1562 

Taylor, Dr. Herbert W. 457 Lancaster Ave. 2383 

Teaf, Howard M., Jr 3 College Lane 4049J 

Vedova, George C. 1463 Hampstead Rd., Penn Wynne.... 3750R 

Vittorini, Domenico 1005 Edgewood Rd., Brookline, 

Pa Hilltop 1417J 

Watson, Frank D. 773 College Ave 2937 

Williamson, Alexander J. ... 4 College Lane 4023 

Wills, William Mintzer B-201 Merion Garden Apt., Mer- 

ion, Pa. Merion 4760 

Wilson, Albert H. 765 College Ave 1853 

Wylie, Laurence W. 8 College Lane 9613 



15 nii 



MILITARY STAFF 

72n(i A. A. F. T. T. Detachment — Basic Premeteorology Unit 
Major William G. Frey, A. C, Commanding Officer and 

Post Commandant Ardmore 7903J 

428 Haverford Rd., Wynnewood 

1st Lt. Jack S. Cummings, A. C ....Bryn Mawr 2696 

564 Montgomery Ave., Bryn Mawr 

3327 Service Unit — Basic Engineering, Foreign Area & Language Studies 

Capt. Darryl W. Travis, Inf., Commanding Officer Cynwyd 0903R 

911 Hagysford Rd., Penn Valley 

2nd Lt. Edward J. Schiffler, A. U. S., Adjutant Bryn Mawr 1493M 

S. W. Cor. New Gulph & Fishers Rd., Bryn Mawr 
2nd Lt. Wesley R. McCIanahan, A. U. S., Training Ardmore 6769 W 

Founders Hall, East 

2nd Lt. Herbert O. Carlson, A. U. S., Supply Ardmore 4031 

31 S. Wyoming Ave., Ardmore 

2nd Lt. John A. Clark, A. G. D., Classification Ardmore 3109M 

Woodside Cottage (on Campus) 

COLLEGE OFFICE AND BUILDING TELEPHONES 

Academic Directors: 

BE & PM Units, C. B. Allendoerfer 6400 

German A & L Unit, H. W. Pfund . 6400 

Italian A & L Unit, H. Comfort 6400 

Admissions, Archibald Macintosh, Director 6400 

Alumni Office, Executive Secretary, Raymond T. Ohl.... 6400 

Army Air Forces Technical Training Command Office 3882 

Army Specialized Training Unit 4066 

Army Units, Academic Records Office 6400 

Assistant to the President, Brinton H. Stone 6400 

Barclay Hall North: Army Premeteorology Unit ^506 

Barclay Hall, South: Army Premeteorology Unit 9508 

Barclay Hall, Center: Army Premeteorology Unit 9459 

Biology Laboratory (Sharpless Hall) 6400 

Business Office, W. M. Wills, Comptroller 6400 

Bucky Foundation Office 6400 

Chemistry Laboratory: 

W. B. Meldrum 6400 

T. O. Jones 6400 

Coordinator of Army Units and Dean of Mihtary Students: 

H. M. Teaf, Jr 6400 

Dean's Office, Acting Dean, Thomas C. Gibb 6400 

Dietitian. Mrs. Gladys Lacroix ...' 6400 

Engineering Laboratory (Hilles) 6400 

Faculty Secretary .' 6400 

Founders Hall, East 9460 

Founders Hall, Dormitory 9533 

Government House 9613 

Gymnasium (Public Pay Station) 9512 

Gymnasium Office 6400 

Haverford News 4894 

Haverford Review, Raymond T. Ohl, Managing Editor.... 6400 

Hilles Laboratory of Applied Science (Engineering)... 6400 

L. H. Rittenhouse 6400 

T. B. Hetzel [ 6400 

C. W. Holmes 6400 

C. 0. Rantz 6400 



Infirmary, Mabel S. Beard, R. N 6400 

Kitchen 6400 

Language House, Manuel J. Asensio, Director . 9428 

Library: 

D. P. Lockwood, Librarian 6400 

Amy L. Post 6400 

Circulation Desk 6400 

Thomas E. Drake 6400. 

Anna B. Hewitt (Treasure Room) 6400 

Lloyd Hall, 3rd Entry (Kinsey) .. 9520 

Lloyd Hall, 5th Entry (Strawbridge) 9514 

Lloyd Hall, 8th Entry (Leeds) 9628 

Merion Hall 9458 

Merion Hall Annex 9630 

Physics Laboratory (Sharpless Hall) : 6400 

Power House 6400 

President, Felix Morley 6400 

Reconstruction and Relief Unit Office 6400 

Registrar, W. M. Wills 6400 

Research Laboratory, Alan S. FitzGerald, Director 5092 

Science House (521 Panmure Road).... 9523 

Secretary to the President: Mary L. Scaife 6400 

Sharpless Hall: 

Aldo Casein 6400 

Howard Comfort 6400 

Francis *C. Evans 6400 

Howard K. Henry 6400 

Albert A. La Fleur 6400 

Donald P. LeGalley 6400 

Frederic Palmer, Jr 6400 

Abraham Pepinsky 6400 

Richard M. Sutton 6400 

Superintendent, R. J. Johnston 6400 

Vice President, Archibald Macintosh 6400 

Whitall Hall: 

John W. Flight 6400 

Maylon H. Hepp 6400 

John G. Herndon 6400 

John A. Kelly 6400 

William E. Lunt 6400 

Harry W. Pfund 6400 

Ralph M. Sargent 6400 

Edward D. Snyder 6400 

Douglas V. Steere 6400 

Howard M. Teaf, Jr 6400 

Frank D. Watson 6400 



FACULTY OFFICE TELEPHONES 
(The follov/ing can be reached by calling Ardmore 6400) 



Allendoerfer 


Green 


Jones, T. 0. 


Macintosh 


Rantz 


Caselli 


Gummere 


Kelly 


Meldrum 


Rittenhouse 


Comfort, H. 


Haddleton 


Kikuchi 


Morley 


Sargent 


Drake 


Henry 


Kirk 


Oakley 


Snyder 


Evans, A. 


Hepp 


La Fleur 


Ohl 


Steere 


Evans, F. C. 


Herndon 


LeGalley 


Palmer 


Sutton 


Flight 


Hetzel 


Lockwood 


Pepinsky 


Teaf 


Gibb 


Holmes 


Lunt 


Pfund 


Watson 
Wilson 



DIRECTORY 

STUDENTS IN THE COLLEGE 

In the last column is given the number of the student's dormitory 
room; F for Founders Hall, Gov. H. for Government House, Lg. H. for 
Language House, M for Merion, S for Science House, D for day student. 
The field of major concentration is indicated in parentheses. The figure 
following the name indicates the number of the term now being com- 
pleted. Day student's home telephones are listed beneath their addresses. 

Division into undergraduate terms and graduate departments will 
be found in Part Two. 

PART ONE 

CIVILIAN STUDENTS 

(Alphabetically Arranged) 

A 

Name Home Address College Address 

Alford, Theodore Crandall, Jr., 7 (Chemistry) Left 

Theoford Farm, McLean, Va. 

Annesley, William Honeyford, Jr., 3 109 M 

4667 Leiper St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Amett, John Hancock, Jr., 2 17 M 

6200 Ardleigh St., Germantown, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Atkinson, Anna Margaret (R&R) (A.B., Brown, 1942) D 

Wrightstown, Pa. 
Media 4507 

B 

Bacon, Roger, 1 4 M 

3307 Clarendon Rd., Cleveland Heights, Ohio 

Barclay, Mary (R&R), (A.B., Middlebury, 1943) 12 Lg. H. 

424 N. Bluff, Wichita, Kansas 

Bartlett, Frederick Henry, Jr., 5 (Chemistry) 13 S 

15 S. Somerset Ave., Ventnor City, N. J. 

Bedrossian, Robert Haig, 5 (Chemistry) 8 S 

4501 State Road, Drexel Hill, Pa. 

Benge, John H., 6 (Chemistry) 8 S 

237 Washington St., Kennett Square, Pa. 

Bennett, Peter Goldthwait, 2 c/o Dr. Snyder 

82 Washington St., Wellesley Hills, Mass. 

Birdsall, Thomas Morrison, 5 (Chemistry) 13 S 

139 Booth Lane, Haverford, Pa. 

Blake, Frederick Leighton, 1 101 M 

214 W. Hillcrest Ave., Upper Darby, Pa. 

Block, Edward, 6 (Physics) 23 F 

810 W. Sedgwick St., Mt. Airy, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Brooks, Charlotte Hallowell (R&R) (A.B., Smith, 1942) 8 Lg. H. 

45 Mystic St., West Medford, Mass. 

Brown, Rodman Weld, 2 106 M 

416 Linden St., Wellesley Hills, Mass. 

Bryson, Arthur Earl, Jr., 4 102 M 

182 Myrtle St., Winnetka, Illinois 



Name Home Address College Addi-ess 

Buckley, James Coakley, 2 17 M 

620 Shadeland Ave., Drexel Hill, Pa. 

Burns, Stanley Sherman, Jr., 5 (Chemistry) 13 S 

4603 Pershing Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 

Bush-Brown, Albert, 3 5 F 

Quarry Farm, Ambler, Pa. 

C 

Calkins, Fay Gilkey (R&R), (A.B., Oberlin, 1943) 12 Lg. H. 

112 N. Evergreen St., Arlington, Va. 

Cameron, Angus Malcolm, 4 M Pent. 

318— 8th Ave., S. E., Minot, N. D. 

Gary, Sarah Comfort (R&R), (A.B., Vassar, 1940) 11 Lg. H. 

Ellet Lane and Wissahickon Ave., Mt. Airy, Phila., Pa. 

Chapman, Samuel Hudson, III, 2 

227 Thompson Blvd., Watertov^^n, N. Y. 

Chartener, William Houston, 5 

414 Parkway, Monessen, Pa. 

Coffin, Lewis Edward, 4 

150 /Dhurch St., Newton, Mass. 

Cole, Richard Wallace, 7 (Physics) 

260 Case Ave., Sharon, Pa. 

Cook, Edward Marshall, Jr., 4 

56 Cedarbrook Road, Ardmore, Pa. 
Hilltop 5690 

Cowan, AVilliam Edgar, 4 

3220 Cove Road, Merchantville, N. J. 

Cunningham, Bradley, III, 2 

3716 T St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

D 

Davis, Alan Marvin, 2 

205 W. 89th St., New York City 

Doane, Robert Fay, 3 

240 Tyson Ave., Glenside, Pa. 

Doehlert, Charles Alfred, Jr., 3 Ill M 

55 Elizabeth St., Pemberton, N. J. 

Domincovich, Paul Henry, 5 18 F 

236 W. School Lane, Germantown, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Douglas, Deborah Adams (R&R), (B.A., Sweetbrier, 1943) 9 Lg. H. 

704 E. 44th St., Savannah, Georgia 

Dowbinstein, Israel Morris, 2 D 

3211 N. 17th St., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Radcliff 2406 

Driscoll, Ruth Antoinette (R&R) 17 Railroad Av 

1629 Asbury Ave., Evanston, Illinois Haverford 

Ardmore 1190 

Dyer, Kimball Decker, 1 105 M 

14114 Grandmont Road, Detroit, Michigan 

E 

Ecroyd, Henry, 2 12 F 

226 Lenoir Ave., Wayne, Pa. 



1 


F 




4 


Gov. 


H. 


4 


F 




16 
11 


F 
D 

M 




In Service 


3 


F 




12 


M 





Name Home Address College Address 

Elkinton, Thomas, 8 (Chemistry) D 

135 Rose Lane, Haverford, Pa. 
Ardmore 6261 

Estey, John S., 1 13 M 

Overbridge Farm, Ephrata, Pa. 

Ewell, Albert Hunter, Jr., 3 D 

4937 Walton Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Sherwood 6213 

F 

Fetterman, Henry Harter, 7 (Chemistry) 8 S 

2608 Tilghman St., Allentown, Pa. 

Fowle, Helen Joy (R&R), (B.A., Wellesley, 1943) 5 College Cir. 

Thetford, Vermont 
Ardmore 3732 

Fox, Samuel M., Ill, 7 (Chemistry) 3 S 

805 The Cambridge, Alden Park, Germantown, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

G 
Garrison, Elizabeth B. (R&R), (A.B., Swarthmore, 1938) 7 Lg. H. 

Holicong, Pa. 

Gildemeister, Maria Luisa (R&R) Lg. H. 

157 E. 72nd St., New York City (temporary) 

Ginsburg, Silas Jay, 2 11 F 

5317 N. 16th St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Gold, Richard Louis, 2 14 M 

2835 N. Lake Drive, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Gomez, Manuel J., 8 ....(Government) 6 Gov. H. 

6106 Callowhill St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Good, Robert Crocker, 4 17 F 

419 Homestead Ave., Mount Vernon, N. Y. 

Goodman, Thomas Paton, 3 7 F 

5533 University Ave., Chicago, Illinois 

Grant, David Evans, 7 ^Chemistry) 6 S 

207 E. Michigan St., Milwaukee, Wis. 

Gregson, Earl Wesley, 5 (Philosophy) D 

758 Beechwood Road, Beechwood, Upper Darby, Pa. 
Ardmore 0761-R 

Gross, Gerald Connop, Jr., 1 13 F 

4543 Grant Road, N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Gross, Sheldon Harley, 4 11 M 

Quarters 15a, Fort Myer, Va. 

H 

Harned, Ben King, Jr., 1 6 M 

3318 Queen Lane, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Hay, Stephen, 3 D 

245 Ogden Ave., Swarthmore, Pa. 
Swarthmore 0266 

Henkels, Paul MacAllister, II, 4 D 

446 Church Lane, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Victor 3911 

Henne, John Kraffert, 1 13 M 

332 W. Oak St., Titusville, Pa. 



Name Home Address College Address 

Hershey, John Eldon, 1 8 Gov. H. 

809 Market St., Lemoyne, Pa. 

Herter, Theophilus John, 5 D 

232 Wendover Drive, Westgate Hills, Upper Darby, Pa. 
Hilltop 1016 

Higier, Theodore, 2 6 F 

160 Prospect Ave., Gloversville, N. Y. 

Hiltner, Theodore Martin, 4 Gym 

4215 E. 33rd St., Seattle, Washington 

Holmes, Robert William, 1 D 

720 Millbrook Lane, Haverford, Pa. 
Ardmore 4269W 

Hood, George Morris Whiteside, 2 6 M 

3308 Warden Drive, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Hsia, David Y., 6 (Chemistry) 8 Gov. H. 

115 W. 73rd St., New York, N. Y. 

Hsieh, Ho-Keng, 1 7 Gov. H. 

c/o Y. Y. Hsu, 129 E. 52nd St., New York, N. Y. 

Huebsch, Ian, 1 9 M 

285 Central Park, West, New York City 

Hulings, Clark E., 7 (Physics) 6 S 

2639 Edward Ave., Baton Rouge, La. 

J 

Jacobs, George Wayne, Jr., 3 8 F 

25 Fifth Ave., New York City 

Johnson, David, 2 2 F 

18 W. 122nd St., New York City 

Jones, Annette Roberts (R&R) (B.A., Wellesley, 1941; 

M.E., Winnetka, 1942) 14 Lg. H. 

272 Vine Ave., Highland Park, Illinois 

K 

Katchen, Julius, 2 21 F 

2 Hollywood Ave., West Long Branch, N. J. 

Kato, Walter Yoneo, 3 19 F 

41-5-D, Hunt, Idaho 

Kennedy, Francis Richard, 3 30 F 

810 High St., Paris, Kentucky 

Kirk, Robert Louis, 2 C.P.S. Camp 

20 W. Baltimore Ave., Media, Pa. 

Klein, Edwin Benedict, Jr., 2 In Service 

231 Bedford Road, Pleasantville, N. Y. 

Klein, Robert Anderson, 2 In Service 

231 Bedford Road, Pleasantville, N. Y. 

Kojima, Masamori, 6 (Government) D 

c/o Mrs. William H. Collins 

757 College Ave., Haverford, Pa. 
Ardmore 1089 

Kummel, Bertram Myron, 4 30 F 

110 Mayhew Drive, South Orange, N. J. 

L 

Langston, Martha Porter (R&R) (A.B., Scripps, 1937).... 14 Lg. H. 
1275 Morada Place, Altadena, California 



7 


M 




112 


M 




110 


M 




9 


Gov. 


H. 


7 


Gov. 


H. 


108 


M 




7 


M 




9 


S 





Name Home Address College Address 

Lankford, Henry Fillmore, 7 (History) 13 S 

69 Prince William St., Princess Anne, Md. 

Leaman, Arthur, 2 12 M 

330 Woodland Ave., Westfield, N. J. 

Lehmann, William L., 7 (Physics) 7 F 

118 Redfield Place, Syracuse, N. Y. 
Ardmore 5562 

Lenton, Charles Trewartha, 2 

1725 N. Edgewood St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

L#euchter, Ben Zion, 3 

E. Park Ave., Vineland, N. J. 

Libby, John Kelway, 4 

18 Cheston Ave., Annapolis, Md. 

Long, Charles, II, 2 

1128 70th Ave., Oak Lane, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Long, David E., 4 

1522 Cleveland Ave., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Longacre, Jacob Andrews, 2 

115 N. Reading Ave., Boyertown, Pa. 

M 

Manbeck, Harry Frederick, Jr., 2 

1403 Main St., Honesdale, Pa. 

Mann, Philip C, 2nd, 5 (Citizenship) 

33 Church St., Beverly, N. J. 

March, Robert, 6 (Engineering) Transferred 

4303— 13th St., N. E., Washington, D. C. 

Martin, Frank Ewart, 1 

2626 Terrace Drive, Honolulu, Hawaii 

Marvin, Cloyd, 3 

2601— 30th St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

McNeill, Donald Babbitt, 4 

239 W. 8th St., Erie, Pa. 

Meldrum, Donald N., 1 

747 College Ave., Haverford, Pa. 
Ardmore 0881J 

Montgomery, George, Jr., 5 (Chemistry) 

6124 Columbia Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Muench, James Frederick, 2 

300 Riverside Drive, New York, 25, N. Y. 

Mumma, James Fenninger, 5 (Chemistry) 

101 Enterprise Ave., Waynesboro, Pa. 

N 

Nicklin, George Leslie, Jr., 2 

2918 Berkley Road, Ardmore, Pa. 
Ardmore 4786 

Norton, Richard William, Jr., 6 

Haverford Court, Haverford, Pa. 
Ardmore 0947 

O 

Osuga, William M., 5 c/o Dr. Watson 

773 College Ave., Haverford, Pa. 



10 


S 




10 


F 




6 


Gov. 
D 


H. 


5 


S 




9 


Gov. 


H. 


5 


S 




Ir 


I Service 




D 





Name Home Address College Address 

P 

Page, Laurama (R&R) (B.A., Swarthmore, 1943) 11 Lg. H. 

2424 Lincoln St., Evanston, Illinois 

Palmer, Arthur Walden, Jr. (A.B., Amherst, '43) (English) D 

Haverford School, Haverford, Pa. 

Parker, John Hunter, 1 103 M 

Columbia Pike, R. 2, Ellicott City, Md. 

Parkes, Robert Irving, Jr., 2 In Service 

87 Ivy Way, Port Washington, N. Y. 

Petersen, Hans Eberhard, 3 107 M 

145— 95th St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Plumb, Lois Virginia (R&R) (B.A., Wilson College, 1943) 
20 Primrose Ave., Tuckahoe, N. Y. 

Preston, Edmond, III, 6 (Chemistry) 

531 E. Tulpehocken St., Germantown, Phila., Pa. 

R 

Rawnsley, Howard Melody, 2 

141 W. 10th Ave., Conshohocken, Pa. 

Read, Michael Meredith, 1 

634 S. Gramercy Place, Los Angeles, Calif. 

Rivers, Richard D., 3 

1281 Everett Ave., Louisville, Kentucky 

Roche, Robert Pearson, 2 

109 Weyford Terrace, Garden City, L. I., N. Y. 

RogoflF, Richard Caesar, 4 

25 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Root, Vernon Metcalf, 7 (.Chemistry) 30 F 

Beekman Tower, 3 Mitchell Place, New York City 

Ryan, Thomas Joseph, 5 (English) 

1216 Lindale Ave., Drexel Hill, Pa. 

Ryrie, Charles Caldwell, 5 (Mathematics) 

1007 Henry St., Alton, Illinois 

S 

Sanders, Martin, 1 

55 Clinton Place, Bronx, New York City 

Sangree, Charles Spahr, 4 

103 Madison St., Wellsville, N. Y. 

Schneider, Stewart Porterfield, 4 

14 Hathaway Lane, Verona, N. J. 

Scott, George Hubert, 2 

Church of the Redeemer, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 
Bryn Mawr 0619-W 

Seligsohn, Walter Israel, 1 

590 Fort Washington Ave., New York City 

Shearer, Charles Robert, 1 

7528 Rogers Ave., Highland Park, Del. .Co., Pa. 
Sunset 4688 

Sherpick, William Edwards, 4 13 S 

430 E. 57th St., New York City 

Slotnick, Herbert Norman, 6 (Chemistry) 13 S 

109 Crawford Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 



8 


Lg.H. 


3 


S 


104 


M 


Left 


9 


Gov. H. 


5 


M 


15 


F 



3 


S 




8 


M 




2 


Gov. 


H. 


In Service 


8 


M 
D 




9 


F 
D 


1 



College 


Address 


In Service 


In Service 


4 


M 


114 


M 




M Pent. 



Name Home Address 

Smiley, Francis, Jr., 4 

The Laurels, Mohonk Lake, N. Y. 

Smith, Gibson, Jr., 1 

R. D. 6, York, Pa. 

Starkweather, Howard Warner, Jr., 1 

815 Augusta Road, Wilmington, Del. 

Steefel, Lawrence D., Jr., 2 

2808 West River Road, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Stokes, Joseph, III, 5 (Chemistry) 

159 W. Coulter St., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Street, John Lyle (B.S., Wm. Penn Col., '43).... (Chemistry) c/o Mr. Stone 
Route No. 2, Mabel, Minneapolis 

Stuart, John Walker, 5 (Chemistry) M Pent. 

30 E. 68th St., New York City 

Sturr, George Bowler Tullidge, 2 10 Gov. H. 

129 Fourth Ave., Haddon Heights, N. J. 

T 

Tanaka, Augustus Masashi, 6 (.Chemistry) 4 Gov. H. 

American Friends Service Committee, 
20 S. 12th St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Taylor, Andrew Eustace, 2 In Service 

3624 Van Ness St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Taylor, Richard Clark, 2 113 M 

3315 R St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Thawley, Stanley Brevoort, 4 20 F 

245 N. Somerset Ave., Crisfield, Md. 

Thomson, Sydney Elise (R&R) (B.A., Smith, 1943) 9 Lg. H. 

38 Alexander St., Princeton, N. J. 

Trainer, Mason, 6 (Engineering) 7 S 

1368 Arlington Ave., Columbus, Ohio 

Tuttle, Barbara Searles (R&R) (B.A., Wellesley, 1943).... 9 Lg. H. 
202 E. Grove St., Oneida, N. Y. 

W 

Walters, James Donald, 1 22 F 

90 Brite Ave., Scarsdale, N. Y. 

Wehmeyer, Jean Adele (R&R) (B.A., Smith, 1943) 7 Lg. H. 

R. F. D., Clinton Corners, N. Y. 

Whitehead, H. Macy, 2 10 S 

424 Nuber Ave., Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

Willar, Edgar William, Jr., 8 (English) D 

140 Montgomery Ave., Bala-Cynwyd, Pa. 
Cynwyd 1394 

Williams, Mary Esther (R&R) (B.A., Vassar, 1943) 8 Lg. H. 

1317 Bishop Road, Grosse Pointe, Michigan 

Wright, Daniel Ranney, 1 22 F 

1422 Wyandotte Ave., Lakewood, Ohio 
Wright, James Boyer, 7 (Chemistry) 7 F 

7008 Wayne Ave., Upper Darby, Pa. 
Ardmore 5562 

Wylie, Anne Stiles (R&R) (B.S., Simmons, 1943) Gov. H. 

270 Brookline Ave., Boston, Mass. 



Name Home Address College Address 

Wylie, Laurence William (R&R) (A.B. and A.M., Indiana Gov. H. 

Univ., 1931, 1933) (Ph.D., Brown Univ., 1940) 

270 Brookline Ave., Boston, Mass. 



Zimmerman, Thomas C, 1 

719 Winans Way, Baltimore, Md. 



M Pent. 



PART TWO 



Gomez 



8th Term (2) 
6 Gov. H. Willar 



•Day 



7th Term (11) 



Alford Left 

Cole 16 F 

Elkinton Day 

Fetterman 8 S 

Fox 3 S 

Grant 6 S 



Hulings 6 S 

Lankford 13 S 

Lehmann 7 F 

Root 30 F 

Wright, J. B. 7 F 



6th Term (10) 

Benge 8 S Norton Day 

Block 23 F Preston 3 S 

Hsia 8 Gov. H. Slotnick 13 S 

Kojima Day Tanaka 4 Gov. H. 

March 7 S Trainer 7 S 

5th Term (16) 



Bartlett 13 S 

Bedrossian 8 S 

Birdsall 13 S 

Burns 13 S 

Chartener 4 Gov. H. 

Domincovich 18 F 

Gregson Day 

Herter Day 



Mann 9 S 

Montgomery 5 S 

Mumma 5 S 

Osuga Day 

Ryan 13 S 

Ryrie 8 M 

Stokes, J. M M. Pent. 

Stuart M. Pent. 



4th Term (19) 



Bryson 102 M 

Cameron M. Pent. 

Coffin 4 F 

Cook Day 

Cowan 11 M 

Good 7 F 

Gross, S. H 11 M 

Henkels Day 

Hiltner Gym 

Kummel 30 F 



Libby 110 M 

Long, D. E. 7 Gov. H. 

McNeill 6 Gov. H. 

Rogoff 15 F 

Sangree In Service 

Schneider 8 M 

Sherpick 13 S 

Smiley In Service 

Thawley 20 F 



Annesley 109 M 

Bush-Brown 5 F 

Doane 12 M 

Doehlert Ill M 

Ewell Day 

Goodman 17 F 

Hay .. Day 



3rd Term (14) 

Jacobs 8 F 

Kato 19 F 

Kennedy 30 F 

Leuchter 112 M 

Marvin 10 F 

Petersen 107 M 

Rivers 9 Gov. H. 



2nd 

Arnett 17 M 

Bennett Pay 

Brown 8 F 

Buckley 17 M 

Chapman 1 F 

Cunningham In Service 

Davis 3 F 

Dowbinstein Day 

Ecroyd 12 F 

Ginsburg 11 F 

Gold 14 M 

Higier 6 F 

Hood 6 M 

Johnson 2 F 

Katchen 21 F 

Kirk, R. L C.P.S. Camp 

Klein, E. B., Jr. In Service 



Term (34) 

Klein, R. A. In Service 

Leaman 12 M 

Lenton 7 M 

Long, C. 9 Gov. H. 

Longacre ..108 M 

Manbeck 7 M 

Muench 9 Gov. H. 

Nicklin In Service 

Parkes In Service 

Rawnsley 104 M 

Roche 5 M 

Scott Day 

Steefel 114 M 

Sturr 10 Gov. H. 

Taylor, A. E. In Service 

Taylor, R. C 113 M 

Whitehead 10 S 



1st Term (23) 



Bacon 4 M 

Blake 101 M 

Dyer 105 M 

Estey 13 M 

Gross, G. C, Jr 13 M 

Harned 6 M 

Henne 13 M 

Hershey 8 Gov. H. 

Holmes Day 

Hsieh 7 Gov. H. 

Huebsch 9 M 

Martin 10 S 



Meldrum Day 

Parker 103 M 

Read Left 

Sanders 2 Gov. H. 

Seligsohn 9 F 

Shearer Day 

Smith, G. ..In Service 

Starkweather 4 M 

Walters 22 F 

Wright, D. R 22 F 

Zimmerman ..M. Pent. 



Graduate Students (3) 



Palmer Day 

Street Day 



Wylie Gov. H. 



Reconstruction and Relief Unit (19) 
At Language House 

Telephone — Ardmore 9428 

Barclay, Mary Langston, Martha Porter 

Brooks, Charlotte Hallowell Page, Laurama 

Calkins, Fay Gilkey Plumb, Lois Virginia 

Cary, Sarah Comfort Thomson, Sydney Elise 

Douglas, Deborah Adams Tuttle, Barbara Searles 

Garrison, Elizabeth Brosius Wehmeyer, Jean Adele 

Gildemeister, Maria Luisa Williams, Mary Eisther 
Jones, Annette Roberts 



Atkinson, Anna Margaret, Pendle Hill , Media 4507 

Driscoll, Ruth Antoinette, 17 Railroad Ave Ardmore 1190 

Fowle, Helen Joy, 5 College Circle Ardmore 3732 

Wylie, Anne Stiles, Government House Ardmore 9613 



(^3ir^<:^ '\r\ Softer Dir«ictor^ - v.^S^ r^oA) 



HAVERFORD COLLEGE CATALOG 



Supplement 

1943-44 

MILITARY UNITS 

72nd ARMY AIR FORCES 
TECHNICAL TRAINING DETACHMENT 

BASIC PREMETEOROLOGY 

3327 SERVICE UNIT 
ARMY SPECIALIZED TRAINING PROGRAM 

BASIC ENGINEERING 
FOREIGN AREA and LANGUAGE STUDY 

NOVEMBER, 1943 



HAVERFORD COLLEGE 

ADMINISTRATION 

Felix M. Morley, President of the College 

Archibald Macintosh, Vice President and Director of Admissions 

William Mintzer Wills, Comptroller and Registrar 

Robert J. Johnston, Superintendent 

Herbert W. Taylor, Physician in Charge 

Howard M. Teaf , Jr., Coordinator of Army Units and Dean of Military Students 

Basic Premeteorology 

72nd Army Air Forces Technical Training Detachment 

MILITARY STAFF 

Name Home Address 

Major William G. Frey, 

A. C, Commandant 24 Quaker Ave., Cornwall, New York 

1st Lt. Jack S. Cummings, 

A. C. 348 Sterling St., Clinton, Massachusetts 

2nd Lt. James E. Foscue, 

A. C. High Point, North Carolina 

PERMANENT PARTY 
(Enlisted Personnel) 

Name Home Address 

T/Sgt. James K. O'Hanlon 5411 Westminster Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 

T/Sgt. Loren G. Harding 84 E. 27th Ave., S. E., Minneapolis, Minn. 

S/Sgt. Robert W. Cleaveland La Grange, Georgia. 

S/Sgt. Albert Sloman 506 Columbia St., Hudson, New York 

Sgt. Vernon L. Hesse 1940 Gaynor St., Wisconsin Rapids, Wis. 

Sgt. Charles L. Montgomery 40 Sayre St., Elizabeth, New Jersey. 

Pfc. Murray Weinstein 1454 Walton Ave., Bronx, New York, N. Y. 

Pvt. Stanley A. Bown 16 D St., Niagara Falls, New York. 

Pvt. Matthew Kosmidor 43 Main St., Yorkville, New York. 

(Medical Department) 

T/5th Woodrow W. Cornine R. D. No. 1, Newton, New Jersey 
Pfc. Leonard 0. Olson 715 Spruce St., Wausau, Wisconsin 



FACULTY** 

Academic Directors: Feb. to August — Dr. Richard M. Sutton 

Sept. to Feb.— Dr. Carl B. Allendoerfer 

Allendoerfer, Carl B. — ^Vector Mechanics 

Benham, Thomas A. — Physics 

Drake, Thomas E. — History and English 

Evans, Francis C. — Geography 

Flight, John W. — History and English 

Gibb, Thomas C. — History and English 

Green, Louis C. — Mathematics 

Hepp, Maylon H. — History and English 

Herndon, John G. — History and English 

Holmes, Clayton W. — Mathematics 

Kikuchi, Chihiro — Mathematics, Vector Mechanics, Physics 

Kirk, David B. — Mathematics , 

La Fleur, Albert A. — Geography 

JLe Galley, Donald P. — Physics 

Lockwood, Dean P. — History and English 

[Lunt, William E. — History and English 

j Oakley, Cletus O. — Mathematics 

I Ohl, Raymond T. — History and English 

Pancoast, Omar, Jr. — Geography, History and English 

Pepinsky, Abraham — Physics, Vector Mechanics 

' Post, L. Arnold — History and English 

I Sargent, Ralph M. — History and English 

j Shudeman, Conrad L. B. — Physics 

Snyder, Edward D. — History and English 

Sutton, Richard M. — Physics 

jVedova, George C — Mathematics 

! Wilson, Albert H. — Mathematics, Vector Mechanics 

SECRETARIES 

Name Home Address 

Miss Frances T. Light, B-201 Concord Arms, Haverford, Penna. 

Miss Eva L. Marcian Garrett Ave., Garrett Hill, Penna. 

Miss Margaret L. Mell 121 Runnymede Ave., Wayne, Penna. 

Miss Janet L. Tetlow 229 Argyle Road, Ardmore, Penna. 

** All Faculty Members may be addressed: Haverford College, Haverford, Pa. 



Basic Premeteorologfy 

72n'd Army Air Forces Technical Training Detachment 

PREMETEOROLOGY STUDENTS 



Name 
Ahlsten, Allan R. 
Allen, David R. 
Allen, John J. 
Allen, Morris L. 
Armour, George P. 
Aronson, Robert S. 
Arthur, Richard J. 
Aspis, Daniel 
Axon. John T. 
Balletta, Robert F. 
Bardsley, James C. 
Bauman, Roy B. 
Becker, Norman F. 
Bender, Donald B. 
Berg, Carl T. 
Berger, Arthur L. 
Berlin, Gerald F. 
Bernsteeen, Herbert L. 
Bierbaum, William B. 
Black, John 0. 
Blackburn, George F. 
Blake, Oscar J. 
Bloom, Lewis R. 
Bomberger, Robert L. 
Bookatz, Donald P. 
Bordow, Burton W. 
Borkowski, John J. 
Bottom, Gordon B. 
Bowers, John M., Jr. - 
Brandis, Philip G. 
Brooks, Charles B. 
Brown, Michael John A. 
Brummer, Robert D. 
Bryant, Clifford M. 
Buran, Joseph E. 
Burgwald, Glenn M. 
Burnett, John G. 
Burrus, Ray Cooke, Jr. 
Caplin, Robert M. 
Castronovo, Jack T. 
Chamberlain, Thomas R. 
Chapman, Harold W. 
Christian, Thomas W. 
Clubb, Albert R. 
Collins, James W. 
Collins, William G. 
Corrie, John D. 
Craven, William A., Jr. 
Darfler, Willard C. 
Davis, James C, Jr. 
Deitrick, Ralph W., Jr. 
De Mocker, Lyle B. 
Deutsch, Henry J. 
Di Phillipo, Anthony J. 



Home Address 
1025 Pine St., Marquette, Michigan 
24 School St., Lake Placid, New York 
600 S. 6th St., Mt. Vernon, New York 
Hickory Corners, Michigan 
50 Roberts Road, Bryn Mawr, Penna. 
1942 Wightman St., Squirrel Hill, Pittsburgh, Pa 
126 W. Euclid Ave., Springfield, Ohio 
2162 Valentine Ave., Bronx, New York 
29 Southland 'Court, Towson, Maryland 
47-37 Parsons Blvd., Flushing, New York 
3314 Clarendon Road, Brooklyn, New York 
R. R. No. 4, Sullivan, Illinois 
Canada St., Holland, New York 
70 Passaic Ave., Chatham, New Jersey 
331 E. Chocolay St., Munising, Michigan 
217 Bedford Ave., Bellmore, New York 
Oak St.. Ramsey, New Jersey 
16003 Chadbourne Road, Shaker Heights, Ohio 
1241 E. Burnett Ave., Louisville, Kentucky 
16 Broad St., Pittston, Penna. 
297 River St., Northboro, Massachusetts 
R. R. No. 1, Fayetteville, West Virginia 
262 Central Park West, New York, N. Y. 
604 S. Broad St., Lititz, Penna. 
773 E. 103rd St., Cleveland, Ohio 
1379 Noel Ave., Hewlett, New York 
102 N. 19th St., Wheeling, West Virginia 
482 Central Ave., Bridgeport, Connecticut 
633 E. 4th St., Mount Carmel, Penna. 
79 E. 32nd St., Brooklyn, New York 
99 Hudson Ave., Haverstraw, New York 
3338 N. Lincoln Ave., Chicago, Illinois 
77 Park Ave., New York, N. Y. 
South iChester Road, Swarthmore, Penna. 
2107 Watson Blvd, Endicott, New York 
10628 Avenue F, Chicago, Illinois 
2527 N. Stowell Ave., Milwaukee, Wisconsin 
346 N. Globe Road, Arlington, Virginia. 
11-28 V/ood St., Easton, Penna. 
2653 N. Meade Ave., Chicago, Illinois 
42 Broadman Parkway, Jersey City, New Jersey 
3009 Graham Ave., Windber, Penna. 
4421 N. Kildare Ave., Chicago, Illinois 
Melvin, Illinois 

425 Jefferson St., Greenfield, Ohio 
26-05 14th St., Long Island City, New York 
3722 Frankford Ave., Philadelphia, Penna. 
26 Harding St., Maplewood, New Jersey 
12802 Greenwood Ave., Blue Island, Illinois 
R. D. No. 1, Charleroi, Penna. 
19711 Purnell Ave., Rocky River, Ohio 
8 Hulburt Ave., Fairport, New York 
4027 Bedford Ave., Brooklyn, New York 
26 Edgemont Ave., Clifton Heights, Penna. 






Name 



Home Address 



Dodd, Arthur V. 
Dudek, Edmund C. 
Dunn, James P. 
D'Ur'onio, Valerio M. 
Ebner, Gerald 
Eckerle, Nickolas C. 
Edwards, Charles W. 
Eisemann, Alexander, Jr. 
Elstun, Wesley B. 
Epstein, Hyman 
Ettelstein, Morton S. 
Fahnestock, Wayne G., Jr. 
Farrow, George W. 
Faynor, Raymond C. 
Ferguson, Robert 0. 
Fitzsimmons, Richard M. 
Flaws, Carl L., Jr. 
Foster, Robert E. 
Freeman, James B. 
Friedman, Tom R. 
Gary, Rex I., Jr. 
Gibbs, Edward H., Jr. 
Glover, Louis S. 
Greene, James D. 
Gronek, John F. 
Gruninger, Erwin E. 
Hackett, Dale 0. 
Hagopian, John 
Halpern, Joseph 
Hammar, Arthur T. 
Hawkes, David A. 
Hayes, Donald 
Hazel, Edwin P. 
Hessmann, George D. 
Himmelman, iCharles 
Hirsch, Edwin P. 
Hirsch, Joseph E. 
Hoffman, Rodney G. 
Hope, William F. 
Hreczuch, Adam J. 
Hubbard, Ernest T. 
Jaffe, Lewis L. 
Jellema, Dirk W. 
Johnson, Aaron H. 
Jones, Clabum H. 
Kasten, Edward F. 
Katzmann, George R., Jr. 
Kent, James, Jr. 
King, Robert L. 
Klotz, Leonard 
Kohn, Erwin J. 
Kranz, Norman 
La Barbera, Joseph J. 
La Cour, Wesley D. 
La Due, James J. 
'Lanin, Myron A. 
Lari, Guido A. 
Lawrence, John C. 
Leach, William J. 



205 Swarthmore Ave., Swarthmore, Penna. 

2142 W. Homer St., Chicago, Illinois 

1116 N. Cory St., Findlay, Ohio 

601 3rd St., Monessen, Penna. 

156 E. 91st St., Brooklyn, New York 

3129 Osage St., St. Louis, Missouri 

Box No. 14, Amsterdam, Ohio 

888 Park Ave., New York, N. Y. 

6330 Forest Ave., Hammond, Indiana 

209 Division Ave., Brooklyn, New York 

810 W. Poplar St., York, Penna. 

518 S. Broad St., Lititz, Penna. 

150-54 117th Ave., Jamaica, New York 

5228 S. Emerald Ave., .Chicago, Illinois 

1633 Brownsville Road, Pittsburgh, Penna. 

Bristol Road, Clinton, New York 

1310 W. 91st St., Chicago, Illinois 

41 Cutler St., Winthrop, Massachusetts 

751 Hillsdale Ave., Akron, Ohio 

2940 Simpson St., Evanston, Illinois 

300 Yale Ave., Swarthmore, Penna. 

294 159th St., Calumet City, Illinois 

Harpers Ferry, West Virginia 

126 Manhattan Ave., New York, N. Y. 

1842 Whipple St., Chicago, Illinois 

1305 Wollram St., Chicago, Illinois 

15 Summer St., Newport, Vermont 
6034 Walnut St., Philadelphia, Penna. 
810 Howard Ave., Brooklyn, New York 
424 Oak St., Ishpeming, Michigan 

8 Central Ave., Manchester, New York 

113 Sharon Ave., Collingdale, Penna. 

857 S. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, Penna. 

505 Tavistock Blvd., Haddonfield, New Jersey 

104 W. 94th St., New York, N. Y. 

3848 Porter St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

581 Main St., Poughkeepsie, New York 

2252 S. Taylor Road, Cleveland Heights, Ohio 

2211/2 W. Exchange St., Freeport, Illinois 

454 3rd St., Brooklyn, New York 

421 Montford Ave., Mill Valley, California 

228 W. Penn St., Butler, Penna. 

528 N. Jordan St., Bloomington, Indiana 

178 Grove St., Mount Kisco, New York 

199 Roger Williams Ave., Highland Park, Illinois 

2123 N. Bartlett Ave., Milwaukee, Wisconsin 

10515 Longwood Drive, Chicago, Illinois 

12 Elm St., Norwich, New York 

R. D. No. 3, Chagrin Falls, Ohio 

45-08 40th St., Sunnyside, New York, N. Y. 

5102 Kenmore Ave., Chicago, Illinois 

5250 Drexel Blvd, Chicago, Illinois 

83 E. Main St., Cuba, New York 

Box No. 164, West Trenton, New Jersey 

7 Lawn .Court, Poughkeepsie, New York 

16 S. Hillside Ave., Ventnor City, New Jersey 
24-17 98th St., E. Elmhurst, New York, N. Y. 
3594 Cedarbrook Road, Cleveland, Ohio 

332 Charles St., Turtle Creek, Penna. 



Nam€ 



Home Address 



Leader, Robert E. 
Leanza, Frank R. 
Le Fevre, Edmund A. 
Leiser, Jack F. 
Lemmon, Edward J. 
Lempert, Joseph H. 
Lewis, Everett E. 
Lindsey, WiLiam M. 
Lippman, Morton A. 
Long, Donald H. 
Lorincz, Alexander L. 
Luber, Mark H. 
Luedeking, Robert 
Lundy, Richard Dorr 
Lutz, Robert W. 
Madden, Joseph E. 
Madison, James L. 
Marcus, Harold 
Martin, Frederick T. 
McGrath, Douglas D. 
McKee, Ralph D., Jr. 
Miller, John E. 
Moraczewski, Thaddeus H. 
Moroney, James E. 
Mummert, Merrill E. 
Murphy, Charles G. 
Musgrave, David E. 
Myers, Albert 
Nagy, Ernest A. 
Nelson, Elmer T., Jr. 
Nelson, Robert H., Jr. 
Nimon, Kenneth R. 
Noble, Donald I. 
Noren, Carl R. 
Noren, Joseph D., Jr. 
Okun, Joshua 
Oleen, Donald C. 
Oleszkiewicz, Matthew A. 
Oliva, Odo 
Page, Lloyd W. 
Pangbom, Donlin C. 
Peake, Frederic M. 
Peck, Robert A. 
Phillips, Charles G. 
Pierson, Leland S., Jr. 
Pitkoff, Donald 
Postrel, Leo 
Poul, Franklin 
Powell, John F. 
Puskar, Robert 
Rader, Orville A. 
Reid, iCharles H., Jr. 
Remick, Russell L. 
Rettig, Albert S. 
Reynolds, Charles H. 
Rimbey, Donald H. 
Roach, Ernest J. 
Robbins, William H. 
Rosenthal, Milton 



317 E. Lima St., Findlay, Ohio 
314 N. Water St., Lltitz, Penna. 
363 Canterbury Road, Rochester, New York 
103 McKinley Ave., Kenmore, New York 
2318 23rd St., Long Island City, New York 
1707 Nelson Ave., Bronx, New York, N. Y. 
370 Central Park West, New York, N. Y. 
1118 Metropolis St., Metropolis, Illinois 
296 Meeker Ave., Newark, New Jersey 
502 S. Tennessee St., Danville, Indiana 
109 Gerald Ave., Highland Park, Michigan 
5350 Locust St., Philadelphia, Penna. 
835 Highland Ave., Lafayette, Indiana 
85 Knollwood St., Springfield, Massachusetts 
826 Michigan Ave., Evanston, Illinois 
34-28 43rd St., Long Island City, New York 
507 W. High St., Delaware, Ohio 
1636 Park Place, Brooklyn, New York 
535 E. Southern Ave., Springfield, Ohio 

201 N. Broadway, Yonkers, New York 
85 S. Euclid Ave., Bellevue, Penna. 

409 W. Price St., Germantown, Philadelphia, Pa. 

4832 Eddy St., Chicago, Illinois 

78-39 81st St., Glendale, New York 

2328 Ridgeway Ave., Evanston, Illinois 

Haverford Manor, Haverford, Penna. 

203 W. Fayette St., Connellsville, Penna. 

Box No. 44, Tillson, New York 

1944 W. 54th St., Cleveland, Ohio 

6944 Indiana Ave., Chicago, Illinois 

222 Main St., Binghamton, New York 

9 Erie St., Albion, New York 

R. D. No. 1, Manlius, New York 

Saint iCroix Falls, Wisconsin 

560 W. 175th St., New York, N. Y. 

100 Riverside Drive, New York, N. Y. 

Davisville, Rhode Island 

1063 Pearl St., Schenectady, New York 

178 Green St., Lockport, New York 

547 La Valle St., Readsburg, Wisconsin 

328 E. Chocolay St., Munising, Michigan 

3535 Townley Road, Shaker Heights, Ohio 

2021 Woodside Road, Ann Arbor, Michigan 

171 Cooper Ave., Upper Montclair, New Jersey 

802 S. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, Penna. 

324 E. 91st St., Brooklyn, New York 

14 Franklin Ave., Hewlett, New York 

6204 Ellsworth St., Philadelphia, Penna. 

316 Boyer Road, Cheltenham, Penna. 

202 Park Ave., Teaneck, New Jersey 
5118 S. Parkside Ave., Chicago, Illinois 

8 N. Chelsea Ave., Atlantic City, New Jersey 
579 Valentine St., Fall River, Massachusetts 
2860 W. 25th St., Brooklyn, New York 
R. D. No. 3, Freeholds, New Jersey 

614 S. Bodin St., Hinsdale, Illinois 
Stephentown, New York 

615 William St., Rome, New York 
1400 Benson St., New York, N. Y. 



Name 



Home Address 



Ross, Stanley R. 
Rudnick, Bernard H. 
Russell, William H. 
Santi, Albert 
Santimauro, Michael J. 
Saulon, Joseph F. 
Sayre, Leo V. 
Scarchilli, Angelo J. 
Schaefer, Charles G. 
Schlesinger, Stanley 
Schlesinger, Stanley A. 
Schramm, Raymond R. 
Schultz, Merle A. 
Sciorra, Albert F. 
Scott, Richard M. 
Seifert, Aurel M. 
Seller, Justin A. 
Settle, Lyle G. 
Share, Irving H. 
Sheldon, Roger W. 
Sherwood, Earl M. 
Siemert, Horace F. 
Singer, Arthur H. 
Singer, Norbert A. 
Slack, Keith V. 
Smith, Paul H. 
Smith, Royal B. 
Stein, Frederick P. 
Stein, Stanley J., Jr. 
Stoner, Robert E. 
Strutz, Roald W. 
Swett, Malcolm M. 
Thau, Paul 
Tucker, Arthur D. 
Tulevech, Michael C. 
Tuttle, Winthrop M. 
Ulmer, Raymond A. 
Unger, Arthur 
Urdang, Myron J. 
Vande Sande, George 
Van Nostrand, Robert J. 
Ventling, Harold D. 
Vessels, Frank E. 
Vines, John L. 
Wallen, Marvin Z. 
Walter, Roger W. 
Warren, Richard H, 
Weber, Robert J. 
Weiner, Ernest S. 
Welty, Orrin J. 
Wenske, Franklin A. 
White, Wallace F., Jr. 
Woeslaw, Wilbur A. 
Wood, Harry D. 
Wright, Wilbur E. 
Zachavitch, Earl A. 
Zaniewski, Chester A. 
Zimakowski, Stanley F., Jr. 



1502 Mott Ave., Far Rockaway, New York 
2643 N. 33rd St., Philadelphia, Penna. 
5632 Kenwood Ave., Chicago, Illinois 
1343 N. Ridgeway Ave., Chicago, Illinois 
234 Crescent St., Brooklyn, New York 
313 High St., Lowell, Massachusetts 
145 Madison St., Cortland, New York 
37 Worrall Ave., Poughkeepsie, New York 
111-28 112th St., Richmond Hill, New York 
1004 W. Wyoming Ave., Philadelphia, Penna. 
10231 88th Ave., Richmond Hill, New York 
378 Belleville Ave., Bloomfield, New Jersey 
Box No. 124, Holly, Colorado 
44 Bennett Ave., New York, N. Y. 
722 Highland Ave., Johnstown, Penna. 
162 Kimball Terrace, Yonkers, New York 

109 Carpenter Road, Mansfield, Ohio 
366 Beach Road, Syracuse, New York 
39 Leach St., Salem, Massachusetts 

6 Pacific St., Granville, New York 
Berwinsdale, Penna. 

201 Fisk Ave., Avalon, Pittsburgh, Penna. 
6100 Tyndall Ave., Bronx, New York, N. Y. 
R. R. No. 1, Ney, Ohio 

5623 Morrison Ave., Louisville, Kentucky 
College St., Clinton, New York 
9514 S. Damen Ave., Chicago, Illinois 
155 Foster Ave., Sayville, New York 
16 Park Lane, Trenton, New Jersey 
1004 17th St., S. W., Massillon, Ohio 
6139 S. Wood St., Chicago, Illinois 
49 South St., Middlebury, Vermont 
1785 E. 22nd St., Brooklyn, New York 
R. D. No. 1, Marathon, New York 
1858 Watson Ave., Bronx, New York, N. Y. 

202 E. Grove St., Oneida, New York 
3310 Eastwood, Chicago, Illinois 

258 E. 7th St., Brooklyn, New York 

3279 Chalfant Road, Shaker Heights, Ohio 

2024 W. Henrietta Road, Rochester, New York 

Little Delaware, Delhi, New York 

Danville, Ohio 

4214 W. 21st Place, Chicago, Dlinois 

7 Maple Ave., Fort Edward, New York 
255 Absecon Blvd, Absecon, New Jersey 
3 W. Stanton St., Baldwin, New York 
115 'Claremont St., Newton, Massachusetts 
106 N. Elmwood St., Peoria, Illinois 

124 Madeline Ave., Clifton, New Jersey 

406 Arena Ave., Lima, Ohio 

227 Franklin St., Tonawanda, New York 

110 Lake Drive, Mountain Lakes, New Jersey 
3746 S. Kedzie Ave., Chicago, Illinois 

6921 Oglesby Ave., Chicago, Illinois 
202 W. Crawford St., Elkhart, Indiana 
921 W. 33rd Place, Chicago, Illinois 
1938 Buffalo Road, Erie, Penna. 
3324 E. 88th St., Chicago, Illinois 



Army Specialized Training Program 

3327th Service Unit 

Basic Engineering, Foreign Area and Language Studies 

MILITARY STAFF 

Name Home Address 

Capt. Darryl W. Travis, 

Inf., Commandant 3616Heekin Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio 

2nd Lt. Edward J. Schiffler, 

A. U. S. Adjutant 2202 N. 63rd St., Wauwatosa, Wisconsin 

2nd Lt. Wesley R. McClana- 

han, A. U. S., Training R. D. No. 3, Enid, Oklahoma 
2nd Lt. Herbert 0. Carlson, 

A. U. S., Supply 5319 Glenwood Ave., Chicago, Illinois 

2nd Lt. John A. Clark, 

A.G.D., Classification 56 Leighton Road, Wellesley, Massachusetts 

PERMANENT PARTY 

Name Home Address 

1/Sgt. David R. Miller 845 Chestnut St., Hagerstown, Maryland 

S/Sgt. Russell G. Doran 3530 N. Ella St., Philadelphia, Penna. 

T/4 Henry D. Patterson Box No. 1, Manor, Penna. 

Cpl. J. Hunter McDowell 723 Windermere Ave., Drexel Hill, Penna. 

Pfc. Norman C. Bull 908 2nd St., Pocomoke City, Maryland 

Pfc. Barner R. Deckard Liverpool, JPenna. 

Pvt. Gerald C. Cohen 1807 N. 57th St., Philadelphia, Penna. 

FACULTY 

"^ (Basic Engineering) 

Allendoerfer, Carl B. — Academic Director 

Comfort, Elizabeth W. (Mrs. Howard) — English 

Drake, Thomas E. — History 

Hetzel, Theodore B. — Physics 

Jones, Thomas 0. — Chemistry 

Kirk, David B. — Mathematics 

La Fleur, Albert A. — Geography 

Le Galley, Donald P. — Physics 

Lunt, William E. — History 

Snyder, Edward D. — English 

Vedova, George C. — Mathematics 

(Foreign Area and Language Studies) 

Caselli, Aldo — Italian 

Comfort, Elizabeth W. (Mrs. Howard) — Italian 

Comfort, Howard — Italian, Academic Director 

Dodson, LeonidUs — German 

Foss, Martin — German 

Frey, William T. — German 

Lafford, Mrs. Lindsay A. — German 

Lograsso, Miss Angeline — Italian 

Nova, Fritz — German, Italian 

Oberholtzer, Mrs. Beatrice — Italian 

Pfund, Mrs. Harry W. — German 

Pfund, Harry W. — German, Academic Director 

La Fleur, Albert A. — Geography 

Ohl, Raymond T. — Italian 

Salomone, William — Italian 

Stokes, Samuel E., Jr. — Italian 

Vittorini, Domenico — Italian 



Army Specialized Training Program 

3327th Service Unit 

Basic Engineering, Foreign Area and Language Studies 



Name 

Adams, John T. 
Alovis, Daniel I. 
Ampel, David 
Anderson, Stanley 
Ariey, August A., Jr. 
Atkinson, Griffin A. . 
Baecker, August H. 
Bailey, David C. 
Bandino, Salvatore J. 
Barringer, William G. 
Bartel, Elmer E. 
Baum, Wilmer S., Jr. 
Bauman, Carl A., Jr. 
Beaulieu, Charles E. 
Bellman, William M. 
Bernardi, Eugene P. 
Bernstein, Isidore 
Bonanni, Peter J. 
Bottom, Lawrence G. 
Brandt, Jack G. 
Bristow, John W. 
Brown, Edward 0. 
Brucker, Howard 
Cane, Irving iC. 
Carr, William H. 
Carroll, Charles P. 
Casanova, Joseph A. 
Cashwell, Edgar A. 
Cebulka, Peter R. 
Clark. Randall L. 
Craighead, William J., Jr. 
Cross, William E. 
Diana, Gaetano S. 
Dickman, Irving R. 
Dion, Hubert A. 
Donaldson, Victor G. 
Doster, James H. 
DowTiing, Thomas G. 
Dunn, Crawford B., Jr. 
Edwards, J. Gordon 
Effinger, Ceroid J. 
Engler, Charles 
Eyre, William H. 
Fain, Charles L. 
Farrell, John R. 
Fiduccia. Charles B. 
Finch, William R. 
Finley, John T. 
Finney, John F. 
Flynn, Arthur E., Jr. 
Forbes, John S. 
Frankl, Gunther 



STUDENTS 

Home Address 

882 iChicopee St., Chicopee, Massachusetts 

611 W. 158th St., New York, N. Y. 

448 Empire Blvd., Brooklyn, New York 

1649 Balmoral Ave., Chicago, Illinois 

2310 P St., Bakersfield, California 

K. D. No. 1, Blacklick, Ohio 

12175 Ilene Ave., Detroit, Michigan 

12 Griffing Blvd, Asheville, North Carolina 

579 59th St., West New York. New Jersey 

500 E. Madison St., Belvidere, Illinois 

805 N. 22nd St., Milwaukee, Wisconsin 

412 Oxford Road, Brookline, Penna. 

29 Hilltop Road, Asheville, North Carolina 

107 Bumside Ave., East Hartford, Connecticut 

425 Brockway, Albion, Michigan 

1143 Vine Ave., Williamsport, Penna. 

156 9th St., Brooklyn, New York 

540 Hudson St., Trenton, New Jersey 

165 Oxford St., Auburn, Massachusetts 

2142 Madison Ave., S. E., Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Hillburn, New York 

2830 Benton Blvd., Minneapolis, Minnesota 

500 W. 190th St., New York, N. Y. 

1244 Grand Concourse, New York, N. Y. 

4736 Forest Ave., Downers Grove, Illinois 

Route No. 2, Kingston, Tennessee 

76 Dayton St., Quincy, Massachusetts 

Saxapahaw, North Carolina 

Hawk Run, Penna. 

520 N. Duke St., Lancaster, Penna. 

1472 Rackway Ave., Lakewood, Ohio 

27 Barton St., Mayville, New York 

656 E. 229th St., Bronx, New York 

2794 Valentine Ave., Bronx, New York 

512 Simonton, Key West, Florida 

522 N. 73rd St., Seattle, Washington 

324 S. Broadway, Barnesville, Ohio 

1150 E. 29th St., Brooklyn, New York 

1839 Clermont St., Mobile, Alabama 

3054 Broadway, Indianapolis, Indiana 

430 W. Carey St., Philadelphia, Penna. 

11251/2 S. Citrus St., Los Angeles, California 

Saxon Ave., Islip, New York 

Route No. 3, Weatherford, Texas 

131 W. Louther St., Carlisle, Penna. 

6214 N. Lakewood Ave., Chicago, Illinois 

834 Broadway St., Dyersburg, Tennessee 

933 Frost Court. Peekskill, New York 

326 N. 3rd St., Lehighton, Penna. 

Herrick Center, Penna. 

308 6th St., Watkins Glen, New York 

70-01 113th St., Forest Hills, New York 



Name 

Ganapoler, Paul 
Genova, Joseph P. 
Gerretson, Merlin W. 
Giebler, Albert G. 
Gilbert, Shelley W., Jr. 
Guerra, Rafael A. 
Guidi, Americus R. 
Hallberg, Robert C. 
Haroian, Henry 
Harrington, Edwin 
Harris, James W. 
Hatley, George D. 
Hauptman, Donald K. 
Heartsill, Walter C. 
Heckert, Robert W. 
Heitmann, Frederick W. 
Henoch, Rolph E. 
Herman, Jack C. 
Hopkins, Samuel C. 
Horlick, Max 
Hummel, Raymond iC. 
Hunt, John W. 
Hutter, Robert T. 
Hynes, Frank J. 
Ingbretson, Allen E. 
Ingraham, Ross W. 
Irwin, Roy D. 
Jackel, Hans A. 
Johnston, Theodore W. 
Kahn, Warren W. 
Kalmus, Fred 
Kamhi, Joseph 
Karp, Melvin S. 
Karpick, Harry 
Kidd, Jackson M. 
Klekman, Eugene H. 
Kline, Harold E. 
Klugh, Arthur M., Jr. 
Knapp, George G. P. 
Lacroix, Edouard C. 
Landrey, Joseph C. 
Lapointe, Raoul 
Le Fevi'e, Warren H. 
Leister, Raymond C. 
Leon, Felix 
Levin, Morris L. 
Linahan, John R. 
Lombard, Lee R. 
Lombardo, Frank M. 
McBride, William 
McBrien, William K. 
McCarthy, Walter D., Jr. 
McCoy, James H. 
McDermott, Thomas E., Jr. 
McDonald, Edward J., Jr. 
McGuffee, Walter B. 
McKeough, John E. 
Maffei, Pasquale A. 
Maloney, John B. 



Home Address 

2711 Whiteplains Ave., New York, N. Y. 

398 Division St., Amsterdam, New York 

24 W. Jefferson Ave., Waupun, Wisconsin 

308 W. 16th St., Hays, Kansas 

6450 University Ave., Chicago, Illinois 

General Delivery, Linn, Texas 

236 W. Grand St., Elizabeth, New Jersey 

1205 Cherry St., Vicksburg, Mississippi 

55 Kondazian St., Watertown, Massachusetts 
Sheaff Lane, Whitemarsh, Penna. 

1406 St. Stephens Road, Mobile, Alabama 
Hudson, North Carolina 

74 S. Main St., Spring Valley, New York 
521 S. Rosemont, Dallas, Texas 

1843 Mulberry St., Harrisburg, Penna. 

1 Longfellow Lane, Houston, Texas 

255 W. 84th St., New York, N. Y. 

1510 Louisa St., Williamsport, Penna. 

Whitford, Penna. 

R. D. No. 4, New Brunswick, New Jersey 

107-28 121st St., Richmond Hill, New York 

1752 N. St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

3408 Culver Road, Rochester, New York 

206 Greenway Ave., Darby, Penna. 

518-A South Barnekow Road, Wauwatosa, Wis. 

R. D. No. 1, Lafayette, California 

8752 96th St., Woodhaven, New York 

2215 Kendall Ave., Madison, Wisconsin 

I Fort Charles Place, New York, N. Y. 
6541 Saunders St., Forest Hills, New York 
229 W. 97th St., New York, N. Y. 

677 Sheffield Ave., Brooklyn, New York 
69 S. Welles St., Wilkes-Barre, Penna. 
604 Goodyear Ave., Buffalo, New York 
216 N. Elmwood, Oak Park, Illinois 
109-15 Queens Blvd., Flushing, New York 
2054 Swatara St., Harrisburg, Penna. 
175 N Ave., Anderson, South Carolina 

3 Alden Place, Bronxville, New York 

II Champney St., Brighton, Massachusetts 

29 Azel Road, South Braintree, Massachusetts 

84 Russell St., Winooski, Vermont 

1200 Kenmore Ave., Los Angeles, California 

1506 Center St., Ashland, Penna. 

2200 Grand Ave., Bronx, New York 

156 W. Dennick Ave., Youngstown, Ohio 

4 Englewood Road, Upper Darby, Penna. 
532 W. 114th St., New York, N. Y. 

1206 Admiral, Kansas City, Missouri 

11 Holly St., Lawrence, Massachusetts 

75 Momingside Park, Springfield, Massachusetts 

56 Forest St., Fitchburg, Massachusetts 

17 E. Charlotte Ave., Sumter, South Carolina 

305 Wethersfield Ave., Hartford, Connecticut. 

Pond Road, Ronkonkoma, New York 

R. F. D., Boguechitto, Mississippi 

179 S. Park Ave., Fond du Lac, Wisconsin 

41 Butler St., Trenton, New Jersey 

1016 Beloit Ave., Forest Park, Illinois 



Name 

Manders, Donald C. 
Maniatis, James P. 
Mautner, Milton S. 
Meade, Ralph L. 
Media, John E. 
Menzietti, Anthony P. 
Merriman, James J. 
Miller, Stanley W. 
Monter, John C. 
Morano, Nicholas F. 
Moriarty, John E. 
Morris, Irvine E. 
Moskowitz, Saul 
Moss, Alfred L. 
Murphy, Paul E. 
Nagel, Karl H. 
Neckowitz, Fred 
Neill, Paul V. 
Nelson, Charles B. 
Neufeld, Arthur I. 
Noll, Howard D. 
Norris, Edward D. 
O'Hanlon, John F. 
Oliver, William H. 
O'Neill, 'Charles G. 
Ortiz, Rafael A. 
Pelunis, Daniel D. 
Percival, Leroy F., Jr. 
Perkins, Lawrence B. 
Phillips, Stanley W. 
Pinkerton, Edward C. 
Pomerantz, Emil 
Prati, Joe, Jr. 
Precure, DeWitt A. 
Rand, Sidney 
Reiner, Kermit T. 
Rennels, James W., Jr. 
Richaixison, John C. 
Richman, Julius J. 
Rogers, Frank C, Jr. 
Rose, Bernd P. 
Rosenberg, Jack 
Ross, John B. 
Rubenstein, Isadore 
Rubin, William A. 
Russell, David W. 
Safran, Howard D. 
Sample, William R. 
Schmidt, Clifford G. 
Schnakenberg, Richard J. 
Schwartz, Kessel 
Shapiro, Murry 
Shufelt, John A. 
Siegel, Julius 
Slomowitz, Sidney 
Smith, Eugene E. 
Smith, William L. 
Smith, William R. 
Spevack, Edward 



Home Address 

3848 Harrison St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

2042 Grand Ave., Bronx, New York 

3925 65th St., Woodside, New York 

111 Bailey Road, Yeadon, Penna. 

9920 Anderson Ave., Cleveland, Ohio 

382 Carol Ave., Bridgeville, Penna. 

88 W. 47th St., Bayonne, New Jersey 

46 Hiawatha Road, Mattapan, Massachusetts 

1916 Lincoln Ave., Yakima, Washington 

117 Dewitt Place, Ithaca, New York 

63 Williams St., Bellows Falls, Vermont 

199 E. Lake Drive, S. E., Atlanta, Georgia 

125 E. 31st St., Brooklyn, New York 

307 S. Center St., Flora, Indiana 

40 Downing St., Hingham, Massachusetts 

Route No. 1, Stockton, New Jersey 

109 Amboy St., Brooklyn, New York 

1 Grove St., Randolph, Vermont 

1243 Judson Ave., Evanston, Illinois 

423 11th St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

96 Curtis St., Quincy, Massachusetts 

306 Oriole Drive, Chattanooga, Tennessee 

312 76th St., Brooklyn, New York 

1519 Druid Hill Drive, Birmingham, Alabama 

109 Quincy Ave., Kearny, New Jersey 

1840 S. Broadway, Wichita, Kansas 

245 E. 180th St., New York, N. Y. 

305 Central St., Forestville, Connecticut 

Box No. 338, Canaan, Connecticut 

71 Bonnie Brae Ave., Brighton, New York 

Bond Hotel, Hartford, Connecticut 

2141 46th St., Astoria, New York 

Route No. 37, El Paso, Texas 

Box No. 767, Muleshoe, Texas 

1108 Findlay Ave., New York, N. Y. 

89-19 Sutphin Blvd., Jamaica, New York 

509 E. State St., Alliance, Ohio 

37 Fisher St., Dover, New Hampshire 

801 West End Ave., New York, N. Y. 

47 Axtell Drive, Scarsdale, New York 

609 Maple Lane, Sewickley, Penna. 

486 Brooklyn Ave., Brooklyn, New York 

3510 N. E. Bryce, Portland, Oregon 

864 42nd St., Brooklyn, New York 

76 Ross St., Brooklyn, New York 

2375 N. 4th St., Columbus, Ohio 

1751 York St., Denver, Colorado 

220 Michigan Ave., Daytona Beach, Florida 

400 Lakeview Ave., Clifton, New Jersey 

3534 N. Bell Ave., Chicago, Illinois 

3712 Wabash St., Kansas City, Missouri 

556 E. 4th St., Brooklyn, New York 

69 Church St., Chatham, New York 

2258 Ocean Ave., Brooklyn, New York 

234 Legion St., Brooklyn, New York 

709 E. Poythress St., Hopewell, Virginia 

35 Lyndon Road, Edgewood, Rhode Island 

233 Connell St., Wilmington, Delaware 

415 Monroe St., Carlstadt, New Jersey 



Name 

Stanton, Wilbur G. 
Stegall, Emmett E. 
Stombellini, Frank C. 
Stransky, Sidney 
Swan, Edward V. 
Trotter, Richard G. 
Trout, Joseph J. 
Tucker, Arthur W., Jr. 
Tucker, Charlie A., Jr. 
Turner, James W., Jr. 
Vaccara, John F., Jr. 
van-der-Berg, Herbert I 
Veal, Lemuel D. 
Verbo, Nicholas 
Visser, Edwin 
Voiron, Roger 
Waddell, William C. 
Walmer, Paul M. 
Warner, Wendell L. 
Weikel, DeWitt C, Jr. 
Weill, Maurice F. 
Weintraub, Charles W. 
White, Roger P. 
Wiener, Sol 
Wolf, William K. 
Zamost, Benjamin F. 
Zehms, Karl H. 
Zimmerman, Harold E. 



Home Address 

R. D. No. 1, New Milford, Penna. 

Chester Pike, Richmond, Indiana 

541 Ryerson Ave., Wood Ridge, New Jersey 

620 Quebec Place, N. W., Washington, D. C. 

368-20th Ave., Paterson, New Jersey 

2717 Grand Ave., Fort Smith, Arkansas 

49 W. 73rd St., New York, N. Y. 

Route No. 4, Mt. Pleasant, Texas 

3203 Gleason Drive, Chattanooga, Tennessee 

3219 Brunswick Ave., Drexel Hill, Penna. 

866 Coney Island Ave., Brooklyn, New York 

4220 Massachusetts Ave., Baltimore, Mai-yland 

Hosford, Florida 

314 Cross St., Philadelphia, Penna. 

206 E. 16th St., New York, N. Y. 

139-19 34th Road, Flushing, New York 

565 W. 192nd St., New York, N. Y. 

112 S. 1st, Herington, Kansas 

1367 Frackleton Place, Eagle Rock, California 

Norristown, Penna. 

135-A West 168th St., Bronx, New York 

29 Douglas Court, Huntington, New York 

5020 4th Ave., Los Angeles, California 

646 Essex St., Brooklyn, New York 

40 Oxford Road, New Rochelle, New York 

323 N. 4th Ave., Highland Park, New Jersey 

620 N. 156th, Sheboygan, Wisconsin 

627 W. Main St., Mechanicsburg, Penna. 



HAVERFORD 
COLLEGE 
BULLETIN 



REPORT OF THE 
TREASURER OF THE CORPORATION 

1942-43 




VOLUME XLII 



NUMBER TWO 



Twelfth Month • 1943 



THE CORPORATION OF 

HAVERFORD 
COLLEGE 

1942-1943 



Report of 
TREASURER OF THE CORPORATION 

For the Year Ending Eighth Month 31, 1943 




HAVERFORD -PENNSYLVANIA 



CORPORATION OF HAVERFORD COLLEGE 

Officers 

Morris E. Leeds, President 4901 Stenton Ave., Gerniantown, Phila. 

Felix M. Morley, President of the College . Haverford, Pa. 

J. Henry Scattergood, Treasurer 1616 Walnut St., Phila. 

John Flagg Gummere, Secretary W. School Lane and Fox Ave., Phila. 



Members of the Standing Nominating 
Committee of the Corporation 

Term Expires 1944 

Stanley R. Yarnall 5337 Knox St., Gerniantown, Phila. 

Thomas Shipley Brown Westtown, Pa. 

C. Reed Gary EUet Lane & Wissahickon Ave., Mt. Airy, Phila. 

Term Expires 1945 

William W. Comfort Haverford, Pa. 

Lovett Dewees Sweetwater Farm, Glen Mills, Pa. 

Theodore B. Hetzel 768 College Avenue, Haverford, Pa. 

Term Expires 1946 

Harris G. Haviland 16th and Race Sts., Phila. 

Archibald Macintosh 3 College Circle, Haverford, Pa. 

Jonathan M. Steere 1318 Girard Trust Bldg., Phila. 



BOARD OF MANAGERS 
1943 - 1944 

Ex-offlcio as Officers of Corporation 

Morris E. Leeds, President 4901 Stenton Ave., Phila. 

J. Henry Scattergood, Treasurer 1616 Walnut Street, Phila. 

John Flagg Gummere, Secretary W. School Lane and Fox Ave., Phila. 

Term Expires 1944 

J. Stogdell Stokes Stokes and Smith Co., Summerdale, Phila. 

M. Albert Linton 46th and Market Sts., Phila. 

Francis R. Taylor 910 Girard Trust Bldg., Phila. 

Edward Woolman Haverford, Pa. 

Thomas W. Elkinton 121 So. 3rd St., Phila. 

Dr. S. Emlen Stokes Moorestown, N.J. 

Henry Carter Evans 635 Manatawna Ave., Roxboro, Phila. 

William M. Maier Bailey Building, Phila. 

Term Expires 1945 

Charles J. Rhoads Ithan Road, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Edward W. Evans 304 Arch St., Phila. 

William A. Battey Liberty Trust Building, Phila. 

Dr. Frederic C. Sharpless Rosemont, Pa. 

John A. Silver Olney P.O., Phila. 

Alfred Busselle 347 Madison Ave., New York, N.Y. 

Walter C. Janney 1529 Walnut St., Phila. 

William B. Bell Rockefeller Plaza, New York, N.Y. 

Term Expires 1946 

Frederic H. Strawbridge 801 Market St., Phila. 

Jonathan M. Steere 1318 Girard Trust Bldg., Phila. 

L. Hollingsworth Wood 103 Park Ave., New York, N.Y. 

Stanley R. Yarnall 5337 Knox St., Germantown, Phila. 

William Wistar Comfort Haverford, Pa. 

Dr. Henry M. Thomas, Jr 1201 N. Calvert St., Baltimore, Md. 

Alexander C. Wood, Jr 511 Chestnut St., Phila. 

Harold Evans 1000 Provident Trust Bldg.', Phila. 

Alumni Representatives 

John K. Garrigues, Term expires 1944 1102 Westover Road, 

Westover Hills, Wilmington, Del. 

Paul Van Reed Miller, Term expires 1945 Girard Trust Bldg., Phila. 

Owen B. Rhoads, Term expires 1945 Packard Bldg., Phila. 

William Nelson West III, Term expires 1946 . . 1 104 Stock Exchange Bldg., Phila. 

Faculty Representatives 
Term Expires 1944 Term Expires 1946 

Cletus O. Oakley D. P. Lockwood 

Chairman of Board Secretary of Board 

Morris E. Leeds Edward W. Evans 



Haverford College 

Standing Committees of the Board of Managers of 
THE Corporation of Haverford College 



Executive Committee 

J. Stogdell Stokes, Chairman Walter C. Janney 

J. Henky Scattergood W. Nelson West, 3rd 

Jonathan M. Steere Dr. S. Emlen Stokes 

Alexander C. Wood, Jr. Thomas W. Elkinton 

Dr. F"rederic C. Sharpless Paul V. R. Miller 



Committee on Finance and Investments 

Jonathan M. Steere, Chairman Dr. S. Emlen Stokes 

J. Henry Scattergood M. Albert Linton 

Ale.xander C. Wood, Jr. John K. Garrigues 
William B. Bell 



Committee on Audit and Accounts 

William A. Battey, Chairman Willlxm M. Maier 

Francis R. Taylor W. Nelson West, 3rd 

Harold Evans 



Committee on College Property and Farm 

Henry C. Ev.\ns, Chairman Edward Woolman 

Frederic H. Strawbridge Alfred Busselle 

Thomas W. Elkinton William M. Maier 

William A. Battey Owen B. Rhoads 
John A. Silver 



Committee on Honorary Degrees 

William W. Comfort, Chairman Stanley R. Yarnall 

L. Hollingsworth Wood Francis R. Taylor 

Dr. Henry M. Thomas, Jr. M. Albert Linton 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 



Felix M. Morley 

A.B., Haverford College; B.A., Oxford University: Ph.D., Brookings Insiilution: L.L.D., 
Hamilton College and University of Pennsylvania; Litt.D., George Washington University 

President 
Archibald MacIntosh 

A.B., Haverford College; M..A., Columbia University 
Vice President, and Director of Admissions 

Thomas C. Gibb 

A.B., Dickinson College; .^.M.. Haverford College 
Acting Dean 

William Mintzer Wills 

A.B., A.M., Haverford College 
Comptroller and Registrar 

Dean Putnam Lockwood 

A.B., A.M., and Ph.D., Harvard University 
Librarian 

Robert J. Johnston 
Superintendent 

, Herbert William Taylor 

A.B., Haverford College; M.D., University of Pennsylvania 
Physician in Charge 

Louis C. Green 

A.B., A.M., and Ph.D., Princeton University 
Director of the Strawbridge Memorial Observatory 

Thomas Edward Drake 

A.B., Stanford University; M..\.. University of Michigan; Pli.D., Vale University 

Curator of the Quaker Collection 
Brinton H. Stone 

A.B., Johns Hopkins University; M.A., Columbia University 
Assistant to the President 

Richard Howell 
Steward 

Amy L. Post 

A.B., Earlham College 
Assistant Librarian 

Mabel S. Beard 

R.N., Lankenau Hospital 

Resident Nurse 

Mary L. Scaife 
Secretary to the President 



Note — For List of Faculty, see Catalogue 1943-1944 



Haverford College 



SUMMARY OF THE ACCOUNT OF 
J. Henry Scatteegood, Treasurer of 

THE CORPORATION OF HAVERFORD COLLEGE 

For the Year Ending Eighth Month }1 , 19^3 

RECEIPTS 



Income From Funds For General Purposes 

General Endovmient Fund 

John Farnum Memorial Fund 

John M. Whitall Fund 

David Scull Fund 

Edward L. Scull Fund 

Wistar Morris Memorial Fund 

Israel Franklin Whitall Fund 

Jacob P. Jones Endowment Fund 

John Farnum Brown Fund 

Ellen Wain Fund 

Clementine Cope Endowment Fund 

Nathan Branson Hill Fund 

Joseph E. Gillingham Fund 

Henry Norris Fund 

Elizabeth H. Farnum Fund 

James R. Magee Fund 

Albert K. Smiley Fund 

Hinchman Astronomical Fund 

W. D. & E. M. L. Scull Fund 

Albin Garrett Memorial Fund 

Arnold Chase Scattergood Memorial Fund 

Francis B. Gummere Memorial Fund.... 

Isaac Sharpless Memorial Fund 

General Education Board Fund 

Centenary Fund 

William Penn Foundation 

Walter Carroll Brinton Memorial Fund 

Corporation Fund 

Elizabeth J. Shortr idge Fund 

Howard Comfort Memorial Fund 

Emma Ridgway Comly Fund 

Ellen W. Longstreth Fund 

Albert L. Baily Fund 

Elizabeth B. Wistar Warner Fund 

T. Allen Hilles Bequest 

Leonard L. Grief Jr. & Roger L. Grief Fund. 

Edward M. Wistar Fund 

Morris E. Leeds Fund 

J. Henry Scattergood Fund 

Forwa rd 



13 



,513. li| 

,766.01 

i^93.52 

,078.27 

327.11 

238.61 

500.10 

,361.95 

,797.11 

515.65 

996.95 

136.1^6 

,966.40 

273.01 

322.71 

,0i|-8.75 

69.57 

,832.85 

,096.66 

,2^1-1.72 

,130.90 

,82^1.31 

,1^5.32 

,847.8lJ- 

11.12 

,73^.21 

655.20 

,711.12 

1^63.83 

233.18 

,318.58 

,863. i^9 

231.92 

229.60 

,022.75 

if6.38 

115.96 

,898.02 

78.92 



156,339.20 



Haverford College 



Forward $ 156 ,339 .20 

Income From Fund For T. Wlstar Brown 
Graduate School 

Moses Brown Fund 16,34-0.70 

Income From Fumds For Morris Infirmary 

Inf irmary Endowment Fund H-k-"] . 7 6 

John W. Pinkham Fund 234.68 682.4-4- 

Income From Fund For Haverford Union 



Haverford Union Fund 87 .15 

Income From Funds For Scholarships 

Thomas P. Cope Fund 243.87 

Edward Yarnall Fund 2 81 .5 1 

Isaiah V. Williamson Fund 919 .19 

Richard T. Jones Scholarship Fund 234.53 

Mary M. Johnson Scholarship Fund 325 .3I 

Sarah Marshall Scholarship Fund 367 .34 

Clementine Cope Fellowship Fund 1,059.66 

Isaac Thorne Johnson Scholarship Fund 372 .34 

Caspar Wistar Memorial Fund I36 . 89 

J. Kennedy Moorhouse Scholarship Fund 239 .l4 

Louis Jaquette Palmer Scholarship Fiind 231.92 

Paul W. Newhall Memorial Scholarship Fund 234.03 

Robert Martin Zuckert Memorial Scholarship Fund 7I3.IO 

Samuel E. Hilles Scholarship Fund 232.72 

Class of 1913 Scholarship Fund 139 .15 

Class of 1917 Scholarship Fund 99.45 5,830.15 

Income From Funds For Library 

Alimini Library Fund 808.69 

Mary Farnum Brown Library Fund 3 ,082 .50 

William H. Jenks Library Fimd 231.92 

Mary Wistar Brown Williams Library Fund 94l .89 

Anna Yarnall Fund 7,921.59 

F. B. Gummere Library Fund 29.48 

Edmund Morris Fergusson, Jr. Memorial Fund 46.49 

Class of 1888 Library Fund 266.73 

Class of 1918 Library Fund 58. l4 13 ,387 .43 

Income From Funds For Old Style Pensions 

President Sharpless Fund 1 ,912 .7I 

William P. Henszey Fimd 1,704.98 

Jacob P. Jones Benefit Fund 3,159.33 

Pliny Earle Chase Memorial Fund I5I.78 

Haverford College Pension Fund 5 ,196.81 12 ,125 -61 

Forward 204,792.68 



Haverford College 



Forward $ 204-,792.68 

Income From Funds For Special Purposes 

Thomas Shipley Fund 24-3 ,4-2 

Elliston P. Morris Fund 32 .26 

John B. Garrett Reading Prize Fund IO5 .39 

Special Endowment Fund iJ-27.98 

Scholarship Improvement Prize Fund IO6 .3^ 

Elizabeth P. Smith Fund 80. 90 

S. P. Lippincott History Prize Fund II8.I3 

Francis Stokes Fund 237 -30 

George Peirce Prize Fund 98.67 

Lyman Beecher Hall Prize Fund 99-96 

Newton Prize Fund 64 . 83 

Edward B . Conklin Athletic Fund Ill .32 

Arboretum Fund 212 .79 

William Ellis Scull Prize Fund 92.77 

Paul D.I. Maier Fund 4-6.38 

Strawbridge Observatory Maintenance Fund I78.O9 

Jacob & Eugenie Bucky Memorial Foundation 95 .93 

Mathematics Department Prize Fund 9.l4- 2 ,382.02 

Income From The Funds For The College 207,174.70 

Income From Special Trust 

Augustus Taber Murray Research Scholarship Fund 932 .16 

Total Income From All Funds 208,126.86 

Income From College Sources 

Tuition - Cash 103,273.23 

Scholarships Donated 4,238.00 

Scholarships From Funds 12,964.13 122,473.4-0 

Board - From Students 71,379.37 

From U. S. Officers 4, 334-. 37 73,933-94- 

Room Rents - From Students 39 ,303 .37 

From U. S. Officers 2,196.93 41,302-30 

Re -examination Fees 34l .00 

Miscellaneous Fees 909.98 

Board of Professors 1,721.25 

Rentals I3 , 34l .50 

Infirmary 538.99 

Library 34-3 -4-3 

Biological Laboratory 959.85 

Chemical Laboratory 4-, 119. 93 

Physics Laboratory 1,388.12 

Engineering Laboratory 2,599.66 

Music Department l48 .50 

Observatory I70 .07 

Mathematics Department 5 .00 

Haverford Review 286.85 267,383-77 

Forward 473,312.63 



Haverford College 

Forward $ i^-75 ,312.63 

Accelerated S\iinmer Term - 19^3 - Uncompleted 

Tuition 18,993.92 

Board 11,353.60 

Rooms 5 ,165.01 

Donation for Faculty Salary 260.00 33 ,772 .33 

Pre-Meteorology Unit - Uncompleted 

From U. S. Government 

Instruction 39,727.1^ 

Subsistence 38,682.30 

Maintenance and Operation 9,268.22 

Use of Facilities 9,308.13 

Medical Services 1,3^6.88 

Activating Costs 23,116.07 1^3,8^8.9^ 

From Sale of Books 388.38 lW,237.32 

Donations other than for Funds 

For Prizes 

Class of 1902 Latin Prizes 4-0.00 

Glass of 1910 Poetry Prizes 100.00 14-0.00 

For Library 

Matzke Royalties 38.37 

Miscellaneous Library Gifts 76. 60 

Friend of the Library - Anonymous 73O.OO 884.97 

For Music and Art 

Carnegie Corporation 8,000.00 

Other Receipts IO3.2I 8,103.21 

For Scholarships 

New England Alumni 3OO .00 

Isaac Sharpless Scholarships from 

Alumni Association 3OO ,00 

Alvord Foundation 7OO.OO 

Walter Hollander - return of 

Corporation Scholarship I3O.OO 

Boyertown Public School..^ 3O.OO 

Anonymous for 194-3-44. .. .* 46.00 

S. Guggenheim Foundation 200.00 

American Friends Service Committee.. 600.00 

U. S. Bureau of Education 3OO.OO 

Anonymous 1 , 100 . 00 

Anonymous - for Summer Term 

Scholarship 1,300.00 

Anonymous - for Special 

Scholarships 2 ,000.00 

Edward Woolman 60.00 7,706.00 

For Travel Expense 30th Class Reunion 

from Edward Woolman 40 .00 

For Campus Club 486.30 

For Care of Cope Field % .00 331-30 

For Roberts Hall Electrical Equipment.. 2 36 . 43 

For Engineering Equipment I30 .00 

For Field House 932 .12 

For Gummere-Morley Room in New Library 

from Class of 1892 228.94 

For Maintenance Government & 

Language Houses II5 .00 

For Inauguration of Government House... 33O.OO 2, 012 .3I 

Forward 19,4l8.19 655,522.48 

10 



Haverford College 



Forward $ ig.^J-lS.l? G53 ,322 M 

Donations other than for Funds (continued) 



For Lecture 

For Salaries 

For Summer Term Salary 

For Haverford Review - from Alumni Association 

For Educational Miscellaneous 

For Prize Essay 

For Premeteorology Award 

Class of 193^ Gift, as yet Undesignated 

Morris E. Leeds Gift , Undesignated 

Special Gift for General Purposes 

For Reconstruction and Relief 

Radio Club - Interest added 

Deficit on Collection Speakers - Educational Misc 

For Library - New Stack Addition 

For Triangle Society Gift:- 

Realized from Stock Donated 11,023.23 

Dividends on Stock Donated 63O.OO 

Donated for salary paid from this gift.. 100 .00 

Additions to the Funds 



100.00 

1,068.25 

260.00 

ni.50 

50.00 

100.00 

25.00 

4-48. i;i 

2,000.00 

200.00 

300.00 

61.60 

33.23 

3,408.59 



11,755.23 39,4-00.00 



Ellen W. Longstreth Fund - Further realization on 

legacy 

Moses Brown Fund - Income capitalized 

Isaac Thorne Johnson Scholarship Fund - Income 

capitalized 

Class of 1917 Scholarship Fund - Donated 

Class of 1917 Scholarship Fund - Income capitalized.... 
Mary Farniun Brown Library Fund - Income capitalized.... 

Anna Yarnall Fund - Further realization on legacy 

George Peirce Prize Fund - Income capitalized 

Jacob & Eugenie Bucky Foundation - Income 

capitalized 

Mathematics Department Prize Fund - Donated (new) 

Mathematics Department Prize Fund - Income 

capitalized 

Miscellaneous Receipts * 

Receipts from Skating Pond 

Merlon Title & Trust Company in liquidation on 

a/c deposit a/c 5^ 

Griffin Lane Apartments - Rents , 

Student Reimbursement Insurance 

Haverford Students Store - Received on a/c 

Repayment - a/c advance to Student Loan Fund 

From Bryn Mawr College - a/c Professor Loaned 

Student Activities - Fees collected , 

Victory and Other Taxes Withheld 

Reserve for Language House Alterations applied 

Reserve for Kitchen Alterations applied 

Forwa rd 

*Note: The United States Office of Education has conducted 
Engineering, Science and Management Defense Training 
at the College to an amount of $9,551-35 during the 
year. This is not- included in the accounts of the 
College. Also $2,278.00 has been received on account 
of the Fiscal Year 1943-44. 



166.80 
1,634.07 

72.3^ 
262.50 
116.08 
386.81 
449.31 

i^8.67 

95.95 

900.00 



9.l4 4,l4l.67 



230.90 

522.48 

272.30 

1,612.00 

3.38 

5,000.00 

1,000.00 

3,997.50 

10,610.25 

511.87 

2.501.03 



26,261.71 
725,325.86 



11 



Haverford College 



Forward $ 725,325.86 

Items Relating to Other Fiscal Years 

Old Bills Collected 117-70 

Room Rents 19^3-W received in advance 120 .00 

Advance on Salary repaid I,if00.00 

Goal for 19^2-^3 bought in advance applied 2,117.63 

Prepaid Insurance Applied 1,9^9.68 

Expenses prepaid refunded 1,188.31 6,893.32 

Investments Realized 

Consolidated Investments Account 

Bonds - Industrial 11,120.00 

Public Utility 5^,383.65 
Railroad 1^)^6,628.15 

Miscellaneous 526.1^ 212,657.9^ 

Stocks - Preferred 

Public Utility 23,1+89.87 

Stocks - Common 

Railroad 15 ,530. '+9 

Mortgages - 

Received on a/c 5l|,l62.90 

Foreclosed 2,815.00 56,977-90 

Real Estate 

Sold 30,218.36 
Siindry Receipts 320. 67 30,539-03 
Miscellaneous - Received 
on advance for house on 
campus 822.78 3^0,018.01 

John Farnum Memorial Fund 2 ,799-3^ 

Nathan Branson Hill Fund 
(First Bank ^ Trust Co. 
of Minneapolis) -(Entered 
short) $52i|-.65 

Elizabeth H. Farnum Fund 

(Provident Trust Co. Trustee) 
(Entered short) $1+60.00 

Ellen W. Longstreth - Mary Pearsall 

at al Agency a/c 6l+9 .55 

Augustus Taber Murray Research Scholarship Fund 8,01+5 .00 351,511.90 

Money Borrowed Temporarily 30 ,000 .00 

Balances 9th Month 1, 19^2 

In Trea surer ' s Ac count 67 , 3^0 . 73 

In President's Account 31,91+7-63 99.288-36 

$ 1,213,019.1+1+ 



12 



Haverford College 



EXPENDITURES 

Expenses of Running the College * 

Salaries - Instruction & Executive $180,1^1-0^3 

Library Staff 11,726.50 191,866.93 

Pension Contributions 6, 181.59 

Wages - Administrative & General 20 ,108 .7^ 

Power Plant 1^,197-37 

Residence Halls 15,067.38 

Dining Room & Kitchen 15,835-03 55,208.52 

Provisions 36,5^+2.83 

Family Expenses & Furniture 5,106.96 

Educational Miscellaneous 3 ,333-36 

Fuel & Light 18,833-51 

Water 2,^+^19-13 

Lavm & Garden 7,192 -17 

Infirmary 3,063.61 

Haverford Union .1^.50 

Library l,897.'+9 

Biological Laboratory kko .30 

Chemical Laboratory ij-,010 .19 

Physics Laboratory 1 ,552 .50 

Engineering Laboratory 2 ,53^-3'+ 

Music Department I56.66 

Observatory 188.^ 

Gymnasium and Athletics 9,757-79 

Printing and Advertising 2,177.25 

Haverford Review 1,090.66 

Entertainment Expenses 1,14-7.52 

Repairs and Improvements 20,158.9^ 

Interest 5 ,527.61 

Taxes - Regular 1,851.66 

521 Panmure Road (this year) 581.9^+ 2,^+33.60 

Insurance - Regular ^,^33-56 

Appraisal of Contents 2,000.00 6,^+33-56 

Secretary and Treasurer's Expenses 3,395-93 

Auditing Expense 5OO.OO 

Contribution (2 yrs.) to Haverford Meeting... 200.00 ^,095.93 
Miscellaneous Expense charge to Moses 

Brown Fund 100 .00 

Rent - W. D. & E. M. L. Scull Fund 3^10.00 

Rent - Government House, No. 8 College Lane.. 2,^+00.00 
Rent - Language House, No. 2 College Lane.... 1,200.00 

Rent - No. 1 College Circle 1,200.00 5 ,1^+0.00 

Regular Expenses of Running the College 398,635.85 

(Apart from Pre-meteorological Unit and 
uncompleted accelerated Summer Term 19^3 
(see below) 

*Note: These expenses are apart from amounts charged on 

various items to Summer Term and to Pre-meteorology 
as listed below. 

Forward 398 , 635 . 85 



13 



Haverford College 



Forward $ 398,635.85 

Add 

Stork Art Gift Shortage l,24-i;.00 

Second 1/6 cost of Language House Improvements 5 11. 87 

Second 1/6 cost of Kitchen Alterations 2,501.03 

Old Style Pensions 2i^-,^39.90 

Special Pensions 8IO.6O 

Annuity 1,600.00 31,107. 1|0 

Accelerated Summer Term - 19^2 , Completed 
(Additional Net Expenses as follows: ) 

Salaries - Faculty 5,97^.65 

Library 3^14. 00 

Administrative 25 6 ■ I5 6,57iJ-.80 

Wages - Power Plant 3I5 .00 

Residence Halls l,it8'+.50 

Dining Room & Kitchen 990.60 2 ,790.10 

Provisions 2 ,072 .^H- 

Family Expenses & Furniture 378.12 

Educational Miscellaneous 27.77 

Fuel and Light 388.96 

Lawn and Garden 65 .33 

Infirmary I65 .96 

Gymnasium and Athletics 599.00 

Library 95.88 

Repairs & Improvements - Screens 100.00 13,258.^6 

(Deducting these from the balance carried 
over from 19^2-^3, leaves a final credit 
balance of $16,968.60) 

Accelerated Summer Term - 19^3, Uncompleted 
All bills not yet in; figures carried 
over into Fiscal Year 19^3-^*^- 



Salaries - Faculty 5,996.78 

Library i|-66 .00 

Administration 500.00 6,962.78 

Wages - Power Plant 218.00 

Residence Halls 785 .80 

Dining Room & Kitchen 7OO.68 l,70ij-.4-8 

Provisions 3,569 .73 

Family Expenses and Furniture 50.13 

Fuel and Light 530.25 

Lawn and Garden l'J-1.9^ 

Infirmary 5 .13 

Repairs and Improvements 121.32 

Scholarships 925 .00 

(Credit Balance Accelerated Summer Term - 19't-3, 
carried forward $21,761.77) 

Forward 



it;, 010. 76 



1|57,012.47 



14 



Haverford College 



Forward $ 4-57,012.117 

Pre-meteorological Unit, Uncompleted 

Salaries - Faculty 36,393-02 

Administrative 2,858.38 

Books 7,779.68 

Educational Miscellaneous 1,97^.13 

Biological Laboratory 7^9.32 

Physics Laboratory 960-10 30,71^1-. 83 

Provisions 2 4 , 33 6 . I3 

Wages - Residence Halls 1,237.79 

Dining Room & Kitchen 7,4^3-10 33,039.0i|- 

Family Expenses and Furniture 3,593-93 

Fuel and Light 2,888.86 

Wages - Power Plant 970.63 

Water 239.'i-8 

Lawn and Garden I38 . 73 

Gymnasium and Athletics 26.36 

Printing and Advertising 6^.73 

Repairs and Improvements 693-39 

Obstacle Course 33h.GG 8,973-21 

Infirmary 739-87 

Activating Costs - Family Expenses & 

Furniture 13,861.92 

Repairs & Improvements. . 10,322.61 2^,38^.33 117,833.30 



Expenditures from Income of Funds for 
Scholarships ? Fellowships 

General Endowment Fund 873 -00 

Jacob P. Jones Endovmient Fund 6,737-30 

Joseph E. Gillingham FUnd 67O .00 

Moses Brown Fund - At Pendle Hill.. 330.00 

At Haverford 4-30.00 8OO.OO 

Thomas P. Cope Fund 4-10.00 

Ed.-.ard Yarnall Fund 123 .00 

Isaiah V. Williamson Fund 1,076.63 

Richard T. Jones Scholarship F\ind I73 .00 

Mary M. Johnson Scholarship Fund 3OO.OO 

Sarah Marshall Scholarship Fund 3OO .00 

Clementine Cope Fellowship Fund- 
Lewis Paul Saxer at Northwestern 

University -. 300.00 

Gove Hambidge at Yale Medical 

School 400.00 900.00 

Isaac Thome Johnson Scholarship Fund 3OO.OO 

Caspar Wistar Memorial Fund 100.00 

J. Kennedy Moorhouse Scholarship Fund 223-00 

Louis Jar^uette Palmer Scholarship Fund 223.00 

Paul W. Newhall Scholarship F\md 123 -00 

Robert Martin Zuckert Memorial 

Schola rship Fund 600 . 00 

Samuel E. Hilles Scholarship F\md 173 .00 

Cla ss of 1913 Schola rship Fund 93 .00 

Forward 



l4, 214.13 
l4, 214.13 



374,863-97 



15 



Haverford College 

Forward $ 14,21^1.15 $ 57'^-,865.97 

Expenditures from Income of Special Trust 

Augustus Taber Murray Research 

Scholarship Fund - Annuity 98O .00 

Expenditures from Income of Funds for Library 

W. D. & E. M. L. Scull Fund - Books 216.42 

Ellen W. Longstreth Fund - Quakeriana Books 3OO.OO 

Mary Farnum 6rovm Library Fund - 

Books - General 1,936.20 

Books - Christian Knowledge... 333-99 

Lectures 425.^0 2,695-69 

William H. Jenks Library Fund - Books 119.02 

Mary Wistar Brown Williams Library Fund - 

Books 205 . 86 

Anna Yamall Fund - Books 2,258.33 

F. B. Gummere Library Fund -Books 2.01 

Edmund Morris Fergusson Jr. Memorial Fund - 

Books 33 .55 

Class of 1888 Library Fiind - Books .42 5,831-30 

Expenditures from Income of Special Funds 

J. Henry Scattergood Fund - Lecture 3O.OO 

Thomas Shipley Fund - Lectures 215.88 

Elliston P. Morris Fund - Books., 137-10 

Special Endowment Fund - 

Friends Council on Education.. 25. 00 

Religious Education Committee. 200.00 225.00 

Scholarship Improvement Prize Fund - Prizes 95 -00 

S. P. Lippincott History Prize Fund - Books 16.06 

Francis Stokes Fund - Trees and Shrubs 56.15 

George Peirce Prize Fund - Prizes 5O.OO 

Lyman Beecher Hall Prize Fund - Prizes 100.00 

Newton Prize Fund - Books 4.23 

Prize 50.00 5^.23 

Paul D. I. Maier Fund - Prizes 20.00 

Strawbridge Observatory Maintenance Fund - 

Equipment and Telephone ,... 76. 30 1,075 -72 22,101.17 

Paid out of Donations 

For Prizes - 

Class of 1902 Latin Prize 10.00 

For Library - 

For Books from Matzke Royalties ^5-59 

For German Books from Janssen 

Foundation Gift 24,63 

For Books from Carnegie Corporation Gift 79-87 

For Books from Class of I932 Gift 

(Morgan Memorial) 2 6.07 

For Greek Books from Professor Post's 

Gift 2 . 82 

Binding Professor Jones' 0,uaker Library. 89.65 

For Books from Dr. Arthur's Gift 113.02 

For Books from Miscellaneous .Library 

Gifts 29.97 

Congressional Catalogue and Books from 

Gift of Friend of the Library 750.00 

Share of same from Gift of Morris E. 

Leeds 392.00 1,553.62 

For Music - from Carnegie Corporation Gift 

(Also for Music Salary $1000. ) b55 .6b 

For Art - from Carnegie Corporation Gift 4o .69 

Forward 2,259-97 596,967-l'J- 

16 



Haverford College 



Forward $ 2,259-97 $ 596,967.1^ 

Paid out of Donations 



For Scholarships - 

From New England Alumni 300 .00 

Isaac Sharpless Scholarships from 

Alumni Assocation 300.00 

From Alvord Foundation Gift 200.00 

From Walter Hollander's Gift 1^0 .00 

From Boyertown Public School Gift 50.00 

From S. Guggenheim Foundation Gift 200.00 

From American Friends Service Committee 

Gift 600 .00 

From United States Bureau of Education... 500.00 

From Anonymous Gi f t 1 , 100 . 00 

From Anonymous Gift for Special 

Schola rships kqo .50 

From Anonymous Gift for Summer Term 1,320.00 

From Class of 1917 Gift for Scholarship.. IO7.5O 
From Edwa rd Woolman ' s Gi f t 60.00 

Travel for 50th Class Reunion from Edward 

Woolman 's Gift 

For Campus Club 

For Field House - Invested in U. S. Bonds... 888.00 

For Gummere-Morley Room in Library from 

Gift of Class of 1892 1 ,778 .9^ 

For Maintenance - Government and Language 

Houses 115 .00 

For Furnishing Government House 277 -0^ 

For Inauguration of Government House 

For Educational Miscellaneous 

For Summer Term Salary 

For Reconstruction and Relief - 

from Janssen Foundation Gift 

from Bucky Foundation Gift 

Class of I93I1 Gift - Invested in U. S. Bonds 

For Radio Club 

From Triangle Society Gift 

Government House Alterations 2 ,127.11 

Government House Furnishings 3OO .32 

Government House Maintenance 52 .77 

Government House - Inauguration 104.30 

Government House - Maps 4-7 .05 

Department of Government 2 4 . I5 

Expenses of Special Lecturer on 

Government 38I . 60 

Model League 75 .00 

Princeton Conference 16 .50 

New Research Chemistry Laboratory 1,256.22 

Toward rent in Sharpless House 3IO .00 

New Construction (from Donations ) 

New Stacks Addition to Library 

(Final cost $126,931.20) > 

Library Old Stack Building made over for 
Quakeriana and Roberts Collection 
(From Morris E. Leeds Gift) 
(Final cost $28,336.19) 

Forwa rd 



5,558.00 

4-0.00 
i^-86.50 



350.00 


3,^08.98 

50.00 

260.00 




286.28 

i^88.99 


775.27 
^125 .50 




150.00 



^,695.02 
23.70 

137-36 



18, 109. 2'^- 



161.06 615,076.38 



17 



Haverford College 



Forward 

New Construction (from Donations) (continued] 

Fourth and Fifth Tiers of New Stack 

Building Completion and Improvements 

to Heating 

(Final cost $30,060.76) 
(From Morris E. Leeds' Gift 



$ 161.06 $ 615,076.38 



23^1-. ij-7 



Other New Construction 

Purchase of ^21 Panmure Road 
and Improvements 



Miscellaneous Expenditures 

Proceeds from Skating Pond turned over 

to Athletic Association 

Griffin Lane Apartments - Expenses advanced 

Student Reimbursement Insurance 

Haverford Student s Store - Advance 

Student Activities Expenses 

Student Affairs 6*10.52 

19^3 Year Book 1,050.00 

Haverford News 864- . 30 

Cap and Bells 317 .20 

Student Association 190. 32 

Debating 1^6 AH- 

Alumni Association 172 .00 

Insurance 39.00 

Victory and other Taxes withheld and paid 

Items Relating to Other Fiscal Years 

Room Rents 19^-^3 in advance applied 

Coal for 19*^-3-^ bought in advance 

Insurance - prepaid 



13.253-70 



230.90 
1,050.09 
1,573.00 

993.38 



3,^09.78 
10,ij-04.65 



!+,170.00 

l,37'^-.68 

213.75 



13,6i)-9.23 



17,661.80 



5,758.if3 



Investments Made 



Consolidated Investments Account 



Bonds - Industrial 2,035.00 

Public Utility l^,H-6h.83 

Railroad 115,075.53 

Preferred Stocks - 

Industrial 21,675.26 

Public Utility 4-1,126.51 

Railroad 24,123-95 

Common Stocks - 

Bank 25,882.4-6 

Industrial 56,512.86 

Public Utility 12,95^.62 

Mortgages 

Real Estate - 

Foreclosed 2,815-00 

Charges to Principal.. 666.04 



136,575-38 



,925-72 



95,349-94 
15,252.31 

3, 481.04 



Forvrard . 



337,581.39 
337,584.39 



652,145.84 



18 



Haverford College 



Forward $ 337,58iJ-.39 $ 652 ,14-5 ,84- 

Investments Made 

John Farnum Memorial Fund 2 ,307.69 

Nathan Branson Hill Fund 

(First Bank & Trust Company of 

Minneapolis - entered short) 
Investments made $500.00 

Ellen W. Longstreth Agency a/c 20. 7*^- 

Ellen W. Longstreth - Mary Pearsall 

Agency a/c 29 . 63 

Augustus Taber Murray Research Scholarship Fund... 8,138.11 3^8,080.56 

Income Transferred to Principal 

Moses Brovm Fund 1 , 63^.07 

Isaac Thorne Johnson Scholarship Fund 72.3'+ 

Class of 1917 Scholarship Fund II6 .08 

Mary Farnum Brown Library Fund 386. 81 

George Peirce Prize Fund ^8.67 

Mathematics Department Prize Fund 9 •l'+ 

Jacob & Eugenie Bucky Memorial Foundation 95 -95 2,363.06 

Borrowed Money Repaid 30,000.00 

Balances 8th Month 3I, 19*13 • 

In Treasurer's Account 125,890.21 

In President's Account 5'+-, 539-77 180,429.98 

1,213,019.4'!- 



19 



Haverford College 



FINANCIAL STATENBIT j 

i 
For The Year Ending 8th Month 3I, 19'^-3 { 

Net Cash Receipts at College 

As per foregoing statement $ 267,385.77 

Less: Tuition provided by Scholarships 

From Funds $12,96^.15 

From Donations. .. ^,238.00 17,202.13 $ 230,183.62 ■ 

Receipts of Completed Accelerated 1 

Summer Term 19^2, last year's report ^8,379 .33 ' 

298,362.93 

Income from Funds and Donations 
(Applicable to Operating Account 
after capitalizing and special 
purposes) 1 

Income from Funds 193,629.4-0 | 

Donations for Scholarships ^,238.00 j 

Other Donations and Refund for 

Salaries, etc 3,589.75 : 

From Student Loan Fiind - Return on 

a/c advances made 5 ,000.00 206,437.15 505,020.10 

Expenses of Running the College 

Regular running expenses as per : 

foregoing statement 398,635.85 j 

Add: - I 

Stork Art Gift - Interest on I 

overdraft not covered by income 1,244.00 ( 

Annuity 1,600.00 

Old Style Pensions to Retired Faculty.. 24,439.90 

Special Pensions to Retired Bnployees.. 8IO.6O 1 

Second one-sixth cost of Alterations ' 

to Language House, No. 2 

College Lane 3II.87 

Second one-sixth cost of Kitchen , 

and Dining Room Alterations 2,501.03 429,734.25 1 

Expenses of Completed Accelerated 
Summer Term, 1942 

1941-42 as per last year's report... 18,152.27 

1942-43 13,258.46 31,410.73 461,153-98 

Operating Gain for 1942-1943 ^ 43,866.12 , 



Note: The Accelerated Summer Term of 1943, and the Premeteorological 
Unit have not been completed in the fiscal year 194-2-1943, and 
will go over into 1943-1944-. 



20 



Haverford College 



STATEMENT OF DEBT OF THE CORPORATION 



8th Month 31, 19^3 



Debt of the Corporation 9th Month 1, 19^2 



$ lK0,5')l.l\l 



Decreased during the year: - 

By Old Bills Collected 117 -70 

By Donations for deficit on 

Library New Stack Addition $ 3,38iJ-.89 

By Operating Gain 19^2 -19'J-3 4-3,866.12 iJ-7,368.71 

Increased by Purchase and Alterations 

of 521 Panmure Road Property 13 ,253.70 

Debt 8th Month 31 , 19^3 

Incurred as follows: - 

Accumulated deficits 26,630.10 

Campus Dwellings 

(not covered by Donations) 

No. 1 College Circle l^l, 689-98 

No. 3 College Circle 9,616.17 

No. h College Circle 10,938.^6 

No. 5 College Circle 8,717.69 

791 College Avenue 

(Sharpless House) 14,^112.29 

787 College Avenue 

(Babbitt House) 8,203.4-1 66,578.00 

521 Panmure Road 13,253.70 

Library New Stack Addition 

( covered by pledge ) I5 .00 

$ 106,4-76.80 



34,115.01 

$ 106,476.80 



Note: - The Investment of the Funds in College Lane 

Real Estate and eight Dwellings remains the 

same, being $201,500. in Consolidated 
Investments Account. 



21 



Book Value 9/l/'4^g 



REPORT OF FUNDS 



Increased Decreased Book Value 8/31/'4-3 



Funds for General Purposes 

General Endowment Fuiid 9l^, 666.07 

John Fa mum Memorial Fund 38,219.55 

John M. Whitall Fund 10,351.93 

David Scull Fund '+3,593.11 

Edward L. Scull Fund 11,056.57 

Wistar Morris Meraorlnl Fund 5 , 004.92 

Israel Franklin Mhitill Fund 10,489.94 

Jacob P. Jones Endowment Fund 1,266,130.87 

John Farnum Brown Memorial Fund 268,427.71 

Ellen Wain Fund , 10 , 8l6 .02 

Clementine Cope Endowment Fund 20,911-57 

Nathan Branson Hill Fund 5,084.91 

Joseph E. Gllllngham Fund 41,246.56 

Henry Norris Fund 5 ,726.60 

Elizabeth H. Famum >'und 9,624.66 

James R. Magee Fund 42,973-91 

Albert K. Smiley Fund 1,459.37 

Hlnchman Astronomical Fund 38,445.30 

W. D. & E. M. L. Scuil Fund 169,832.77 

Albin Garrett Memorial Fund 26, 045.98 

Arnold Chase ScatterROod Fund 23,721.27 

Francis B. Gunmiere Mjmorial Fund 122,168.77 

Isaac Sharpless Memorial Fund 212,804.72 

General Education Fuiid 122,662.35 

Centenary Fund 233-31 

William Ponn Foundation 99,303-19 

Walter Carroll Brlnton Memorial Fund 13,743.23 

Corporation Fund 77,843.13 

Elizabeth J. Shortrldge Fund 9,729.18 

Howard Comfort Memorial Fund 4,891.15 

Emma Rldgway Comly Fund 48 , 633 .71 

Ellen W. Longstreth Fund 

In Consolidated a/o 98,579.53 

E. W. Longstreth Agency b/c 1,557.30 

Mary Pearsall Agency a/c 6,84l.59 

Albert L. Bally Fund 4,864.59 

Elizabeth B. Wistar Warner Fund 4,815.95 

T. Allen Hilles Bequest 273,160.51 

Leonard L. Greif, Jr. & Roger L, Greif Fund 972.92 

Edward M. Wistar Fund 2,432.30 

Morris E. Leeds Fund 39,812.16 

J . Henry Scattergood Fund 1 .655 .36 



Fund for Wistar Brown Graduate School 

Moses Brown Fund 

Funds for Morris Infirmary 

Infirmary Endowment Fund 

John W. Plnkham Fund 



9,392.00 
4,922.48 



12.50 



786.72 

20.74 

6.65 



,290,534.54 



912.21 

3,225.83 

99.75 

420.07 

106. 54 

48.23 

101.08 

12,200.62 

2,586.61 

104.22 

201.51 

397-^+6 
55-18 

4i4.io 

14.06 

370.46 

1,636.53 

250.98 

228.58 

1,177.23 

2,050.61 

1,181.99 

2.25 

956.90 

132-^+3 

750.11 

93.75 

^+7.13 

468.64 

972.50 

619.92 

46.88 

46.41 

2,632.21 

9.38 

23.44 

383-64 

15.95 



342,756.69 1,634.07 3,302. 



l4,3l4.48 



90.50 
47.43 



.753.86 
994.92 
,252-18 
173.04 
950.03 
956.69 
,388.86 
930.25 
841.10 
711.80 
710.06 
097.41 
849.10 
671-'+2 
624-66 
559-81 
445.31 
074-84 
196.24 
795 .00 
492.69 
991.5't- 
754.11 
480.36 
231.06 
98,346.29 
13,610.80 
77,093.02 
9,635.'+3 
4,844.02 
48,165.07 

98,393-75 
1,578.04 
6,228.32 
4,817.71 
4,769.5'*- 
270,528.30 
963 .5't- 
2,408.86 

39,428.52 
1.639-41 



93 

34 
10 

43 

10 

4 

10 

1,253 

2 65 

10 

20 

5 

4o 

5 

9 

42 

1 

38 
168 
25 
23 
120 
210 
121 



Balance 


Met 


Expended for 


9/1/42 


Income 


General Purposes 




4,513. l"*- 


3,638.14 




1,766.01 


1,766.01 




493.52 


493.52 




2,078.27 


2,078.27 




527.11 


527.11 




238.61 


238.61 




500.10 


500.10 




60,361.95 


53,624.45 




12,797.11 


12,797.11 




515-65 


515.65 




996.95 


996.95 




136. 4fa 


136.46 




1,966.40 


1,296.40 




273.01 


273.01 




313.91 


313-91 




2, 048-75 


2,048.75 




69.57 


69.57 




1,832.85 


1,832.85 


275-00 


8,096.66 


7,315.2'+ 




1,241.72 


1,241.72 




1,130.90 


1,130,90 




5,824.31 


5,824.31 




10,145.32 


10,145.32 




5,847.84 


5,847.84 




11.12 


11.12 




4,734.21 


4,734.21 




655.20 


655.20 




3,711.12 


3,711.12 




463.83 


463.83 




233.18 


233.18 




2,318.58 


2,318.58 



13,256,376.96 



341,087.90 



31.51 



9,301.50 

'+,875.05 



1*+, 176.55 



4,863.49 



231.92 

229.60 

13,022.75 

46.38 

115.96 

1,898.02 

78.92 



16,340.70 



447.76 
23'+. 68 



4, 563. 1+9 



231.92 

229.60 

13,022.75 

46.38 

115.96 

1,898.02 

17. '+1 



13,806.63 



447.76 
234.68 



Expended for 
Special Purposes 

875 .00 Scholarships 



6,737.50 Scholarships 



670.00 Scholarships 



216.42 Books 
340.00 Rent 



Balance 
8/31/43 



500.00 Reserved for Books 



300.00 Books 



30.00 Lecture 



800.00 Scholarships 
100.00 Appropriations 
1,634.07 Capitalized 



Fund for Haverford UnK 



Haverford Union Fund 1 82 T 94 

Funds for Scholarships 

Thomas P. Cope Fund 3 ^-^^ )^2 

Edward Yamall Fund !'.!!!!!!!! 5'904'86 

Isaiah V. Williamson Fund !'.!!!! 19'28o'69 

Richard T. Jones Scholarship Fund l4.'919'32 

Mary M. Johnson Scholarship Fund .'.'.'.'. 6 '823 67 

Sarah Marshall Scholiirship Fund 7'705!27 

^°"'^'^ $49,749.23 $3,649,433.65 |2,46l. 



17. 61 



49.29 
56.90 
185.79 
47.40 
b5.75 
7*^ .25 



5,066.13 
5.847.96 
19,094.90 
4,871.92 
fa, 757. 92 
7,631-02 



1,810.33 



87.15 



87.15 



$38,923.17 $49,269.85 $3,613,451.74 



196.65 


243.87 




410.00 Scholarships 


30.52 


200.24 


281.51 




125.00 Scholarships 


356.75 


470.65 


919.19 




1,076.65 Scholarships 


313.19 


103.09 


234.53 




175.00 Scholarships 


162.-62 


95.01 


325.31 




300.00 Scholarships 


120.32 


107.63 


367.3'+ 
$175,812.44 




300.00 Scholarships 
$14,089.64 


174,97 


$1,416.76 


$161,481-19 


$1,658.37 



22 



Book Value 9/l/it-2 



Forwa rd 

I Tunds for Scholarships (eontinuedj 

Clementine Cope Fellowship Fund 

Isaac Thorne Johnson Scholarship Fund 

Caspar Wistar Memorial Fund 

J. Kennedy Moorhouse Scholarship Fund 

Louis Jaquette Palmer Scholarship Fund 

Paul M. Newhall Memorial Scholarship Fund 

Robert Martin Zuckert Memorial Scholarship Fund. 

Samuel E. Hllles Scholarship Fund 

Class of 1913 Scholarship Fund 

Class of 1917 Scholarship Fund 

Augustus Taber Murray Research Scholarship Fund. 

Funds for the Library 

Alumni Library Fund 

Hary Farnum Brown Library Fund 

William H. Jenks Library Fund 

Hary Wistar Brown Williams Library Fund 

Anna Yams 11 Fund 

In Consolidated a/c 

Agency a/c 

F. B. Gummere Library Fund 

Edmund Morris Fergusson, Jr. Memorial Fund 

Class of 1888 Library Fund 

Class of 1918 Library Fund 

Funds for Old Style Pensions 

President Sharpless Fund 

wm. P. Henszey Fund 

Jacob P. Jones Benefit Fund 

Pliny Esrle Chase Memorial Fund 

Haverf ord College Pensi on Fund 

Funds for Special Purposes 

Thomas Shipley Fund 

Elliston P. Morris Fund 

John B. Oerrett Reading Prize Fund 

Special Endowment Fund 

Scholarship Improvement Prize Fund 

Elizabeth P. Smith Fund 

S. P. Llppincott History Prize Fund 

Francis Stokes Fund 

George Peirce Prize Fund 

Lyman Beecher Hall Prize Fund 

Newton Prize Fund 

Edward B. Conklin Athletic Fund 

Arboretum Fund 

William Ellis Scull Prize Fund 

Paul D. I. Maier Fund 

Strawbridge Observatory Maintenance Fund 

Jacob & Eugenie Buoky Memorial Foundation 

Mathematics Department Prize Fund 



$49, 7^+9. 23 $3,6lJ-9,'*-33.65 $2,l^6l. 



Decreas ed Book Value 8/31/'<-3 

$38,923.17 $'*-9,269.85 $3,613,'^■51.7'^ 



22,227.1'J- 
7,810.03 
2,871.28 
5 ,016.22 
4,86l+.59 
'+,908.95 

l't,957.79 
1^,881.1+3 
2,918.75 
1,998.87 



16,962.88 

64,657.53 

l+,864.59 

19,756.78 

166,621.08 

l,80l+.25 

618.26 

975.20 

5, 591+. 93 

1,219.58 



4-0,120.27 

35,763.15 

66,269.08 

3,183.61 

109,006.38 



5,105.88 
1,096.24 
2,210.70 
8,977.18 
2,234.67 
1,696.83 
2,477.90 
4,981.63 
2,069.66 
2,096.63 
1,359.89 
2,335.01 
4,463.50 
1,945.84 
972.92 
3,735.55 
2,012.67 




122,204.28 
21,360.00 



72.34 



378.58 
66.84 



386.81 



449.31 



283,075.08 



254,342.49 



48.67 



95.95 
909.14 



214.18 
75.26 
27.67 
46.34 
46.88 
47.30 

144.14 
47.04 
26.13 

20.10 
512.50 



1,609.58 

5.96 

9.4o 

53.91 

11.75 



386.60 

344.62 

638.58 

30.68 

1,050.40 



49.20 
10.56 
21.30 
86.51 
21.53 
16.35 
23.88 
48.00 
19.94 
20.20 
13.10 
22.50 
43.01 
18.75 

9.38 
36.00 
19.39 

1.85 



22,012.96 

7,807.11 
2,843.61 
4,967.88 
4,817.71 
4,861.65 
14,813.65 
4,834.39 
2,890.62 
2,357-35 



163.46 16,799.42 

623.05 64,421.29 

46.88 4,817.71 

190.38 19,566.40 



165,460.81 

1,804.25 

612. 30 

965.80 

5,541.02 

1,207.83 



39,733.67 

35,418.53 

65,630.50 

3,152.93 

107,955-98 



5,056.68 
1,085.68 
2, 189.40 
8,890.67 
2, 213.14 
1,680.48 
2,454.02 
4,933.63 
2,098.39 
2,076.43 
1,346.79 
2,312.51 
4,420.49 
1,927.09 

963.54 
3,699.55 
2,089.23 

907.29 



121,476.78 
20,914.34 



281,196.83 



251,891.61 



Balance 


Net 


Expended 


for 


Expended for 


9/1/42 


Income 


General 


. Pu: 


[•poses 


Special Purposes 


$1,416.76 


$175,812.44 


$161, 


,481 


.19 


$14,089.64 


1,380.08 


1,059.66 








900.00 Scholarships 

72.34 Capitalized 
300.00 Scholarships 
100.00 Scholarships 




372.34 








136.18 


136.89 








43.77 


239.14 








225.00 Scholarships 


49.52 


231.92 








225.00 Scholarships 


47.19 


234.03 








125.00 Scholarships 


300 .07 


713.10 








600.00 Scholarships 


65.02 


232.72 








175 .00 Scholarships 


42.87 


139.15 








95.00 Scholarships 


16.63 


99.45 








116.08 Capitalized 


- 483.20 


952.16 








980.00 Annuity 



48.25 
1,226.50 



6.14 

8.57 

55.63 

22.11 



769 


.76 


122 


.47 


145 


.87 


893 


.06 


73 


.67 


80 


.16 


72 


.28 


426 


.92 


188 


.66 


27. 


.24 


431.16 


58.73 



247.58 



49.772.70 



50.345.01 



$4,380,188.20 $4,869.52 $45,781.41 



$4,339,276.31 $7,919.65 



808.69 

3,082.50 

231.92 

941.89 

8,353.01 

29.48 

46.49 

266.73 

58.14 



1,912.71 
1,704.98 
3,159.33 
151.78 
5,196.81 



243.42 

52.26 

105.39 

427.98 

106.54 

80.90 

118.13 

237.50 

98.67 

99.96 

64.83 

111.32 

212.79 

95.77 

46.38 

178.09 

95.95 

9.14 

$208,549.48 



808.69 



6,463.45 



1,912.71 

1,704.98 

3,159.33 

151.78 

5,196.81 



2,695.69 Books 

386.81 Capitalize 
119.02 Books 
205.86 Books 

1,889.56 Books 

2.01 Books 

33.55 Books 

.42 Books 



215 .88 Lectures 
137.10 Books 

25 .00 Fr. Co. on Educ . 
200.00 Eel. Educ. Com. 
95 .00 Prizes 







16.06 


Books 






50.00 


Campus Club 
Capitalized 
Prizes 






105.00 
50.00 


Prizes 

Books 

Prize 


111 


.32 






26 


.38 


20.00 


Prizes 


76 


.30 










95.95 


Capitalized 






9.14 
$24,459.16 


Capitalized 


|;i8l,092 


.94 





Balance 
8/31/43 

$1,658.37 



1,539.74 

173.07 

57.91 

56,44 

156.22 

413.17 

122.74 

87.02 



511.04 



161.15 
1,962.53 



33.61 

21.51 

321.94 

80.25 



797.30 

37.63 

251.26 

1, 096.04 

85.21 

161.06 

174.35 

608.27 

188.62 
37.84 

643.95 
151.50 

349.37 



$10,917.03 



23 



Haverford College 





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Haverford College 



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25 



Haverford College 



ROY A. WRIGHT Be COMPANY 

CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS 

1530 CHESTNUT STREET 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



ROY A. WRIGHT, C. P. A. 



RITTENHOUSE 3827 



GEORGE W. MIHOK 
P.J. VAN BILLIARD 



October 15, 19^3 



Board of Managers 

The Corporation of Haverford College 

Haverford , Pennsylvania 

Dear Sirs: 

We have completed an examination of the acco\ints of 
your Treasurer, J. Henry Scattergood, for the fiscal year 
ended August 31, 19^3. 

The Cash Balances were verified by direct corre- 
spondence with your depository. The securities in the 
keeping of the Provident Trust Company of Philadelphia 
were examined by us, while those held by the Girard Trust 
Company and the First National Bank & Trust Company of 
Minneapolis, Minnesota, were certified to us by them, and 
found to be in accordance with the Treasurer's report. 

The Treasurer's report for the year was examined and 
compared with the books of account and found to agree 
herewith. 

The Comptroller's Accounts have been audited monthly 
during the year. 

In our opinion, the Treasurer's report sets forth 
the resxilt of operation of The Corporation of Haverford 
College for the fiscal year ended August 31, 19^3. 



Very truly yours. 




fifed Public Accountant 



26 



Haverford College 



DONATIONS FOR ADDITIONS TO FUNDS 



CLASS OF 1917 SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Through Dr. John W. Spaeth, Jr. 

From Lt. Henry W. Hill $ 3-00 

Dr. Donald Chandler 20 .00 

Edmund T. Price 75.00 

Loring Dam 80 .00 

William H. Chamberlin 5 .00 

Joseph W. Greene, Jr 10.00 

M. Alexander Laverty 10 .00 

Newlin F. Paxon 25 .00 

E. Roland Snader, Jr 20.00 

John W. Spaeth, Jr 12. 50 $ 2 62 .50 



MATHEMATICS DEPARTKENT PRIZE FUND (new) 

From Prof. Legh W. Reid 5OO.OO 

Prof. C. 0. Oakley 100.00 

Dr . Felix Morley 50 .00 

Christopher Morley 5O.OO 

Prof. C. B. Allendoerfer 200.00 900.00 

ELLEN W. LONGSTRETH FUND 



Further realization on legacy 4^9 .31 

ANNA YARNALL FUND 

Further realization on legacy 166. 80 | 1,778.61 



27 



Haverford College 



DONATIONS FOR CUERENT PURPOSES 

FOR PRIZES 

Class of 1902 for Latin Prize 

from A. C. Wood, Jr $ Ho.OO 

Class of 1910 Poetry Prizes 

from Harrison S. Hires 100 .00 $ llW.OO 

FOR LIBRARY 

Matzke Royalties 58.37 

Miscellaneous Library Gifts 76. 60 

Friend of the Library - Anonymous 75O.OO 88k. ')! 

FOR MUSIC AND ART 

Carnegie Corporation of New York 8,000.00 

Other Receipts 103.21 8,103.21 

FOR SCHOLARSHIPS 

New England Alumni through Weston Howland 3OO.OO 

Isaac Sharpless Scholarships from Alumni Association 5OO.OO 

Alvord Foundation 700.00 

Walter Hollander (return of Corporation Scholarship) I3O.OO 

Boyertown Public School 50 .00 

Anonymous - for 19^3-^ ^6 . 00 

S. Guggenheim Foundation 200.00 

American Friends Service Committee 600.00 

U. S. Bureau of Education 5OO.OO 

Anonymous 1 , 100 . 00 

Anonymous for Summer Term Scholarships 1 ,500 .00 

Anonymous for Special Scholarships 2 ,000 .00 

Edward Woolman 60.00 7,706.00 

FOR TRAVEL EXPENSE FIFTIETH CLASS REUNION 

Edward Woolman ^K) .00 

FOR CAMPUS CLUB 

Prof. & Mrs. C. B. Allendoerfer 2.00 

Howa rd A . Andrews 1 . 00 

Dr. & Mrs . James A. Babbitt 5 .00 

Wilfred Bancroft 5 .00 

T. Ellis Barnes 5. 00 

Mrs. Richard L. Barrows 1.00 

Mrs . Charles G. Berwind 20 .00 

Daniel B. Boyer 2 .00 

Samuel Thatcher Brinton 1.00 

Prof. & Mrs. William E. Cadbury, Jr 2.00 

Mr. & Mrs. Francis F. Campbell 2 .00 

Forward it-6.00 16,87^-18 



28 



Haverford College 

Forward $ 4-6.00 $ I6,87li-.l8 

FOR CAMPUS CLUB (continued) 

Mrs . Julia Cope Collins 2 .30 

Aubrey C . Dickson , Jr 2 .00 

H. A. Domincovich 1.00 

Henry S. Drinker, Jr 5 .00 

Mrs. Sydney B. Dunn 20.00 

Charles Evans 5 .00 

Edward W. Evans 2.00 

William T. Ferris 3 .00 

Prof. & Mrs. H. V. Gummere 2.00 

Gladys B. Gummere (Mrs. John F.) 1.00 

John F. Gummere 1.00 

Ri cha rd M . Gummere 1.00 

Prof. & Mrs. A. W. Haddleton 2.00 

Prof. & Mrs. Theodore B. Hetzel 3 .00 

Prof. & Mrs. Clayton W. Holmes 1.00 

Lewis Jones 3.00 

Prof. & Mrs. Rufus M. Jones 3 .00 

Wilmot R. Jones 2.00 

Prof. John A. Kelly 3 .00 

Mrs. Rayner W. Kelsey 2.00 

C. P. Knight, Jr 1.00 

Morris E. Leeds 23. 00 

M. A. Linton 3 .00 

M. A. Linton, Jr 2.00 

John C . Lober 3 .00 

George B . Mathues 1 .00 

Prof. & Mrs. W. B. Meldrum 2 .00 

Robert E . Miller 2 .00 

Walter L. Moore 1.00 

President & Mrs. Felix Morley 3. 00 

C. C. Morris 10.00 

Marriott C. Morris 3. 00 

Prof. & Mrs. Frederic Palmer 2 .00 

Dr. Thomas Parke 2 .00 

Prof. & Mrs. Harry W. Pfund 2,00 

Mr. & Mrs. G. R. Rebmann 10.00 

Charles S. Ristine 2.00 

Prof. & Mrs. L. H. Rittenhouse 2.00 

Miss Lilian A. Ross 1.00 

Prof. & Mrs. Ralph M. Sargent 3. 00 

A. G. Scattergood 3 .00 

J. Henry Scattergood 3 .00 

Dr. F. C. Sharpless 3 .00 

A. K. Smiley 3 .00 

Mr, & Mrs. Albert K. Smiley, Jr 2.00 

Mrs. A. K. Smiley (Mabel C.) 3.00 

Daniel Smiley, Jr 10.00 

Jonathan M. Steere 10,00 

Abram G. Tatnall 2 .00 

Mr. & Mrs. Francis R. Taylor 2.00 

Hubert R. Taylor 1.00 

Mrs. E. 0. Warner 1.00 

Mrs. Henry S. Williams 2.00 

Alexander J. Williamson 2,00 

Mr, & Mrs. W. M. Wills 2 .00 



Forward 267 .30 16,87^1.18 



29 



Haverford College 



Forward $ 267 .50 $ l6,87iJ-.l8 

FOR CAMPUS CLUB (continued) 

Prof. & Mrs. A. H. Wilson 5 .00 

Thomas Wistar 1.00 

William F. Wolff 1.00 

Mr. & Mrs. Edward Woolman 10.00 

Gif f ord K. Wright 5 .00 

Sale of Trees 197.OO k8G .50 

FOR CABE OF COPE FIELD 

Through Alfred G. Scattergood lj-3 .00 

FOR ROBERTS HALL ELECTRICAL IMPROVEMENTS 

Cap &■ Bells Society 236.^3 

FOR ENGINEERING EQUIPMENT 

William A. Battey I5O.OO 

FOR FIELD HOUSE FUND 

(Temporarily invested in U. S. Bonds) 

Student Association 7ij-,00 

Dr. Felix Morley 50 .00 

Max Elman 1 .00 

C. E. Hires, Jr 2^.00 

Seth T. Shepard 3 .00 

Dr. James A. Babbitt 5O.OO 

S. J. Gummere 10.00 

R. J. Johnston 10.00 

William J. Barnes & Family 5O.OO 

Dr. H. K. Ensworth 3. 00 

Haverford New England Society 76. 00 

Class of 19^13 107.37 

A. W. Haddleton 2 .25 

Jared S. Brown 2.30 

John A. Kelly 10.00 

Class of 190i|- 

P. D. Folwell 7ij-.00 

W. M. Wills 74.00 

Bernard Lester 7^.00 

C . C . Morris 100.00 322 .00 

Frank W. Fetter 1 .30 

Rev. George B. Edgar I.30 

Bruce Harley 3 .00 

Roy S. Vogt 30.00 

Class of 19^^+ 

Through S. E. Stokes, Jr., Treasurer 74.00 932.12 

Forward ; 18,724.23 



30 



Haverford College 



Forward $ 18,72^.25 

FOR GUMMERE-MORLEY ROOM IN rffiW LIBRAHY 

Class of 1892 from W. Nelson L. West 228.9^ 

FOR MAINTENANCE GOVERNTgJJT ^ LANaUAaE HOUSES 

Robert C . Atmore 5 .00 

G. Cheston Carey 100.00 

Gifford K. Wright 10.00 II5 .00 

FOR INAUGURATION OF GOVERNMENT HOUSE 

National Foundation for Education 33O.OO 

FOR LECTURE 

Anonymous 100 .00 

FOR SALARIES 

Prof. D. V. Steere 3OO.OO 

Alumni Association 768.23 1,068.23 

FOR SUMMER TERM SALARY 

Anonymous 260 .00 

FOR HAVERFORD REVIEW 

Alumni Association I7I.3O 

FOR EDUCATIONAL MISCELLANEOUS 

National Foundation for Education 50.00 

FOR PRIZE ESSAY 

National Foundation for Education 100.00 

FOR PRE->^TEOROLOGY AWARD 

Anonymous 23 .00 

FOR PURPOSE NOT YET DESIGNATED 

Class of 193^ (Invested temporarily in U . S. Bonds) Mt-B.^l 

Morris E. Leeds 2 ,000.00 2 ,448.^1 

Forward 23,6i<-1.33 



31 



Haverford College 



Forward .• $ 23,6^1.35 

SPECIAL GIFT FOR GENERAL PURPOSES 

From an old friend of the College 200 .00 

FOR RECONSTRUCTION AND RELIEF 

Henry Janssen Foimdation I5O.OO 

Wyomissing Foundation, 1 j . 00 3OO.OO 

FOR RADIO CLUB 

Interest Added 61 . 60 

FOR DEFICIT ON COLLECTION SPEAKERS 

From Educational Miscellaneous Account "^^ .23 

FOR LIBRARY NEW STACK ADDITION 

Class of 1912 throuph Herbert M. Lowry 

A. L. Bailey 23.00 

E. G. Brinton 10.00 

J. A. Cope 20.00 

J . B . Elf reth 10 .00 

D. P. Falconer I5.OO 

L. W. Ferris 5 .00 

Hans Froelicher 5 .00 

R. A. Garner 10.00 

W. F. Graham 15 .00 

J. B. Hill 3.00 

H. M. Lowry 7. 00 

R. E. Miller 10.00 

S . S . Morri s 10 .00 

B.C. Murray 3 .00 

I. C. Poley 23.00 

L. C. Ritts 23.00 

W. H. Roberts, Jr 10.00 

T. E. Shipley 10.00 

L. M. Smith 10.00 

S. B. Sturgis 23.00 

H. M. Thomas 20.00 

Edward Wallerstein I3 .00 

C. H. Wetzel 10.00 

Additional Gift from General Fund 23. 00 323-00 

■ Class of 1927 through John C. Lobar 

Addison Allen 3 .00 

Samuel Armst rong 12.6^ 

M. Ward Bayles 3. 00 

Tech. Sgt. Harold E. Bates 10.00 

Charles A. Clement 3. 00 

Rabbi Samuel Cook 8.00 

Daniel Coxe 26.00 



Forvrard 69.6^1 323 .00 24-, 236. 18 



32 



Haverford College 



Forward $ 69.64 $ 325.00 $ 24,236.18 

FOR LIBRARY NEW STACK ADDITION (continued) 
Class of 1927 

Natt M. Emery, Jr 10.00 

Allan B . Fay 6 .00 

Albert V. Fowler 1.00 

John C . Heller 5 .50 

Stewart Hoskins 10 .00 

John C. Lober 24.00 

Lt . Paul W. Ohl 5 .00 

Chester dinger 25 .00 

Allen G. Powell 8.00 

Watson Scarborough 10.00 

Arthur Silver 20.00 

W. Foster Webster 25.00 219. l4 

Class of 1935 through John B. Rhoads, 250.00 

Walter C. Janney 2,500.00 

Dr. Felix Morley l4.45 

Dr. Leopold Szerlip 100.00 3,4o8.59 

TRIANGLE SOCIETY GIFT ' ^ 

Realized from stock donated 11 ,025 .23 

Dividends on stock donated 63O.OO 11,655.23 

SPECIAL DONATION FOR SALARY 

James P. Magill 100.00 

$ 39,4-00.00 



33 



Haverford College 



REPORT OF 

IIAVERFORD COLLECxE LOAII FUtJD 

Established 1926 
Report No. 17 August 3I , 19^3. 

Current Year 19^2 -ij-j 

Cash Balance on hand, August 3I , 19^2 $ 7,3^12.80 

16 Loans repaid during year 2,699.01 

22 part payments on loans during year 1,738.68 

Interest received during year 620.55 

5^ Dividend received from Me r ion Title & Trust Company ^12 .06 

Balance in Merion Title & Trust Company 63O.88 

$ 13,073.98 

25 loans made during year $ ^1, 160. 00 

2 Repayments to Corporation 5,000.00 

Funds in Merion Title & Trust Company 63O.88 9,790.88 

Cash balance on hand August 3I, 19^3 3,283.10 

87 loans outstanding August 3I , l')k'} 22 ,888.65 

Interest outstanding August 3I , 19^1-3 5 7 9 . 85 

Total resources, August 3I, 19^3 $ 26,751.60 

Total to August 31, 19^3 

Appropriations from Jacob P . Jones Endowment Fund 20 , 812 .Ok 

1st Donation from Class of 191I 64l.30 

2nd Donation from Class of 191I 137-90 

3rd Donation from Class of 1911 28.85 

Donation from Class of 1929 350.27 

Donation from A. R. Katz 5OO.OO 

Donation from Class of 1927 900.00 

Donation from Class of I908 1,507.96 

Gift from C. C. Morris - 5O.OO 

Gift from John Charles 3OO .00 

Gift, Anonymous 500.00 

Gift, Anonymous. . ., 2 ,000.00 

Gift, Haverford Society of Maryland 100.00 

Gift, Dr. H. S. Arthur 300.00 

271 loans repaid 37 ,891 .83 

351 part payments on loans 13,330.27 

Interest paid up 11,38^-02 

Payments from Merion Title and Trust Co. - 2/28/33 ■^ 'J-2 .06 

1/V38 811.12 

12/31/i^O... ^2.06 

7/22/i^3.... 1^2.06 210.30 

Total receipts $ ')0,')kH-.qk 



Repayments to Corporation $ 11,000.00 

Repayments of Donations 1 ,708.05 

Original funds in Merion Title and Trust Co 8^1.18 

Check Tax 1.66 

Loans made 7'^■,110■75 87,661.6'! 

Cash balance August 31, 19^+3 3,283-10 

Outstanding interest to August 3I , 19^+3 579-85 

Outstanding loans to August 3I , ^^^p 22 ,888-65 

Total resources, August 31, 19'i3 $ 26,751-60 



34 



ENDOWMENT FUNDS 



FUNDS FOR GENERAL PURPOSES 



GENERAL ENDOWMENT FUND 

Founded in 1847 with subscriptions of $50,000 by a number of Friends. Addi- 
tions were made as follows: 1868, from an anonymous source, $5,000; 1869, 
bequest of Ann Haines to increase the compensation of professors, $2,670; 1870, 
bequest of Richard D. Wood, $18,682.96; 1872, from William Evans, $1,000; 
1874, from executors of Jesse George, deceased, $5,000; 1880, bequest of Dr. 
Joseph W. Taylor. $5,000; 1901. legacy of Ann Williams. $2,425.50; 1041, 
from children of .Aubrey C. Dickson in his memory. $,^00. FVescnt hook value, 
$93,753.86. The income is used for salaries and schoIarshii)s. 

JOHN FARNUM MEMORIAL FUND 

Founded in 1878 by the heirs of John Farnum by gift of $25,000 as a memorial 
to him. Added to in 1899 by legacy of $10,000 from Elizabeth H. Farnum, widow 
of John Farnum. Present book value, $34,994.92. The income only is to be used 
to endow a "professorship of some practical science or literature." The chair of 
chemistry was designated as the "John Farnum Professor of Chemistry." The 
principal is held in the name of three Trustees for the benefit of The Corporation 
of Haverford College. 

JOHN M. WHITALL FUND 

Founded in 1880 by bequest of $10,000 from John M. Whitall, Sr. Present 
book value, $10,252. 18. The bequest is upon the condition that the art of drawing, 
especially mechanical drawing, shall be taught, and the income only is to be used, 
and for this purpose. 

DAVID SCULL FUND 

Founded in 1885 by bequest of $40,000 from David Scull, Sr. Present book 
value, $43, 173. 04. The income only is to be used to endow a professorship. The 
chair of biology was designated as the "David Scull Professor of Biology." 

' EDWARD L. SCULL FUND 

Founded in 1865 by net bequest of $9,500 from Edward L. Scull, '64. The legacy 
was added to the General Endowment Fund, but in 1888 it was set apart as a 
separate fund. Present book value, $10,950.03. The income only is to be used. 
The bequest is free from any legally bmding conditions, but it was the testator's 
desire "that some judicious means shall be employed by the Managers to further 
advise students on the subjects of diet and reading." 

WISTAR MORRIS MEMORLAL FUND 

Founded in 1892 by gift of $5,000 in bonds by Mary Morris, widow of Wistar 
Morris, as a memorial to him. Present book value, $4,956.69. There are no 
restrictions. The income is used for general college purposes. 

ISRAEL FRANKLIN WHITALL FUND 

Founded in 1896 by net legacy of $9,667.83 from Israel Franklin Whitall. Pres- 
ent book value, $10,388.86. The income only is to be used for the payment of 
professors or teachers. 



35 



Haverford College 

JACOB P. JONES ENDOWMENT FUND 

Founded in 1897 by residuary legacy of Jacob P. Jones. This amounted when 
received to par value of $279,021.60; book value, $332,301.60, and sundry real 
estate. The real estate has all been sold, netting $847,709.92. Present book 
value, $1 ,253/).^0.25. The income only is to be used for general college purposes, 
and out of said income there shall be admitted a portion at least of the students 
either free of charge or at reduced rates. In accordance with this provision, about 
$7,500 per annum is used for scholarships, and the balance of income for general 
college purposes. Jacob P. Jones' will contains the following: "My hope is that 
under the blessing and favor of God there will come from this source a revenue 
which shall be productive of growth and vigor in the institution as well as help 
at this critical period of their lives to many deserving young men of slender 
patrimony." 

JOHN FARNUM BROWN FUND FOR THE STUDY OF THE 

BIBLE, BIBLICAL HISTORY AND LITERATURE, 

PHILOSOPHY, AND KINDRED SUBJECTS 

Founded in 1900 by the late T. Wistar Brown as a memorial to his son, John 
Farnum Brown, '93. The original gift was in cash and securities of a par value of 
$43,000, shortly afterwards increased by further gifts of $15,000. The founder 
made further gifts of cash and securities until 1915, the total being $19,381 cash 
and $48,500 par of securities with book value of $41,490. His total gifts therefore 
had a book value of $234,970.81. Of this, $5,000 donated in 1910 is for endowment 
of prizes in Biblical History and in Philosophy. A portion of the income was 
capitalized each year to keep intact the full value of the fund until 1940 when 
this fund was included in the Consolidation of funds. Present book value, 
$265,841.10. The income only is to be used for the purpose of making provision 
for the regular study of the Bible and Biblical History and Literature, and as 
way opens for religious teaching. In 1910, the scope and title of the Fund were 
enlarged to include "and Philosophy and Kindred Subjects." Income up to $200 
may be used for prizes in Biblical Literature and Philosophy. 

ELLEN WALN FUND 

Founded in 1900 by legacy of $10,000 from Ellen Wain. Present book value, 
$10,711.80. There are no restrictions. The income is used for general college 
purposes. 

CLEMENTINE COPE ENDOWMENT FUND 

Founded in 1904 by bequest of $25,000 from Clementine Cope. Present book 
value, $20,7 10.06. There are no restrictions. The income is used for general college 
purposes. 

NATHAN BRANSON HILL TRUST 

Founded in 1904 by deposit with First National Bank and Trust Co., Min- 
neapolis, Minn., trustee, of a paid-up life insurance policy for $5,000 by Samuel 
Hill, '78, being in memory of his father, Nathan Branson Hill. The income is to 
be used to aid the maintenance of Haverford College so long as it shall remain 
under the auspices of the Society of Friends. In 1931, Samuel Hill died and the 
policy realized $5,039. Present book value, $5,097.41. 

JOSEPH E. GILLINGHAM FUND 

Founded in 1907 by bequest of $50,000 from Joseph E. Gillingham. Present 
book value, $40,849.10. The testator said, "I request, but I do not direct, that 
part of the income of this legacy may be used for free scholarships for meritorious 
students." In accordance with this request, $800 is appropriated annually from 
the income for scholarships, the balance being used for general college purposes. 



36 



Haverford College 

HENRY NORRIS FUND 

Founded in 1907 by bequest of $5,000 from Henry Norris. Present book value, 
$5,671.42. There are no restrictions. The income is used for general college 
purposes. 

ELIZABETH H. FARNUM FUND 

Founded in 1891. The original principal of this fund, amounting to $10,000, 
is held by the Provident Trust Co. of Philadelphia under a deed of trust created 
by Elizabeth H. Farnum. The first income accrued to the College in 1914. Present 
book value, S9.624.66. There are no restrictions to the use of the income, and same 
is applied to general college purposes. 

JAMES R. MAGEE FUND 

Founded in 1915 by bequest of $10,000 from James R. Magee, '59, and added 
to in 1925, 1926, 1928, 1929, 1930, 1931, 1932, 1936, 1937, and 1940 by additional 
payments of $29,182.84, $1,694.84, $499.31, $499.68. $488.85. $207.33, $400, 
$250 and $100 under his legacy. Present book value, $42,559.81. There are no 
restrictions except that the income only is to be used. This is applied to general 
college purposes. 

ALBERT K. SMILEY FUND 

Founded in 1915 by gift of $1,000 from Daniel Smiley, '78, as a memorial to 
his brother, Albert K. Smiley, '49, and added to in 1924 and 1926. Present book 
value, $1,445.31. There are no restrictions except that preference was expressed 
that the income only should be used. This is applied to general college purposes. 

THE HINCHMAN ASTRONOMICAL FUND 

Founded in 1917 by bequest of $10,000 par value securities from Charles S. 
Hinchman. Increased in 1928, 1929, 1930, 1931, 1932, 1933, 1934, 1935, and 1936 
by donations of $28,926.95 from a friend of the College. Present book value, 
$38,074.84. The income only to be used "to increase the salary of the astronomical 
professorship so as to provide a suitable instructor in the ennobling study of the 
heavens." 

WALTER D. AND EDITH M. L. SCULL FUND 

Founded in 1918 by bequest of Walter D. Scull, whose death followed shortly 
after the death of his sister, Edith M. L. Scull. Each left his or her estate to the 
other, unless predeceased; in this latter case both American estates were left to 
Haverford College. Both were children of Gideon D. Scull, '43, and resided in 
England. Income accumulated before the receipt of the fund by the College 
amounted to $16,887.66, of which $15,078.51 was added to the principal of the 
fund. Present book value, $168,196.24. The fund was created to establish a pro- 
fessorship of modern English constitutional history, and the chair has been 
designated as the Walter D. and Edith M.T. Scull Professorship of History. 

ALBIN GARRETT MEMORIAL FUND 

Founded in 1919 by legacy of $25,000 from Mary Hickman Garrett, in memory 
of her late husband, Albin Garret, '64. Present book value, $25,795.00. There are 
no restrictions. The income is used for general college purposes. 

ARNOLD CHASE SCATTERGOOD MEMORIAL FUND 

Founded in 1919 by gift of $30,000 in securities from Maria Chase Scattergood 
in memory of her son, Arnold Chase Scattergood, of the Class of 1919, who died 
in his Junior year. Present book value, $23,492.69. The income only is to be used 
toward the payment of professors' salaries. Should Haverford at any time in the 



37 



Haverford College 

future give instruction or offer courses in Military Training, the fund must be 
surrendered to Committee on Education of Yearly Meeting of Friends of Phila- 
delphia. 

FRANCIS B. GUMMERE MEMORIAL FUND 

Founded in 1920. This fund was started by a gift of $25,000 from the late Miss 
Emily H. Bourne, of New York, conditional upon the raising of $100,000 addi- 
tional for an endowment of the Chair of English Literature in memory of her 
friend. Professor Francis Barton Gummere. A committee of alumni, consisting of 
J. Stogdell Stokes, '89, chairman; E. R. Tatnall, '07, treasurer; Hans Froelicher, 
'12, secretary; Charles J. Rhoads, '93; Alfred M. Collins, '97; Winthrop Sargent, 
Jr., '08, and Parker S. Williams, '94, working with President Comfort, organized 
a comprehensive campaign among the alumni and friends of the College to raise 
$375,000 for this purpose and for increase of professors' salaries; the first $100,000 
of unspecified gifts was used to complete the Francis B. Gummere Memorial 
Fund to at least $125,000, and the balance comprised the Isaac Sharpless Memo- 
rial Fund. Total, book value, $120,991.54. 

ISAAC SHARPLESS MEMORIAL FUND 

Founded in 1920. The alumni of the College conducted during 1920 a campaign 
for $375,000 additional endowment for the College to make possible additional 
salaries to the professors. Appeal was made to found two new funds, the Francis B. 
Gummere Memorial Fund and the Isaac Sharpless Memorial Fund. The funds 
received, except where otherwise specified, were first applied to the completion 
of the former up to $125,000 (see above). Specified gifts and donations thereafter 
received were then applied to the Isaac Sharpless Memorial Fund. The income 
only is to be used for salaries of professors. Total book value, $210,754.11. 

GENERAL EDUCATION BOARD FUND 

The General Education Board of New York appropriated $125,000 in 1920 to 
the campaign for increase of endowment when the Francis B. Gummere Memorial 
Fund and the Isaac Sharpless Memorial Fund, totaling $375,000, were raised. In- 
terest at five per cent was paid on the full sum for three years, and the $125,000 
in full payment was completed in 1926-1927. Total book value, $121,480.36. 



HAVERFORD IMPROVEMENT FUND 

Founded in 1922 to hold the Corporation's undivided share in College Lane land 
and eight houses. This property was turned over to the Corporation free of debt 
on Third Month 17, 1922, and with same the then debt of the Corporation amount- 
ing to $155,942.15 was liquidated. The fund started with an undivided interest of 
$19,000. There was added in 1922, $9,000; and in 1925, $2,000. In 1926, $5,000 of 
this fund was sold and the proceeds were appropriated for the alterations to 
Roberts Hall. The balance of this fund, $25,000, was also used in 1927 for the 
same purpose. The income was used for general college purposes. It is hoped 
that this fund may be refunded from the Centenary Campaign, a part of which 
was planned to cover the Roberts Hall alterations. 

The College Lane land was purchased in 1886 for the benefit of the College by 
David Scull, Justus C. Strawbridge, Richard Wood and Francis Stokes, Managers 
of the College and now all deceased. With contributions raised by them and by 
mortgages on which they went on the bonds, funds were raised to build six dwelling 
houses, and two houses were built by the Corporation itself. From the income of 
the houses the debt against the properties was gradually reduced until it was 
entirely liquidated in 1919. The net income from 1919 until 1922, when the 
property was turned over to the Corporation, was applied toward the reduction 
of the Corporation's debt. 



38 



Haverford College 

CENTENARY FUND 

Centenary Fund (1) was founded in 1926 by gifts to the College in anticipation 
of the one hundredth anniversay of its founding in 1833. There were no restric- 
tions and the income was used for general college purposes until 1935, when the 
principal was used in the liquidation of debt. 

In 1935 a further campaign among the Alumni was conducted under the direc- 
tion of William M. Wills, '04, to add to the funds raised in commemoration of the 
Centenary. This was designated as Centenary Fund (2), but in 1935-1936 the 
payment of pledges to (1) were merged with (2) at the request of donors, and the 
two accounts are now considered as one. 

During 1936-1937, $9,000 additional donations were made by members of the 
Strawbriilge family, and of these $3,372.63 were transferred for the final cost of 
the William J. Strawbridge '94 Memorial Astronomical Observatory, and $5,627,37 
were set aside to establish the Strawbridge Observatory Maintenance Fund. Other 
additional gifts of $16,017.04 were made in 1936-1937, '$7, 700 in 1937-1938, $2,150 
in 1938-1939, and $15 in 1939-1940 bringing the totals contributed to both funds 
to date, for the Observatory $47,000, and for other uses $145,947.55. 

From the $16,017.04, together with $1,550 realized from a previous gift of an 
investment, the balance of the debt for pension contributions $12,022.57 was met, 
$5,544.47 was applied to the debt for accrued deficits, $7,700 was applied to the 
operating vear 1937-193K. and $_M50 to that of 1938-1939, $15.00 to that of 
1939-1940. and $11.34 for 1940-1941. 

There remains one investment in this fund not yet realized upon with a book 
value of $231.06. 

WILLIAM PENN FOUNDATION 

Started in 1926 toward a fund of $120,000 to establish a chair or lectureship in 
Political Science and International Relations. This fund forms a part of the Cen- 
tenary program to raise $1,000,000. This foundation is to be devoted, at the dis- 
cretion of the Managers, to providing adequate undergraduate instruction in the 
theory and practice of our own and other governments, in the history of past 
attempts to secure international agreements and in the methods by which good 
international understanding may be promoted and maintained. Book value to 
date, $98,346.29. 

WALTER CARROLL BRINTON MEMORLAL FUND 

Founded in 1920 by gift of $5,000 by the family of Walter Carroll Brinton, 
Class of 1915, who died in France Twelfth Month 8, 1918, while engaged in 
Friends' Reconstruction Work. The fund sustained the Walter Carroll Brinton 
Scholarship until 1926-1927. It was then increased $6,000 by further gifts of the 
founders, and at their request the purpose was changed from a scholarship fund 
to form a separately named fund of the William Penn Foundation, with its income 
to be used for the same objects. Present book value, $13,610.80. 

CORPORATION FUND 

Founded in 1928 by setting aside $70,000 of proceeds from sale of 5.811 acres 
of land on the southern boundary and at the southeastern corner of the College 
farm. In 1937, the fund was increased $8,810, being proceeds of the sale of 1.762 
acreas of land to the Philadelphia Skating Club and Humane Society for their new 
ice skating rink. Present book value, $77,093.02. The fund is invested and the 
income used for general college purposes, until otherwise directed by the Managers. 

ELIZABETH J. SHORTRIDGE FUND 

Founded in 1930 by bequest from Elizabeth J. Shortridge, without restrictions. 
The fund is invested, and until otherwise directed by the Managers, the income 
only is used for general purposes. Present book value, $9,635.43. 



39 



Haverford College 

HOWARD COMFORT MEMORIAL FUND 

Founded in 1934 and added to in 1935, 1936, and 1937 by donations totaling 
$5,000 from President William Wistar Comfort in memory of his father, Howard 
Comfort, Class of 1870, who was a Manager from 1880 until his death in 1912, 
and Secretary of the Board of Managers from 1884 until 1908. The income only 
is to be used, and for general purposes. Present book value, $4,844.02. 

EMMA RIDGWAY COMLY FUND 

Founded 1935 by bequest of $50,000 from Emma Ridgway Comly, a Philadel- 
phia Friend. The bequest was unrestricted as to both principal and income. The 
income is used for general purposes. Present book value, $48,165.07. 

ELLEN W. LONGSTRETH FUND 

Founded 1935 by bequest of $20,000 and her residuary estate from Ellen W. 
Longstreth, a Friend belonging to Haverford Meeting, and living in Bryn Mawr. 
The principal and income are both unrestricted. The bequest of $20,000 and $84,- 
416.28 in 1935-1936, $3,338.69 in 1936-1937, and $73.33 in 1938 from the residu- 
ary estate have been received, making $107,828.30 in all. There are some parcels 
of real estate not yet liquidated, which will somewhat increase this fund. The 
income is used for general purposes. Present book value, $106,200.11. 

ALBERT L. BAILY FUND 

Founded in 1936 by an unrestricted bequest of $5,000 from Albert L. Daily, 
'78. The income is used for general purposes. Present book value, $4, 817. 71. 

ELIZABETH B. WISTAR WARNER FUND 

Founded First Month 16, 1937, by unrestricted bequest of $4,950 from Elizabeth 
B. Wistar Warner, of Germantown, widow of George M. Warner, '73. The income 
is used for general purposes. Present book value, $4,769.54. 

T. ALLEN HILLES BEQUEST 

Founded First Month 19, 1937, by receipt of the proceeds of a trust fund created 
in 1935 by T. Allen Hilles, class of-1870, formerly of Wilmington, Delaware, re- 
cently of Glen Mills, Pa., who died 11th Month 15, 1935. The amount received 
in stocks and cash was $285,000. Proceeds of mortgages of $7,460.94 in 1938, and 
final cash from executor in 1939 of $1,603.37 brought the gross total to $294,064.31. 
From this was deducted in 1939 the final settlement of taxes and fees totalling 
$13,300, thus making the final net bequest $280,764.31. Accumulated income of 
$12,489.77 was also received on First Month 19, 1937. In the trust created by the 
donor in 1935 he provided: "The gift to Haverford College shall constitute a fund 
to be known as The Hilles Bequest,' and the income shall be used for repair, up- 
keep and improvement of the building which I have given to Haverford College 
known as the Hilles Laboratory of Applied Science of Haverford College. My 
purpose in making this gift is primarily to relieve the Corporation of Haverford 
College from any additional expense on account of the erection of the building 
which I have given them, and the accompanying expansion of its educational 
activities, but whenever and if the Board of Managers or other governing body 
of the College shall determine it to be for the best interest of the College to devote 
the whole or any part of the income of the fund to uses other than those above 
specified, such income may be applied to such uses and in such manner as the 
Board of Managers or other governing body may in its absolute discretion deter- 
mine." Present book value, $270,528.30. 

LEONARD L. GREIF, JR., AND ROGER L. GREIF FUND 

Founded Ninth Month 29, 1937, by gift of $1,000 from Leonard L. Gi'eif, '34, 
and Roger L. Greif, '37, of Baltimore. The gift was unrestricted, but the Managers 
have set aside this fund as endowment for general purposes, the income only to 
be used, until otherwise determined by them. Present book value, $963.54. 

40 



Haverford College 

EDWARD M. WISTAR FUND 

Founded First Month 9, 1938, by gift of $2,500 from Edward M. Wistar. 72. 
for endowment, the income only to be used for general purposes. Present book 
value, $2,408.86. 

MORRIS E. LEEDS FUND 

Founded Sixth Month 26, 1941, by gift of 400 Participating Shares of Leeds 
and Northrup Stock Trust. The fund is unrestricted as to principal and 
interest, but was ordered by the Managers, until otherwise directed, to be 
included among the funds for General Purooses. the income only to be used. 
Present book value. $39,428.52. This fund is subject to an annuity of $1600, 
during the life of its donor. 

J. HENRY SCATTERGOOD FUND 

Founded Tenth Month, 1941, by donations totalling $1,660, made by members 
of the Board of Managers in recognition of the services for 25 years of J. Henry 
Scattergood, '96, as Treasurer of the Corporation of Haverford College. 

The income of this fund is to be used in the field of International Relations 
and to be at the disposal of the President of the College and the William Penn 
Professor holding the Chair in Political Science and International Relations. 
If the income in any year is not used for the special purposes as stated, in the 
discretion of the President, it may be used for general purposes. It is further 
provided that after Tenth Month 1, 1951 the use of the fund for other purposes, 
both as to principal and income, shall be subject to the direction of the Board of 
Managers of Haverford College. Present book value, $1,639.41. 

FUND FOR GRADUATE SCHOOL 

MOSES BROWN FUND 

A trust founded by T. Wistar Brown, in 1906, as a memorial to his father, 
Moses Brown. Transferred to the College in 1916 after his death, having at that 
time a par value of $372,821.91 and book value of $318,823.56. Present book 
value, $341,087.90. The fund was created to establish a graduate course in religious 
study in harmony with and supplementary to the teaching and study provided 
for by the John Farnum Brown Fund. The income only is to be used; at least 
ten per cent of the total income must be capitalized each year. The unused income, 
if any, is likewise capitalized at the close of each fiscal year. The graduate school 
supported by the Moses Brown Fund was designated "The Thomas Wistar Brown 
Graduate School." In 1927 the former separate school was discontinued and eight 
graduate scholarships were created. 

In 1937-1938, arrangements were first made for cooperation in courses with 
Pendel Hill, a school for religious education under the care of Friends, located at 
Wallingford, Pa. 

FUNDS FOR INFIRMARY 

INFIRMARY ENDOWMENT FUND 

Founded in 1911 from subscriptions totaling $9,072.55, raised among alumni 
and friends of the College. Present book value, $9, 301. 50. The income is used 
toward the expenses of the Morris Infirmary. 

JOHN W. PINKHAM FUND 

Founded in 1911 by legacy of $5,000 from Dr. John W. Pinkham, '60, being 
transmitted by gift from his widow, Cornelia F. Pinkham. Present book value, 
$4,875.05. There are no binding conditions, but as she expressed an interest in the 
Morris Infirmary, then building, the Board of Managers directed that the income 
of this fund should be used in the support and maintenance of the Infirmary. 



41 



Haverford College 

FUND FOR HAVERP'ORD UNION 

HAVERFORD UNION FUND 

Founded in 1920 by gift of $1,000 par value of bond at book value of $800 and 
$678.59 cash, and all the personal property in the Union from the Haverford 
College Union. The College assumed the responsibility for the care of the building 
First Month 16, 1920. The income is used toward the maintenance of the Union 
building. Present book value, $1,810. .S3. 



FUNDS FOR SCHOLARSHIPS 

THOMAS P. COPE FUND 

Founded in 1842 by gift of sixty shares of Lehigh Coal and Navigation Co. 
stock, par value $3,000, from Thomas P. Cope. Present book value, $5,066.13. 
The income only is to be used "for the education of young men to qualify them 
to become teachers, but who are not of ability to pay their own schooling " This 
fund sustains the Thomas P. Cope Scholarships. 

EDWARD YARNALL FUND 

Founded in 1860 by bequest of $5,000 from Edward Yarnall. Present book value, 
$5,847.96. The income only is to be used for "the support of free scholarships." 
The fund sustains the Edward Yarnall Scholarships. 

ISAIAH V. WILLIAMSON FUND 

Founded in 1876 and increased in 1883 by gifts of sundry ground rents from 
Isaiah V. Williamson. Present book value, $19,094.90. The income only is to be 
used for free scholarships. The fund sustains the Isaiah V. Williamson Scholarships. 

RICHARD T. JONES SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Founded in 1885 by bequest of $5,000 from Jacob P. Jones as a memorial to 
his late son, Richard T. Jones, '63. Present book value, $4,871.92. The income 
only to be used to sustain the "Richard T. Jones Scholarship." 

MARY M. JOHNSON SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Founded in 1897 by bequest of $5,000 from Mary M. Johnson. Accrued interest 
before payment to the College increased the fund by $3,062.95. Present book value, 
$6,757.92. The bequest was to establish a "perpetual scholarship." The fund sus- 
tains the Mary M. Johnson Scholarships. 

SARAH MARSHALL SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Founded in 1897 by bequest of $5,000 from Sarah Marshall. Accrued interest 
before payment to the College increased the fund by $2,589.49. Present book value, 
$7,631.02. The bequest was to establish a "perpetual scholarship." The fund 
sustains the Sarah Marshall Scholarships. 

CLEMENTINE COPE FELLOWSHIP FUND 

Founded in 1899 by gift of $25,000 from Clementine Cope. Present book value 
$22,012.96. The gift was to establish the "Clementine Cope Fellowship F"und to as- 
sist worthy and promising graduates of Haverford College in continuing their course 
of study at Haverford or at some other institution of learning in this country or 
abroad." The selection of the Fellows is made by the Board of Managers upon 
nomination by the Faculty. 

ISAAC THORNE JOHNSON SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Founded in 1916 by gift of $5,000 from Isaac Thorne Johnson, '81. Present 

42 



Haverford College 



book value, $7,807.11. The gift was to establish "The Isaac Thorne Johnson 
Scholarship to aid and assist worthy young men of Wilmington Yearly Meeting 
or of the Central West to enjoy the privileges of Haverford College." Unused 
income is added to the principal of the fund. 

CASPAR WISTAR MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Founded in 1920 by gift of Edward M. and Margaret C. Wistar of $5,000 par 
value in bonds in memory of their son, Caspar Wistar, of the Class of 1902, who 
died in Guatemala in 1917 while engaged in mission service in that country. The in- 
come only is to be used for scholarships, primarily for sons of parents engaged in 
Christian service, including secretaries of Young Men's Christian Associations, or 
students desiring preparation for similar service in America or other countries. 
Present book value, $2,843.61. 

J. KENNEDY MOORHOUSE SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Founded in 1926 by gifts totaling $3,000, with $1,000 added in 1926, and $1,000 
in 1928 and $1,000 in 1929 from the Class of 1900 in memory of their classmate, 
J. Kennedy Moorhouse. The scholarship provided by this fund is "to be awarded, 
whenever a vacancy shall occur, to the boy ready to enter the Freshman class, 
who in the judgment of the President of the College appears best fitted to uphold 
at Haverford the standard of character and conduct typified by J. Kennedy Moor- 
house, 1900, as known to his classmates: A man, modest, loyal, courageous, rever- 
ent without sanctimony; a lover of hard play and honest work; a leader in clean 
and joyous living." Present book value, $4,967.88. 

LOUIS JAQUETTE PALMER SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Founded in 1928 by gift of $5,000 from Triangle Society, as follows: 

"The Triangle Society of Haverford College herewith presents to the Corpora- 
tion of Haverford College, a fund of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000) to be here- 
after known and designated as the 'Louis Jaquette Palmer Scholarship Fund'; 

"This fund represents contributions from the members of the Triangle Society 
of Haverford College who have been thus inspired to perpetuate the memory of 
their fellow member, Louis Jaquette Palmer, of the Class of 1894, one of the found- 
ers of the Triangle Society, whom they admired for his cooperative spirit and 
constructive interest in student and community welfare. The fund is placed with 
the Corporation of Haverford College with the understanding: 

"That such student shall be selected from a list of those eligible for entrance to 
Haverford College, who shall have combined in his qualifications the fulfillment 
of such conditions as apply to applicants for the Rhodes Scholarships under the 
terms of its creation, and furthermore that the student so selected and entered in 
Haverford College may continue to receive said scholarship fund throughout his 
course at College, subject to the approval of the Committee, otherwise preference 
shall be given to applications for the Freshman Class; 

"That the selection of said student and the determination of the qualities and 
conditions hereinbefore mentioned shall be subject to the decision and control of 
a committee of three (3), which committee shall be composed of two (2) members 
of the Triangle Society and the President of Haverford College, the said members 
of the Triangle Society to select and recommend the applicants and the committee 
as a whole to determine their qualifications and eligibility. 

"Finally, in the event that no student is selected by the Triangle Society or 
that a vacancy occurs, the income from said funds and any additions shall accumu- 
late as provided under the customary rules and regulations of the Corporation of 
Haverford College." 

Present book value, $4,817.71. 

PAUL W. NEWHALL MEMORLAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Established in 1931 by bequest of $5,045.60 from Mary Newhall in memory 
of her father, Paul W. Newhall, a Manager, 1844-48, for the establishment of a 
scholarship fund. The income only to be used for free scholarship purposes. 
Present book value, $4,861.6.^. 

43 



Haverford College 

ROBERT MARTIN ZUCKERT MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Founded in 1935 by gift of $750, $2,000 each year 1936 to 1940, and in 1942, 
and $2,500 in 1941, by Harry M. Zuckert, New York, in memory of his son, 
Robert Martin Zuckert, of the Class of 1936, who was killed in an accident in 
June, 1935. The income is to be used for a scholarship and the donor said, 
"I should prefer a boy who is a native of New York or Connecticut and who now 
resides in one of those States." Present book value, $14,813.65. 

SAMUEL E. HILLES ENDOWMENT 

CREATED BY MINA COLBURN HILLES 

Founded in 1935 by gift of $5,000 from Mrs. Mina Colburn Hilles, of Orlando, 
Fla., in memory of her husband, Samuel E. Hilles, Class of 1874, formerly of 
Cincinnati, who died in 1931. This fund was created under a trust deed with Cen- 
tral Title and Trust Co., Orlando, Fla., to whom annual reports are to be made. 
The income only is to be used for scholarships for worthy students who are un- 
able to finance their expenses at Haverford College. Present book value, $4,834.39. 

CLASS OF 1913 SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Founded Fourth Month 15, 1937, by gift of $3,000 from Class of 1913 for the 
endowment of scholarship aid. The income only is to be used for scholarship aid, 
to be awarded annually to a worthy student of any undergraduate class. Prefer- 
ence is to be given to sons of members of the Class of 1913 who mav apply and 
who meet the usual requirements of the College. Present book value $2,890.62. 

THE AUGUSTUS TABER MURRAY RESEARCH SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Founded Fifth Month 31, 1939 by gift from two anonymous friends of Dr. 
Augustus Taber Murray, '85, by gifts of $20,000 par value of securities subject 
to annuity during their lives, and with permission to use principal for the annuity 
payments, if necessary. 

Upon the deaths of the two annuitants, the remaining principal shall be held 
in a fund, the "Income to be used for scholarships in recognition of the scholarly 
attainments of Augustus Taber Murray, a distinguished Alumnus of Haverford 
College, of the Class of 1885, and for many years a professor of Leland Stanford 
University, the fund to be known as 'The Augustus Taber Murray Research 
Scholarship.' Then scholarships in English literature or philology, the classics, 
German literature or philology (in order of preference) shall be awarded upon such 
terms and conditions as the College may from time to time establish to students 
who have received the bachelor's degree at Haverford College, and shall be 
awarded for the purpose of study in other institutions toward the degree of Doctor 
of Philosophy or such degree as may in the future correspond to that degree." 

The amount of the Scholarship is to be $900 a year whenever awarded, and only 
unmarried students are eligible to hold it. Present book value $20,914.34. 

THE CLASS OF 1917 SCHOLARSHIP FUND 
(New This Year) 

Founded Seventh Month 13, 1942 by initial gift of $2,000.00 from the Class 
of 1917, John W. Spaeth, Jr., Treasurer, as a Twenty-fifth Anniversary Gift. 
A further gift of $250.00 was made at the same time to cover the first two years 
of a scholarship of $125.00 per year. Preference is to be given to a son of a member 
of the Class of 1917. The income only is to be used for a scholarship to the e.xtent 
of $150.00 per annum. Further contributions from the members of the Class of 
1917 are to be applied in the following order: 

(1) — To supplement the annual income from the principal sum of $2,000.00, 
so that the annual scholarship stipend shall be $150.00, or as near that sum 
as may be; 

(2) — To add to the principal sum any surplus of these annual contributions 
not needed to serve the purpose of (1). Since the scholarship stipend for the years 
1942-1943 and 1943-1944 is already provided for by the additional $250.00 
already contributed by the Class of 1917, the annual contributions from the Class 
in these two yares may be added at once to the principal sum of $2,000.00, thus 
serving' the pur|)()se of (2) al)o\e. Present book value, $2,357.-35. 

44 



Haverford College 

FUNDS FOR THE LIBRARY 
ALUMNI LIBRARY FUND 

Founded in 1863 by contributions from the alumni and other friends of the 
College. In 1909 the unexpended balance (about $5,000) of a fund of $10,000 
raised in 1892, and known as the "New Library Fund," was merged into the 
Alumni Library Fund. Present book value, $16,799.42. The income is used for 
binding and miscellaneous expenses of the Library. 

MARY FARNUM BROWN LIBRARY FUND 

Founded in 1892 by gift of $20,000 from T. Wistar Brown, executor of the 
Estate of Mary Farnum Brown. Additions were made by T. Wistar Brown in 
1894, $10,000 for a lecture fund, and in 1913, $20,000. In 1916, after T. Wistar 
Brown's death, there was added to this fund $34,499.78 par value of securities, 
book value, $30,149.78, being a trust which he had created for this purpose in 
1908 and to which he had made additions in subsequent years. Present book value, 
$64,421.29. The purpose of this fund (except $10,000) is for the increase and 
extension of the Library. The income only is to be used for the purchase of books, 
and one-fifth of same is to be spent for books promoting the increase of Christian 
knowledge. The books purchased with the income of this fund are marked by a 
special book-plate. The income of $10,000 of the fund is to provide for an annual 
course of lectures upon Biblical subjects designated "The Haverford Library Lec- 
tures." Unused income from the fund, if any, must be capitalized at the end of 
each fiscal year. 

WILLIAM H. JENKS LIBRARY FUND 

Founded in 1910 by gift of $5,000 from Hannah M. Jenks, widow of William 
H. Jenks. The fund was first known as "Special Library Fund," but after the death 
of Hannah M. Jenks was changed, in 1916, to "William H. Jenks Library Fund." 
Present book value, $4,817.71. The purpose of this fund is that the income shall 
be used for the care of the collection of Friends' books made by William H. Jenks 
and given by his widow to Haverford College, and to make appropriated additions 
thereto. Any income not used for these purposes may be used toward the general 
needs of the Library. 



MARY WISTAR BROWN WILLIAMS LIBRARY FUND 

Founded in 1914 by gift of $20,000 from Parker S. Williams, '94, as a memorial 
to his late wife, Mary Wistar Bro-vn Williams. Present book value, $19,566.40. 
The income only is to be used for the purchase of books for the Library, preferably 
books coming within the classes of history, poetry, art, and English and French 
literature. The books purchased with the income of this fund are marked by a 
special book-plate. 



ANNA YARNALL FUND 

Founded in 1916 by residuary bequest of $13,000 par value of securities with 
book value of $7,110, and one-half interest in suburban real estate from Anna 
Yarnall. Additional amount under bequest was received in 1918. Present book 
value, $167,265.06. The real estate was sold in 1923 and netted the College 
$164,820.50. The bequest was made for the general use of the Library. The 
Testatrix says, "I do not wish to restrict the managers as to the particular applica- 
tion of this fund, but desire them to use the income arising f^rom it as in their 
best judgment and discretion shall seem best, for the purchase of books and manu- 
scripts, book cases, rebinding of books, and, if need be, the principal or portions 
thereof, or the income or portions thereof, for additions to the present Library 
building, or the erection of new Library buildings. I direct that all books purchased 
with this fund shall be plainly marked 'Charles Yarnall Memorial' in memory of 
my father, Charles Yarnall." 

45 



Haverford College 
f. b. gummere library fund 

Founded in 1920 by gift of $635.47, raised among the students by the Students, 
Association of the College as a memorial to Professor Francis Barton Gummere! 
The income only is to be used to buy for the Haverford College Library books on 
the subjects that he taught or was interested in. 

The student's Association voted also to raise twenty-five dollars for a special 
shelf in the Library to be known as the "F. B. Gummere Memorial Shelf." This 
shelf, with its proper inscription, holds the books purchased by this fund. Present 
book value, $612.30. 



EDMUND MORRIS FERGUSSON, JR., CLASS OF 1920 MEMOIUAL FUND 

Founded in 1920 by memorial gift of $1,000 from the family of Edmund Morris 
Fergusson, Jr., Class of 1920, who died at the College in his Senior year. The in- 
come only is to be used for the maintenance and increase of the Library's Depart- 
ment of English and American Literature. The books purchased with the income 
of this fund are marked by a special book-plate indicating its source. Present book 
value, $965.80. 



CLASS OF 1888 LIBRARY FUND 

Founded Sixth Month 15, 1938, by gifts totaling $5,250 from members and 
families of the Class of 1888, on the occasion of their fiftieth anniversary. The con- 
ditions of the gift are as follows: 

(U A fund is to be established, to be known as "THE CLASS OF 1888 LIBRARY 
FUND." 

(2) The income only of this fund is to be used exclusively for the purchase of books 
for the Haverford College Library, except as noted below (in Clause 6). 

(3) The fund established now will be added to later by gift or bequest. 

(4) Members of the Class also expect to donate books to the Library, with the 
understanding that when such books are duplicates of books already in the 
Library, they may be exchanged for books needed, or sold, and the money 
so obtained used in the same way as the income of the fund. 

(5) All books purchased by the income of the fund (or obtained as in 4) are to 
be provided with a special book-plate to be furnished by the Class. 

(6) Income from the Class Fund or moneys obtained by sale of duplicate books 
may, when necessary, be used for binding or repair of books designated as 
belonging to the Class collection. In 1939-1940, additional donation of $500 
was made. The present book value is $5,541.02. 



CLASS OF 1918 LIBRARY FUND 

Founded Third Month 24, 1938 by gift from the Class of 1918 in commemora- 
tion of their twentieth anniversity. The gift was $1,753.52 of which $500 was spent 
for a portrait of the late Rayner W. Kelsey, Professor of History, who died Tenth 
Month 29, 1934; and the balance of $1,253.52 was used in establishing a new Li- 
brary Fund, the income to be used for books. Present book value, $1,207.83. 



FUNDS FOR PENSIONS 

PRESIDENT SHARPLESS FUND 

Founded in 1907 by contributions from interested friends of the College, finally 
amounting to $40,000. Present book value, $39,733.67. The income is to be used 
for the teachers and professors of Haverford College as the President of the Col- 
lege and his successors, with the approval of the Board of Managers, may decide. 
The income from this fund is annually transferred to the Haverford College Pen- 
sion Fund for old style pensions, or, if not needed for pensions, is capitalized in said 
fund. 



46 



Haverford College 

WILLIAM p. HENSZEY FUND 

Founded in 1908 by gift of $10,000 from William P. Henszey, donated in con- 
nection with the raising of the President Sharpless Fund, but kept as a separate 
fund. Increased in 1909 by legacy of $25,000 from William P. Henszey. Present 
book value, $35,418.53. The income is to be used, as in the President Sharpless 
Fund, for the teachers and professors of Haverford College as the President of the 
College and his successors, with the approval of the Board of Managers, may de- 
cide. The income from this fund is annually transferred to the Haverford College 
Pension Fund for old style pensions, or, if not needed for pensions, is capitalized 
in said fund. 

JACOB P. JONES BENEFIT FUND 

Founded in 1909 and increased in 1910 by proceeds of land sold for account of 
Jacob P. Jones legacy. Present book value, $65,630.50. The income is to be used, 
as in the President Sharpless Fund, for the teachers and professors of Haverford 
College as the President of the College and his successors, with the approval of 
the Board of Managers, may decide. The income from this fund is annually trans- 
ferred to the Haverford College Pension Fund for old style pensions, or, if not 
needed for pensions, is capitalized in said fund. 

PLINY EARLE CHASE MEMOIUAL FUND 

Founded in 1909 by transfer to the College of a fund raised in 1887 in memory 
of Professor Pliny Earle Chase, and amounting to par value of $4,173.04. Present 
book value, $3,152.93. The income of this fund is used, as in the President Sharp- 
less Fund, for the teachers and professors of Haverford College as the President 
of the College and his successors, with the approval of the Board of Managers, 
may decide. This income is transferred annually to the Haverford College Pen- 
sion Fund, for old style pensions, or, if not needed for pensions, is capitalized in 
said fund. 

HAVERFORD COLLEGE PENSION FUND 

Founded in 1920 and added to since, being accumulations of income from the 
President Sharpless Fund, the William P. Henszey Fund, the Jacob P. Jones 
Benefit Fund and the Pliny Earle Chase Memorial Fund, not needed for pensions. 
Present book value, $107,955.98. The income from this fund, together with the 
income from the four above-mentioned funds, is used for old style pensions. In- 
come not needed for pensions was capitalized until 1932; then any unused income 
was used toward the College's share in cost of new contributory pensions with the 
Teachers' Annuity and Insurance Association. Now the old style pensions call 
for more than the income of all these Pension Funds. When the proper time comes 
in an actuarial sense, the principal of this fund can be used as well as the income for 
the old style pensions until they cease. 

FUNDS FOR SPECIAL PURPOSES 

THOMAS SHIPLEY FUND 

Founded in 1904 by gift of $5,000 from the late Samuel R. Shipley as a memorial 
to his father, Thomas Shipley. Present book value, $5,056.68. The income only 
to be used for lectures on English Literature at the College. In case of actual need, 
at the discretion of the President of the College, the income can be used for general 
expenditures. 

ELLISTON P. MORRIS FUND 

Founded in 1906 by gift of $1,000 from EUiston P. Morris, '48. Present book 
value, $1,085.68. The income is to be used as a prize for essays to be written by 
students on the subject of Arbitration and Peace. "The Elliston P. Morris Prize" 
of $40 is given in each year, the competition being open to all undergraduates 
and to graduates of not more than three years' standing. 

In 1929, it was determined, with the consent of the family of Elliston P. Morris, 
that when the prize is not awarded the income may be used for the purchase of 
library books on arbitration and peace. 

47 



Haverford College 

JOHN B. GARRETT READING PRIZE FUND 

Founded in 1908 by a gift of $2,000 par value of bonds by the late Tohn B. 
Garrett, '54. It was the purpose of the donor to ensure the permanence of a prize 
or prizes for Systematic Reading, which he had given for a number of years. The 
prizes were not awarded from 1922 to 1939 on account of default of the bonds. 
Reorganization has resulted in 1939 in sufficient recovery of value to provide 
again for this prize. Present book value $2,189.40. 

SPECIAL ENDOWMENT FUND 

Founded in 1909 by gift of $12,000 par value of bonds, book value $11,800, 
from an anonymous donor. Present book value, $8,890.67. The income only of 
this fund to be used "to furnish opportunity for study of social and economic and 
religious conditions and duties connected therewith, especially from a Chris- 
tian point of view." The income is used toward the expenses of Summer Schools for 
Religious Study, which have been held at Haverford and Swarthmore Colleges 
from time to time, and also for religious education under Friends' care. 

On Fifth Month 16, 1930, the Managers adopted the following amendment, 
made at the suggestion of the donor, now revealed to be John Thompson Emlen, 
1900: "If, however, it shall in the course of time be deemed advisable by the Presi- 
dent and the Managers that the income of this fund can be used more profitably 
by the College for other purposes than those herewith stated, it is my desire that 
they shall act in accordance with their judgment." 



SCHOLARSHIP IMPROVEMENT PRIZE FUND 

Founded in 1913 by gift of $2,000 par value of bonds, book value, $1,200, from 
John L. Scull, '05. Present book value, $2,213.14. The income only to be used to 
establish two prizes of $50 and $45 annually to the two students in the graduating 
class showing the most marked and steady improvement in scholarship during 
their college course. 



ELIZABETH P. SMITH FUND 

Founded in 1915 by bequest of $1,000 from Elizabeth P. Smith. Present book 
value, $1,680.48. The income only to be used as a prize for the best essays on 
Peace written by students of the College. 



S. P. LIPPINCOTT HISTORY PRIZE FUND 

Founded in 1917 by gift of $2,500 par value of bonds, book value, $2,546.88, 
from beneficiary of the estate of S. P. Lippincott, '86. Present book value, 
$2,454.02. The income only to be used as an annual history prize, which is 
designated "The S. P. Lippincott History Prize." The award is to be made 
on the basis of a competitive essay. In any year when no award is made, the 
income is to be used for the purchase of library books in the field of the 
unawarded prize. 

FRANCIS STOKES FUND 

Founded in 1919 by gift of $5,000 in securities, book value, $5,000, from 
Francis J. Stokes, '94, in memory of his father, Francis Stokes, of the Class of 
1852, and a Manager of Haverford from 1885 until his death in 1916. Present 
book value, $4,933.63. The income is to be used for extending the planting of 
trees and shrubs on the College grounds. The wish is expressed, but not as a bind- 
ing condition of the gift, that the Campus Club should have the direction of the 
expenditure of this income. 



48 



Haverford College 



GEORGE PEIRCE PRIZE FUND 

Founded in 1919 by gift of $600, and increased in 1920 by further gift of $400, 
from Harold and Charlotte C. Peirce in memory of their deceased son, George 
Peirce, '03. Present book value $2,()08.,^<). The income only is to be used for a prize, 
to be called the George Peirce Prize in Chemistry or Mathematics, to the student 
who, in the opinion of the Faculty, has shown marked proficiency in either or in 
both of these studies and who wishes to follow a profession which calls for such 
preparation. Unused income is capitalized, as requested by the founders of the fund. 



LYMAN BEECHER HALL PRIZE FUND 

Founded in 1924 by donation of securities of par value, $2,000, book value, 
$1,820, from the Class of 1898 in commemoration of their 25th anniversary of 
graduation to establish an annual prize of $100 in Chemistry in honor of Doctor 
Lyman Beecher Hall, Professor of Chemistry at Haverford College from 1880 to 
1917. Present book value, $2,076.43. 

NEWTON PRIZE FUND 

Founded in 1925 by donation of five shares of General Electric Co. stock by A. 
Edward Newton, par value, $500, and book value, $1,348.25. Present book value, 
$1,346.79. The income only is to be used for "The Newton Prize in English Litera- 
ture to the undergraduate who shall submit the best essay on some subject con- 
nected with English literature." In 1930, the award was changed to be on the basis 
of Final Honors, and in any year when no award is made the income is to be used 
for the purchase of library books in the field of the unawarded prize. 

EDWARD B. CONKLIN ATHELTIC FUND 

Founded in 1925 and added to in 1926, 1927 and 1929 by Frank H. Conklin, 
'95, in memory of his brother, Edward B. Conklin, '99. Present book value, 
$2,312.51. The income is to be used without restriction in any branch of athletics. 

ARBORETUM FUND 

Founded in 1928 by setting aside $5,000 from proceeds from sale of 5.811 acres 
of land on the southern boundary and southeast corner of the College farm. Until 
otherwise ordered by the Managers, the fund is to be invested and the income only 
is to be used under the direction of the Campus Club for trees and shrubs upon 
the College grounds, or for their care, or for other similar purposes. Present book 
value, $4,420.49. 

WILLIAM ELLIS SCULL PRIZE FUND 

Founded in 1929 by William Ellis Scull, '83, by a gift of $2,000. The income is 
to be used annually, so long as the Managers may judge expedient, as a prize to 
be awarded at Commencement by the Faculty to that upper classman who in 
their judgment shall have shown the greatest improvement in voice and the articu- 
lation of the English Language. The prize is to be known as "The William Ellis 
Scull Prize," Present book value, $1,927.09. 

C. WHARTON STORK ART FUND 

In First Month, 1930, C. Wharton Stork, of Class of 1902, donated to the 
Corporation securities of a then value of $69,000 on account of a contemplated 
gift for the purpose of erecting, equipping, and furnishing an Art Museum at the 
College. Purchases were made by C. Wharton Stork of paintings, which are hung 
in the Library. This fund is to be liquidated and is not included in the total 
of the funds. 



49 



Haverford College 



PAUL D. I. MAIER FUND 

Founded Tenth Month 7, 1936, by bequest of $1,000 from Paul D. I. Maier, 
'96, of Byrn Mawr, Pa. The bequest provides for the continuance of the Class 
of 1896 Prizes of $10 each in Latin and Mathematics, and any balance of income 
is to be used for general purposes. Present book value, $963.54. 

STRAWBRIDGE OBSERVATORY MAINTENANCE FUND 

Founded Second Month 13, 1937, from donations of $5,627.37 from members of 
the Strawbridge family, being the amount in excess of the actual cost of the re- 
building and reequipment of the William J. Strawbridge, '94, Memorial Astronom- 
ical Observatory. The income is used for the maintenance and equipment of 
the observatory. The principal can be used for additional equipment, if so deter- 
mined by the Board of Managers. In 1938 and 1939 an astrographic camera was 
so purchased at a cost of $1,787.83. Present book value $3,699.55. 

JACOB AND EUGENIE BUCKY MEMORIAL FOUNDATION 

Founded Sixth Month 4, 1942 by gift of $2,000.00 from Colonial Trust Com- 
pany of New York and Solomon L. Fridenberg of Philadelphia, co-trustees under 
the will of Eugenie Bucky, deceased (late of New York), the income only to be 
used. At the same time accumulated income of $2,000.00 was also donated as 
Bucky Foundation Gift, this amount to be available for use for the same pur- 
poses as the income of the Foundation. Extracts from Mrs. Bucky's will and 
codicils in reference to the purposes of the Bucky Foundation are here made 
as follows: 

"The purpose or object of such a Foundation or Fund is and shall be for the 
encouragement of them who seek new truths, and who endeavor to free and clear 
from mystery and confusion our knowledge concerning God'; and thereby to 
enforce more effectively the common laws of mutual love and obligation, peace 
and goodwill, between and among our several creeds, races, nations, and markets.^ 

"My aim, intention, purpose and object is to help in promoting piety among 
men, enlightening their ignorance and bettering their condition, by making more 
and more extensive and by spreading among the public at large not only the 
preaching but also the practicing of the words of the . . . American motto 'In 
God We Trust' and of the . . . Preamble to the Constitution for the United States 
of America. I believe and therefore I aim, intend and purpose that the uplifting 
of men, women and children to the standard of life taught in the Scriptures and 
the Constitution for the United States of America is indeed the work of Charity, 
dispels ignorance, inculcates generous and patriotic sentiments, and fits the 
public groups and the individual men or women for their good usefulness in the 
American Commonwealth." 

1. Associated with the American motto "In God We Trust." 

2. Associated with the Preamble of the Constitution for the United States of 
America — "to form a more perfect union, establish justice, insure domestic 
tranquility, provide the common defense, promote the public welfare, and secure 
the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity." Present book value, 
$2,089.23. 

MATHEMATICS DEPARTMENT PRIZE FUND 
(New This Year) 
Founded May 20, 1943 from gifts totaling $900.00 of members of the Mathe- 
matics faculty and others. This capitalized the annual prizes that had been 
given by the Mathematics professors for many years. 

The Mathematics Department Prizes for freshmen, $25.00, are awarded an- 
nually, in competition, by examination. 



50 



STATED MEETINGS OF THE CORPORATION 
AND THE MANAGERS 

The Annual Meeting of "The Corporation of Haverford Col- 
lege" is held on the second third -day in the Tenth month, at 3 
o'clock P.M. 



The Stated Meetings of the Managers for 1943-44 will be held 
on the second Sixth-day of First and Third Months, and on the 
Third Sixth-Day of Fifth, Ninth and Eleventh months. 



LEGACIES 



The friends of the College, including former students, and all 
who are interested in the promotion of sound learning, are in- 
vited to consider the College in the disposition of their estates by 
will. 



FORM OF BEQUEST OF PERSONAL PROPERTY 

I give and bequeath, free and clear of all estate, inheritance or other 
similar taxes, unto the Corporation of Haverford College, the sum of 
Dollars. 



FORM OF DEVISE OF REAL ESTATE 

/ give and devise, free and clear of all estate, inheritance or other 
similar taxes, unto The Corporation of Haverford College, its Suc- 
cessors and Assigns, in fee, the following described real estate: (Here 
describe the real estate.) 



HAVERFORD 

4 

COLLEGE 
CATALOG 

■; - , ^ ;, ■ . " J 



1943-1944 




HAVERFORD COLLEGE BULLETIN 
VOLUME XLII • NUMBER THREE 

December • 1943 



HAVERFORD 
COLLEGE 
CATALOG 

1943-44 




HAVERFORD-PENNSYLVANIA 



1943 


July 


September 


November 


S M T WT F S 


S M T W T F S 
1 21 3 4 


S M T W T F S 




11 2 3 


1 


2 


3| 4 


5 6 


4 


5 6 7 8| 9 10 


5 6 7 8 9 10 


11 


7 8 


9 


10 11 


12 13 


11 


12 13 14 15 16 17 


12 13 14 15 16|l7 


18 


14 15 


16 


17 18 


19 20 


18 19 20 21 22 23 24 


19 20 21 22 23,24 


25 


21 22 


23 


24 25 


26 27 


25126,27,28 29 30 31 


26,27 28 2930I 




28i29 


30 




1 


August 


October 


Decembe 


n 


1 21 31 4 51 61 7 


1 11 2 


1 


2 


3| 4 


8 9 10 11 12 13 14 


3 4 5 6 7 8! 9 


5 6 7 8 9 


10111 


15 16 17)18 19 20 21 


10 11 12 I3I14 15 16 


12 13 14 15 16 


17118 


22 23 24 25 26 27,28 


17 18'l9 20 21 22 23 


19 20 21I22 23 


24 25 


2913031 


24 25l26|27i28,29,30 

31 1 1 1 1 1 


26 27128. 29|30 
1 1 1 


31 


1944 


January 


May 


September 


S M TW T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M TW T F S 








1 


1 2 3 


4 5 6 




1 


2 


2 


3 


4 


5 6 7 8 


7 8 9 10 


11 12 13 


3 4 


5 6 7 8 


9 


9 


10 


11 


12 13 14 15 


14 15 16 17 


18 19 20 


10 11 


12 13 14 15 


16 


16|17 


18 


19 20 21122 


21 22 2324 


25 26 27 


17 18 19 20 21 22 


23 


23 24 


25 


26 27128,29 


28 29 30,31 




24 25|26l27|28 29 


30 


30,31 




1 1 


1 1 




1 1 1 1 




February 


June 


October | 


1 2] 31 4 5 




1 21 3 


1 


2 


3 4 SI 6 7 


6 7 8 9,10:11 12 


4 


5 6 7 8 9 10 


8 


9 


10 11 1213 14 


13 14 15 I6I17I18 19 


11 


12 13 14 15 I61I7 


15 


16 


17 18 19 20 21 


20 21 22,23 24|25i26 


18 


19 20 21 22 23i24 


22 


23 


24 25,26 27 28 


27!28i29l 1 1 1 
March 


25 


26,27|28 29|30| 


29 


30 


31 1 


July 


November | 


1 2 31 4 






1 






1 


2 


3 


4 


5 6 7 8 9 10 11 


2 3 


4 5 6 7 


8 


5 


6 


7 8 


9 


10 


11 


12 13 14 15 16 17|l8 


9 10 


11 12 13 14 


IS 


12 


13 


14 15 


16 


17 


18 


19 20 


21 22|23 24 25 


16 17 


18 19 20 21 


22 


19 


20 


21 22 


23 


24 


25 


26 27 


28|29|30,31 


23 24 


25.26 27l28 


29 


26 


27 


28 29 


30 








1 1 1 


30|31 


1 1 






1 1 








April 


August 


December | 






1 


1 


2 31 41 5 












1 


2 


2 


3 


4 5 6 7 8 


6 7 8 


9 IOI11I12 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


9 


10 


11 12 13 14 15 


13 14 15 


16 17 


18 19 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


16 


17 


18 19 20 21 22 


20 21 22 23 24 


25 26 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


23 


24 


25 26 27128129 


27 28 29,30131 




24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


30 




1 1 1 1 


1 1 1 




31 














1945 


January 


March 


May 


S M TW T F S 

1 21 3) 4 51 6 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 










1 2 


3 




1 


2 


3 


4 5 


7 8 9 lO'll 12113 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 9 


10 


6 


7 8 


9 


10 


11 12 


14 15 16 17|l8 19 20 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 16 


17 


13 


14 15 


16 


17 


18 19 


21 22 23 24 25 26 27 


18 


19 20'21 


22 23 


24 


20 


21 22123 


24 


25 26 


28(29 30'3l| 1 


25 


26127128 


29.30 


31 


27 


28129:3031 




February 


April 


June 








1 2 


3 


1 


2 


3| 41 51 61 7 


1 2 


4 


5 


6 7 


8 9 


10 


8 


9 


10:il|l2|l3|l4 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


11 


12 


13 14 


15 16 


17 


15 


16 


17 


1819 20 21 


10 11 12 13 14 15 16 


18 


19 


20 21 


22,23 


24 


22 23 


24 


25:26 27 28 


17 18 19 20 2122 23 


25 


26 


27128 






29 30 







24 25 26 27 28 29i30 



CONTENTS 

Yearly Calendar 2 

College Calendar 4 

The College 7 

The Officers of the Corporation 11 

Board of Managers and Committees 12 

Faculty 14 

Officers of Administration 20 

Committees of the Faculty and Administration 21 

General Regulations 

Admission 22 

Application for Admission facing 22 

College Entrance Examination Board 23 

Courses of Study 24 

Major Concentration 25 

Degrees 30 

Reconstruction and Relief Unit 32 

Honors 32 

Prizes 34 

Grading of Students 39 

Delinquent Students 39 

Financial Arrangements 

Room, Board, and Tuition 41 

Scholarships and Fellowships 43 

Loan Fund and Employment Bureau 46 

General Information 

Library and Special Collections 47 

Concerts and Lectures 48 

^; Bucky Foundation 49 

Infirmary 49 

Societies, Clubs, and Publications 50 

Preparation for Professions 52 

Courses of Instruction 55 

Degrees Conferred in 1942-1943 90 

Honors Awarded in 1942-1943 

Fellowships, Scholarships and Prizes 91 

Honor Societies 93 

Honors in Special Subjects 94 

Directory of Students, Faculty and Officers 96 

Alumni Associations 105 

Index 107 

3 



CALENDAR 

1943-1944 

Registration of all new students Sept. 20-21, 1943 

Reporting of Freshmen to Dean Macintosh Sept. 20 

Beginning of College Year with Assembly, 11:00 a.m. . . .Sept. 21 

Stated Meeting of the Board of Managers Sept. 22 

Annual Meeting of the Corporation of Haverford College. .Oct. 19 

Stated Meeting of the Board of Managers Nov. 19 

Thanksgiving Day Nov. 25 

Last date for selection of Major Subjects by students who 

have been in attendance three terms Dec. 13 

Christmas Recess (dates inclusive). . . .Dec. 19, 1943-Jan. 2, 1944 

Stated Meeting of the Board of Managers Jan. 21 

Last First Semester classes Jan. 15 

Senior comprehensive examinations and course examina- 
tions for underclassmen.* Jan. 19-22 

Course examinations for all classes Jan. 24-29 

Commencement Day for Graduating Seniors Jan. 29 

Beginning of Second Semester, 8: 10 A.M Jan. 31 

Stated Meeting of the Board of Managers Mar. 17 

Spring Recess (dates inclusive) Mar. 26-Apr. 2 

Last date for selection of Major Subjects by students who 

have been in attendance three terms May 1 

Last date for submission of Prize Manuscripts May 1 

Stated Meeting of the Board of Managers May 19 

Last Classes for Seniors May 13 

Last Second Semester classes May 20 

Senior comprehensive examinations and course examina- 
tions for underclassmen, t May 24-27 

Course examinations for all classes May 29-June 3 

Commencement Day June 3 

* At the option of individual departments, comprehensive examinations may begin on Jan. 18. 
t At the option of individual departments, comprehensive examinations may begin on May 23. 



CALENDAR 

Summer — 1944 

Beginning of Summer Term June 26, 1944 

Last date for selection of Major Subjects by students who 

have been in attendance three terms July 24 

Last Summer Term Classes Aug. 25 

Senior comprehensive examinations* Aug. 23-25 

Commencement Day for Graduating Seniors Aug. 26 

* At the option of individual departments, comprehensive examinations may begin on August 22. 



CALENDAR 

1944-1945 

Stated Meeting of the Board of Managers Sept. 15 

Registration of all new students Sept. 25, 26, 1944 

Reporting of Freshmen to Mr, Macintosh Sept. 25 

Beginning of College Year with Assembly, 11 :00 A.M. . . .Sept. 26 
Annual Meeting of the Corporation of Haverford College at 

the College, 3:00 p.m. (tentative) Oct. 17 

Stated Meeting of the Board of Managers Nov. 17 

Thanksgiving Day Nov. 30 

Last date for selection of Major Subjects by students who 

have been in attendance three terms Dec. 11 

Christmas Recess (dates inclusive). . . .Dec. 21, 1944-Jan, 3, 1945 

Stated Meeting of the Board of Managers Jan. 5 

Last First Semester Classes Jan. 13 

Senior comprehensive examinations and course examina- 
tions for underclassmen* Jan. 17-20 

Course examinations for all classes Jan. 22-26 

Commencement Day for Graduating Seniors Jan. 27 

Beginning of Second Semester, 8:30 a.m Jan. 29 

Stated Meeting of the Board of Managers Mar. 9 

Spring Recess (dates inclusive) Mar. 25-Apr. 1 

Last date for selection of Major Subjects by students who 

have been in attendance three terms Apr. 30 

Last date for submission of Prize Manuscripts April 30 

Stated Meeting of the Board of Managers May 11 

Last Second Semester Classes May 19 

Senior comprehensive examinations and course examina- 
tions for underclassmen t May 23-26 

Course examinations May 28-June 1 

Commencement Day for Graduating Seniors June 2 

* At the option of individual departments, comprehensive examinations may begin on Jan. 16. 
t At the option of individual departments, comprehensive examinations may begin on May 22. 



HAVERFORD COLLEGE 



HISTORY AND DESCRIPTION 

Haverford College was founded in 1833. It owes its origin to 
the insight and energy of a few members of the Society of Friends 
who, in the spring of 1830, conceived the idea of founding an in- 
stitution for education in the higher branches of learning. The ob- 
ject, in the words of the founders, was "to combine sound and 
liberal instruction in literature and science with a religious care 
over the morals and manners, thus affording to the youth of our 
Society an opportunity of acquiring an education equal in all re- 
spects to that which can be obtained at colleges." 

The founders were incorporated in 1833, under the laws of the 
Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, into the Haverford School Asso- 
ciation, a body now known as the Corporation of Haverford Col- 
lege. This corporation elects a Board of Managers for the control 
of its affairs and for the administration of its funds. For the found- 
ing of the School sixty thousand dollars was raised, but the sum 
proved insufficient for its maintenance, and for many years the 
financial deficit was met by subscriptions. 

From 1845 to 1848 the School was closed in order to allow the 
funds to accumulate and to give time for the collection of an en- 
dowment. Since that time, by a number of generous bequests and 
donations, the amount of invested funds yielding income has been 
increased to over four million dollars. 

The College has a pleasant and healthful location in the town- 
ship of Haverford, Delaware County, Pennsylvania, nine miles 
west of the center of Philadelphia. It is accessible by the main 
line of the Pennyslvania Railroad and by the Philadelphia and 
Western Railway. The selection of this site is thus described by 
the first managers: "We wished to procure a farm in a neighbor- 
hood of unquestionable salubrity — within a short distance of a 
Friends' Meeting — of easy access from this city at all seasons of the 
year . , . recommended by the beauty of the scenery and a retired 
situation," And they reported that they had purchased "a tract 
of 198: acres. ..." 

This property has since been increased to 216 acres. While a por- 
tion is retained as farm and woodland, a lawn of sixty acres was 
long ago graded and tastefully planted with trees and shrubs by a 
landscape gardener, so that the natural beauty of the location has 



8 Haverford College 

increased with passing years. The grounds include seven fields for 
football, baseball, cricket and soccer; a running-track, twelve 
tennis courts, and a pond for skating. 

Parallel with its material growth there have been changes in 
the inner life of the College which have affected the methods of 
administration rather than the essential principles on which the 
institution was founded. It has gradually increased in number of 
students, but with a normal enrollment of 400 still enjoys the ad- 
vantages of a small college. From the first it gave instruction of 
collegiate scope and grade. Accordingly, in 1856, the name was 
changed from school to college and the right to confer degrees was 
granted by the Legislature. In 1861 the preparatory department 
was abolished. General courses are now given in arts, science and 
engineering. 

The endowment for salaries and pensions enables the College to 
maintain a faculty of unusual size in proportion to the number of 
students, and to expend for the instruction, board, and lodging 
of each student much more than he pays. The advantages of a 
central location are utilized by bringing to college assemblies, on 
frequent occasions, men and women who have established leader- 
ship in government, business and the professions. Particularly in 
the Social Sciences, where the seminar method is emphasized, 
theoretical instruction is frequently checked against the practical 
experience of visitors prominent in official, industrial and pro- 
fessional life. 

In accordance with the modern ideals of religious and moral 
education, the students enjoy ample liberty, safeguarded by their 
wholesome physical life, by the traditions of the College, and by 
the intimate association with their professors and fellow students. 

All examinations and tests are conducted under an Honor Sys- 
tem administered by the Students' Association. Under the Honor 
System no person, either student or faculty member, acts as of- 
ficial proctor during examinations. Student self-government is 
further emphasized in every aspect of campus life. 

The religious tradition bequeathed by the Quaker founders has 
been carefully cherished, and high ideals of life and conduct are 
maintained. Three times a month the College attends Friends 
Meeting in a body. The aims of Haverford have been gradually de- 
veloping and its function is becoming more and more clear — "to 
encourage the growth, among a limited number of young men, of 
vigorous bodies, scholarly minds, strong characters, and a real 
religious experience." 



History and Description 9 

A degree from Haverford College is in itself a certificate that 
the recipient is intellectually, morally, physically and socially 
equipped to play his part, and in time assume a post of leadership, 
in the occupation and community of his choosing. A large propor- 
tion of Haverford graduates, however, customarily desire to sup- 
plement this equipment with distinctly professional education. 
For students desiring intensive preliminary training in medicine, 
the law, engineering, and other highly specialized subjects, the 
College offers combinations of courses which admit to the best 
professional schools with full standing, and in many cases with 
advanced credit. 

Sample outlines of study at Haverford, preparatory to post- 
graduate specialization in all the major professions, have been 
prepared and may be obtained by application to the Director of 
Admissions. Whether or not he intends to proceed to graduate 
work the student will in all cases plan his course, and select his 
major subject, in consultation with faculty advisers. 

The first College building was Founders Hall, erected in 1833 
and still, with additional wings, in active use. The original as- 
tronomical observatory was built in 1852 and in 1933 was replaced 
by the present newly-equipped structure. The new library, con- 
structed in 1940-41, has special facilities for research and contains 
approximately 160,000 volumes. 

There are four separate dormitories and, besides modern class- 
rooms, well-equipped laboratories for chemistry, physics, biology 
and engineering. The gymnasium was built in 1900; Roberts 
Hall, containing the college offices and a large auditorium, in 1903; 
the Haverford Union, used for many college activities, dates from 
1910; the infirmary was built in 1912. In the summer of 1941 the 
college kitchens were completely modernized and a suitable cam- 
pus dwelling was converted into a Language House with resident 
director. During the summer of 1942 another of the campus 
dwellings was remodeled into a Government House, which has 
rooms for fifteen students and an apartment for its director. 

Science House, opened in 1943, completes the trio of specialized 
student residences, the occupants of which have all the advantages 
of fraternity life without its social discrimination. 

In February, 1943, the College began the academic training of a 
Pre-Meteorology Unit for the Army Air Forces Technical Training 
Command. In September, 1943, an Army Specialized Training 
Unit was added, composed for the most part of Area and Language 
Study trainees. A special Relief and Reconstruction Unit, at 



10 Haverford College 

graduate level, was established during the Summer of 1943. 
Civilian enrollment at the College stands up unusually well, in 
part because of the long standing emphasis on Premedical educa- 
tion at Haverford. During the war emergency period the College 
has been giving instruction and accommodation to approximately 
550 students of all types, thus emphasizing the broad margin 
whereby facilities exceed the normal undergraduate load. 



CORPORATION OF HAVERFORD COLLEGE 
Officers 

Morris E. Leeds, President 4901 Stenton Ave,, Germantown, Phila. 

Felix M. Morley, President of the College Haverford, Pa. 

J. Henry Scattergood, Treasurer 1616 Walnut St., Phila. 

John Flagg Gummere, Secretary W. School Lane and Fox Ave., Phila. 



Members of the Standing Nominating 
Committee of the Corporation 



Term Expires 1944 

Stanley R. Yarnall 5337 Knox St., Germantown, Phila. 

Thomas Shipley Brown Westtown, Pa. 

C. Reed Gary Ellet Lane & Wissahickon Ave., Mt. Airy, Phila. 



Term Expires 1945 

William W. Comfort Haverford, Pa. 

Lovett Dewees Sweetwater Farm, Glen Mills, Pa. 

Theodore B. Hetzel 768 College Avenue, Haverford, Pa. 



Term Expires 1946 

Harris G. Haviland 16th and Race Sts., Phila. 

Archibald Macintosh 3 College Circle, Haverford, Pa. 

Jonathan M. Steere 1318 Girard Trust Bidg., Phila. 



11 



BOARD OF MANAGERS 

Ex-ofiEicio as Officers of Corporation 

Morris E, Leeds, President 4901 Stenton Ave., Phila. 

J. Henry Scattergood, Treasurer 1616 Walnut St., Phila. 

John Flagg Gummere, Secretary W. School Lane and Fox Ave., Phila. 

Term Expires 1944 

J. Stogdell Stokes Stokes and Smith Co., Summerdale, Phila. 

M. Albert Linton 46th and Market Sts., Phila. 

Francis R. Taylor 910 Girard Trust Bldg., Phila. 

Edward Woolman Haverford, Pa. 

Thomas W. Elkinton 121 So. 3rd St., Phila. 

Dr. S. Emlen Stokes Moorestown, N.J. 

Henry Carter Evans 635 Manatawna Ave., Roxboro, Phila. 

William M. Maier Bailey Building, Phila. 

*JOHN K. Garrigues 1102 Westover Rd., Westover Hills, Wilmington, Del. 

Term Expires 1945 

Charles J. Rhoads Ithan Road, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Edward W. Evans 304 Arch St., Phila. 

William A. Battey Liberty Trust Building, Phila. 

Dr. Frederic C. Sharpless Rosemont, Pa. 

John A. Silver Olney P.O., Phila. 

Alfred Busselle 347 Madison Ave., New York, N.Y, 

Walter C. Janney 1529 Walnut St., Phila. 

William B. Bell Rockefeller Plaza, New York, N.Y. 

*Paul Van Reed Miller Girard Trust Bldg., Phila. 

♦Owen B. Rhoads Packard Bldg., Phila. 

Term Expires 1946 

Frederic H. Strawbridge 801 Market St., Phila. 

Jonathan M. Steere 1318 Girard Trust Bldg., Phila. 

L. HoLLiNGSWORTH WooD 103 Park Ave., New York, N.Y. 

Stanley R. Yarnall 5337 Knox St., Germantown, Phila. 

William Wistar Comfort Haverford, Pa. 

Dr. Henry M. Thomas, Jr 1201 N. Calvert St., Baltimore, Md. 

Alexander C. Wood, Jr 511 Chestnut St., Phila. 

Harold Evans 1000 Provident Trust Bldg., Phila. 

♦William Nelson West, HI 1104 Stock Exchange Bldg., Phila. 

Faculty Representatives on Board of Managers 

Term Expires 1944 Term Expires 1945 

Cletus O. Oakley Dean P. Lockwood 

Chairman of Board Secretary of Board 

Morris E. Leeds Edward W. Evans 



* Alumni Representative Managers. 

12 



Standing Committees of the Board of Managers of 
THE Corporation of Haverford College 

Executive Committee 

J. Stogdell Stokes, Chairman Walter C. Janney 

J. Henry Scattergood W. Nelson West, III 

Jonathan M. Steere Dr. S. Emlen Stokes 

Alexander C. Wood, Jr. Thomas W. Elkinton 

Dr. Frederic C. Sharpless Paul V. R. Miller 

Committee on Finance and Investments 

Jonathan M. Steere, Chairman Dr. S. Emlen Stokes 

J. Henry Scattergood M. Albert Linton 

Alexander C. Wood, Jr. John K. Garrigues 

William B. Bell 

Committee on Audit and Accounts 

William A. Battey, Chairman William M. Maier 

Francis R. Taylor W. Nelson West, 3d 

Harold Evans 

Committee on College Property and Farm 

Henry C. Evans, Chairman Edward Woolman 

Frederic H. Strawbridge Alfred Busselle 

Thomas W. Elkinton William M. Maier 

William A. Battey Owen B. Rhoads 
John A. Silver 

Committee on Honorary Degrees 
William W. Comfort, Chairman Stanley R. Yarnall 

L. HOLLINGSWORTH WoOD FrANCIS R. TaYLOR 

Dr. Henry M. Thomas, Jr. , M. Albert Linton 



13 



FACULTY 

Felix M. Morley 

A.B., Haverford College; B.A., Oxford University; Ph.D., Brookings Institution; LL.D., 
Hamilton College and University of Pennsylvania; Litt.D., George Washington University 

President 



Arranged in order of appointment to present rank 

William Wistar Comfort 

A.B., Haverford College; A.B., A.M., and Ph.D., Harvard University; Litt.D., University of 
Pennsylvania; LL.D., University of Maryland, Lake Forest College and Haverford College 

President, Emeritus 
Henry Sherring Pratt 

A.B., University of Michigan; A.M. and Ph.D., University of Leipzig 
David Scull Professor of Biology, Emeritus 

James Addison Babbitt 

A.B., Yale University; A.M., Haverford College; M.D., University of Pennsylvania 

Professor of Hygiene and Physical Education, Emeritus 
RuFUS Matthew Jones 

A.B. and A.M., Haverford College; A.M. and D.D., Harvard University; Litt.D., Penn College 

LL.D., Haverford College, Swarthmore College, Earlham College and Williams College; 

D. Theol., University of Marburg; D.D., Yale University; D. Lit. Hum. Colgate University 

S.T.D., Colby College, Columbia University; 

H. Litt.D., Jewish Inst, of Religion; 

T. Wistar Brown Professor of Philosophy, Emeritus 
Legh Wilber Reid 

S.B., Virginia Military Institute; A.B., Johns Hopkins University; 
S.M., Princeton University; Ph.D., University of Gdttingen 

Professor of Mathematics, Emeritus 
Albert Harris Wilson 

S.B. and S.M., Vanderbilt University; Ph.D., University of Chicago 
Professor of Mathematics, Emeritus 

Henry Volkmar Gummere 

S.B. and A.M., Haverford College; A.M., Harvard University; Sc.D. Haverford College 
Lecturer in Astronomy, Emeritus 

Frederic Palmer, Jr. 

A.B., A.M., and Ph.D., Harvard University 
Professor of Physics 

William Edward Lunt 

A.B. and L.H.D., Bowdoin College; A.M. and Ph.D., Harvard University 
Walter D. and Edith M. L. Scull Professor of English Constitutional History 

Leon Hawley Rittenhouse 

M.E., Stevens Institute of Technology 
Professor of Engineering 

Frank Dekker Watson 

S.B. in Economics and Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 
Professor of Sociology and Social Work 

Dean Putnam Lockwood 

A.B., A.M., and Ph.D., Harvard University 
Professor of Latin 

14 



Faculty 15 

William Buell Meldrum 

B.A. and M.Sc, McGill University; Ph.D., Harvard University 
John Farnum Professor of Chemistry 

Levi Arnold Post 

A.B. and A.M., Haverford College; A.M., Harvard University; 
B.A. and M.A., Oxford University 

Professor of Greek 
Emmett Reid Dunn* 

A.B. and A.M., Haverford College; Ph.D., Harvard University 

David Scull Professor of Biology 
Edward Douglas Snyder 

A.B., Yale University; A.M. and Ph.D., Harvard University 
Professor of English 

Frank Whitson Fetter* 

A.B., Swarthmore College; A.M., Harvard University; A.M. and Ph.D., Princeton University 
Professor of Economics 

John Alexander Kelly 

A.B., Emory and Henry College; A.M. and Ph.D., Columbia University 
Professor of German 

Douglas Van Steere 

S.B., Michigan State College; B.A., Oxford University; A.M. and Ph.D., Harvard University 
Professor of Philosophy 

Richard Manliffe Sutton 

S.B., Haverford College; Ph.D., California Institute of Technology 
Professor of Physics 

Cletus O. Oakley 

B.S., University of Texas; S.M., Brown University; Ph.D., University of Illinois 
Professor of Mathematics 

Ralph M. Sargent 

A.B. Carleton College; Ph.D., Yale University 
Professor of English 

Alfred J. Swan 

B.A. and M.A., Oxford University 
Associate Professor of Music 

John Goodwin Herndon 

A.B. and M.A., Washington and Lee University; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 
Associate Professor of Government 

John William Flight 

B.A., Hope College; M.A., Yale University; B.D. and Ph.D., Hartford Theological Seminary 
Associate Professor of Biblical Literature 

Harry William Pfund 

A.B., Haverford College; A.M. and Ph.D., Harvard University 
Associate Professor of German 

Howard Comfort 

A.B., Haverford College; A.M. and Ph.D., Princeton University; 
F.A.A.R., American Academy in Rome 

Associate Professor of Latin and Greek 
* Absent on leave 1943-44. 



16 Haverford College 

Alexander Jardine Williamson* 

A.B., Haverford College; A.M. and Ph.D., Princeton University 
Associate Professor of Romance Languages 

Roy Earl Randall* 

Ph.B., Brown University 
Associate Professor of Physical Education 

Clayton William Holmes 

B.S., University of New Hampshire; A.M., Haverford College; M.E., University of New Hampshire 
Associate Professor of Engineering 

Thomas Edward Drake 

A.B., Stanford University; M.A., University of Michigan; Ph.D., Yale University 
Associate Professor of American History 

Carl Barnett Allendoerfer 

S.B., Haverford College; B.A and M.A., Oxford University; Ph.D., Princeton University 
Associate Professor of Mathematics 

Howard Morris Teaf, Jr. 

B.S., in Econ., A.M., and Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 

Associate Professor of Economics 

Richard Max Bernheimer 

Ph. T)., University of Munich 
Associate Professor of Art 

Edmund Stinnes 

Ph.D., Charlottenburg Institute of Technology 
Associate Professor of Government 
Howard Knickerbocker Henry 

B.S., University of Pennsylvania 
Assistant Professor of Botany 

MoNTFORT VeRTEGANS MELCHIORf 

A.B., Haverford College; A.M., University of Pennsylvania 

Assistant Professor of Romance Languages 

William Edward Cadbury, Jr.* 

S.B. and A.M., Haverford College; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 
Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

Theodore Brinton Hetzel 

S.B., Haverford College; B.S., in M.E., University of Pennsylvania; 
M.S. and Ph.D., Pennsylvania State College 

Assistant Professor of Engineering 
Thomas Oswell Jones 

B.E., Oshkosh Teachers College; Ph.M. and Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 
Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

Alfred William Haddleton 
Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

Louis C. Green 

A.B., A.M., and Ph.D., Princeton University 
Assistant Professor of Astronomy 

Omar Pancoast, Jr. 

B.S., Johns Hopkins University; Ph.D , Columbia University; C.L.U. 
American College of Life Underwriters 

Assistant Professor of Economics and Sociology 

* Absent on leave 1943-44. 
t Deceased, Oct. 13th, 1943. 



Faculty 17 

Maylon H. Hepp 

A.B., and A.M., Oberlin College, Ph.D., Brown University 
Assistant Professor of Philosophy 

Herbert William Taylor 

A.B., Haverford College; M.D., University of Pennsylvania 
Lecturer in Hygiene 

William Henry Chamberlin 

A.B., Litt.D., Haverford College 

Visiting Professor of Government 

Arlington Evans 

B.P.E., Normal College A.G.U.; M.S., Temple University 
Instructor in Physical Education 

Lindsay A. Lafford* 

Fellow of the Royal College of Organists; Licentiate of the Royal Academy of Music; 
Associate of the Royal College of Music 

Instructor in Music 
Thomas C. Gibb 

A.B., Dickinson College; M.A., Haverford College 
Instructor in English 

John Otto Rantz 

Graduate of the Williamson Free School of Mechanical Trades 
Instructor in Engineering 

Thomas A. Benham 

B.S., Haverford College 

Instructor in Physics 
Raymond Theodore Ohl 

A.B. and M.A., Haverford College; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania; 
F.A.A.R., American Academy in Rome 

Instructor in History 
Francis Cope Evans 

S.B., Haverford College; D.Phil., Oxford University 
Instructor in Biology 

Laurence William Wylie 

B.A., and M.A., University of Indiana; Ph.D., Brown University 
Instructor in French 

Manuel J. Asensio 

B.A., University of Granada, Spain 
Perietal de Aduanas, Academia Oficial de Aduanas, Madrid 

Instructor in Spanish 
Samuel Emlen Stokes, Jr. 

A.B., Haverford College 
Instructor in French 

Thomas H. Eckfeldt, III 

B.S., Haverford College 
Instructor in Chemistry 

Richard William Norton, Jr. 
Instructor in Spanish 

• Absent on leave 1943-44. 



18 Haverford College 

Elisa AsENsro 
Instructor in Spanish 

The Acting Dean and the Registrar are ex-officio members of the Faculty. 



ASSISTANTS 

Alan S. FitzGerald 

Research Associate 

in 

Physics and Engineering 

Robert Atkinson 

B.S., M.A., Haverford College 
Assistant in Physics 

Thomas Elkinton, '44 
Assistant in Chemistry 

Edward Block, '44 

Assistant in Physics 

Richard W. Cole, '44 
Assistant in Physics 

The following Visiting Professors are full or part-time members of the Faculty 
in connection with the training units of the Army Air Force Eastern Technical 
Training Command, the Army Specialized Training Program, and the Recon- 
struction and Relief Unit. 

Aldo Caselli 
D.S.E.R., University of Naples 
Italian Area and Language Study 

Elizabeth W. Comfort 

A.B., Vassar College 
Italian 

Leonidas Dodson 

A.B., Whitlier College; A.M., University of Wisconsin; 
Ph.D., State University of Iowa 

German History 
Martin Foss 

LL.D., University of Jena 
German Area and Language Study 

Chihiro Kikuchi 
B.S., University of Washington; M.A., University of Cincinnati 
Mathematics and Physics 

David B. Kirk 

B.S., Haverford College 

Mathematics 
Hertha Kraus 

Ph.D., University of Frankfurt 
International Relief Administration 

Anne K. Lafford 
German 



Faculty 19 

Albert A. La Fleur 

A.B., A.M.. and Ph.D.. Clark University 
Geography 

Donald P. LeGalley 

B.S., Heidelberg College; M.S. and Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State College 
Physics 

Angeline Helen Lograsso 

A.B. and A.M., University of Rochester; Ph.D., Radcliffe College 
Italian 

Fritz Nova 

A.B. and M.A., Haverford College; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 
German Area and Language Study 

Beatrice C. Oberholtzer 
Italian 

Raymond Theodore Ohl 

A.B. and M.A., Haverford College; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania; 
F.A.A.R., American Academy in Rome 

English 
Abraham Pepinsky 

B.A. and M.A., University of Minnesota; Ph.D., The Stale University of Iowa 
Physics 

Marie F. Pfund 
German 

A. William Salomone 

A.B., La Salle College; A.M. and Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 
Italian Area and Language Study 

Conrad L. B. Shudeman 

B.S. and M.S., University of Texas; Ph.D., Harvard University 
Physics 

George Clarence Vedova 

B.A., International College; M.A., Columbia University; Ph.D., 
University of Maryland 

Mathematics 

DOMENICO VlTTORINI 

A.M., Princeton; Dottore in Lettere. Rome 

Italian History 

Marta Wankowicz 

A.B., Rosemont College 
Polish 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 



Felix M. Morley 

A.B., Haverford College; B.A., Oxford University; Ph.D., Brookings Institution; L.L.D., 
Hamilton College and University of Pennsylvania; Litt.D., George Washington University 

President 
Archibald Macintosh 

A.B., Haverford College; M.A., Columbia University 
Vice President, and Director of Admissions 

Thomas C. Gibb 

A.B., Dickinson College; A.M., Haverford College 
Acting Dean 

William Mintzer Wills 

A.B., A.M., Haverford College 
Comptroller and Registrar 

Dean Putnam Lockwood 

A.B., A.M., and Ph.D., Harvard University 

Librarian 

Robert J. Johnston 
Superintendent 

Herbert William Taylor 

A.B., Haverford College; M.D., University of Pennsylvania 
Physician in Charge 

Louis C. Green 

A.B., A.M., and Ph.D., Princeton University 
Director of the Strawbridge Memorial Observatory 

Thomas Edward Drake 

A.B., Stanford University; M.A., University of Michigan; Ph.D., Yale University 

Curator of the Quaker Collection 
Brinton H. Stone 

A.B., Johns Hopkins University; M.A., Columbia University 
Assistant to the President 

Richard Howell 
Steward 

Amy L. Post 

A.B., Earlham College 
Assistant Librarian 

Mabel S. Beard 

R.N., Lankenau Hospital 
Resident Nurse 

Mary L, Scaife 
Secretary to the President 



20 



STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY 
AND ADMINISTRATION 



The President and Vice-President are Ex-Officio members of all committees. 
These administrative officers, the two faculty representatives on the Board of 
Managers, the three elected divisional representatives of the Faculty, the Co- 
ordinator and Academic Directors of the Army Units and Mr. Stone compose the 
Academic Council. Under the chairmanship of the President this body meets semi- 
monthly throughout the year to consider matters of College policy. The elected 
members for 1943-44 are Messrs. Watson (Social Science), AUendoerfer (Natural 
Sciences) and Sargent (Humanities). 

Admissions 

Mr. Macintosh, Chairman 
Messrs. Jones, Meldrum, Snyder, Sutton 

Curriculum and Honors 

Mr. Lockwood, Chairman 
Messrs. Holmes, Palmer, Pfund, Watson 

Delinquent Students 

Mr. Oakley, Chairman 
Messrs. Green, Herndon, Palmer, Post 

Fellowships and Prizes 

Mr. Pfund, Chairman 
Messrs. Flight, Herndon, Pancoast, Stinnes 

Graduate Students 

Mr. Steere, Chairman 
Messrs. H. Comfort, Kelly, Lunt, Melchior 

Library 

Mr. Sargent, Chairman 
Messrs. Drake, Green, Hepp, Lockwood 

Premedical Education 

Mr. Meldrum, Chairman 
Messrs. Gibb, Henry, Sutton, Taylor 

Publications 

Mr. Morley, Chairman 
Messrs. Rittenhouse, Sargent, Teaf, Wills 

Student Affairs 

Mr. Allendoerfer, Chairman 
Messrs. F. Evans, Haddleton, Melchior, Swan 



21 



GENERAL REGULATIONS 



ADMISSION 

The policy of Haverford College is to admit to the freshman 
class those applicants who, in the opinion of the Committee on 
Admissions, are best qualified to profit by the opportunities which 
the College offers and at the same time to contribute to the under- 
graduate life. Due regard is given not only to scholarly attainment 
as shown by examination and by school record but also to char- 
acter, personality, and interest and ability in important extra-cur- 
ricular activities. 

Whenever practicable, the College will arrange for the candidate 
to have a personal interview with a representative of this institu- 
tion. Every applicant should realize that, in view of the limited 
enrollment, he is entering a competition for admission to a select 
and comparatively small student organization. On the basis of all 
information available — College Board reports, school record, class 
standing, evidence touching on character and personality — the 
application will be accepted or rejected, and the decision of the 
Committee on Admissions is final. Preference will be given to 
those with superior records and credentials rather than to those 
with mere priority of application. 

Students who are accepted will be admitted without conditions. 
To those who on entrance show marked proficiency in certain sub- 
jects, as a result of special tests provided, advanced standing in 
those subjects will be granted. 

Each applicant for admission must take the Scholastic Aptitude 
Test given by the College Entrance Examination Board, and 
usually some achievement tests given by the same Board. Applica- 
tions involving divergence from the normal procedure must be 
discussed in detail with the Director of Admissions. In addition 
the applicant must present, on blanks furnished by the College, 
his school record and a certificate of character signed by his school 
principal. The school certificate must show satisfactory attainment 
in 15 units* of work. 

* "A unit represents a year's study in any subject in a secondary school, constituting approxi- 
mately a quarter of a full year's work. A four years' secondary school curriculum should be regJirded 
as representing not more than 16 units of work." 

22 



Admission 23 

The preparatory course must include four years of English, at 
least a year and a half of Algebra and one year of Geometry, and 
three years of one foreign language and two years of another; or, 
if four units of Latin are offered, two units of a second language 
are required. Cases involving divergence from the requirement 
should be discussed with the Director of Admissions. The remaining 
units will be drawn from laboratory science, history, and addi- 
tional mathematics and language. 

A candidate may offer an elective in a subject not in the usual 
list, if this choice is approved by the Admissions Committee, and 
if he shows proficiency that indicates an amount of study and 
intellectual effort commensurate with that required in other 
subjects. 

Information Concerning Tests of the College Entrance 
Examination Board 

In addition to the Scholastic Aptitude Test of the College 
Entrance Board, which is required of all candidates for admission, 
each candidate shall take, after consultation with the Admissions 
Office, three of the Achievement Tests offered by the Board. 

A single Bulletin of Information containing rules for the filing 
of applications and the payment of fees, lists of examination 
centers, etc., may be obtained without charge from the College 
Entrance Examination Board. The Board does not publish a de- 
tailed description of the Scholastic Aptitude Test or the Achieve- 
ment Tests. A practice form of the former test will be sent to every 
candidate who registers for it. 

Candidates should make application by mail to the College 
Entrance Examination Board, P.O. Box 592, Princeton, New 
Jersey. Blank forms for this purpose will be sent to any teacher or 
candidate upon request. When ordering the forms, candidates 
should state whether they wish to take the December, April, June, 
or September tests. 

In order to facilitate the arrangements for the conduct of the 
tests, all applications should be filed as early as possible. Each 
application should be accompanied by the appropriate examina- 
tion fee, which is four dollars for candidates who take only the 
Scholastic Aptitude Test and eight dollars for all other candidates. 
Applications and fees should reach the office of the Board by 
November 13, 1943, for the December 1943 tests, March 25, 1944, 
for the April tests. May 13, 1944, for the June tests, and August 16, 
1944, for the September tests. 



24 Haverford College 

When a candidate has failed to obtain the required blank form 
of application, the regular fee will be accepted if it arrives not 
later than the specified date and is accompanied by the candidate's 
name and address, the exact examination center selected, the 
college to which his report is to be sent, and the test or tests he 
is to take. 

The Board will report the results of the tests to the institution 
indicated on the candidate's application. The colleges will, in turn, 
notify the candidates of the action taken upon their applications 
for admission. Candidates will not receive reports upon their tests 
from the Board. 

Advanced Standing 

Since Haverford offers an integrated education, admission with 
advanced standing is granted only in a limited number of cases. 
An undergraduate who comes from an approved college must sub- 
mit an official statement of his honorable dismissal, together with a 
full list of his accepted preparatory subjects, and a list of all his 
college courses with his record therein. 

COURSES OF STUDY 

Haverford College recognizes each matriculate as an individual 
whose training in the past and whose plans for the future may 
differentiate him from his fellows. The College accordingly lays 
out tentatively an individual plan of study for each student at 
the beginning of his Freshman year. This plan is confirmed or 
modified for each succeeding year. 

In making each plan, the College directs Faculty members to 
see to it that the student takes in his Freshman and Sophomore 
years certain courses which are required in his case and that he 
distributes his limited electives so as to make the plan both broad 
and sound. 

Twenty academic courses plus three Physical Education courses 
are required for graduation. The academic courses may be classi- 
fied as follows: 

Required 1 

Limited Electives 5 or 6 

(Foreign Language 1 or 2, others 4) 

Major Concentration (average) 6 

Free Electives 7 or 8 

Total 20 

For those who undertake an accelerated program the equiva- 
lent of thirty-six courses of one term each are required. The num- 



Courses of Study 25 

bers of required courses, limited electives, average major concen- 
tration courses are the same as for those who do not accelerate. 

Required Courses 

Two one-term courses in English, and Physical Education 1, are 
required of all Freshmen. Physical Education 2 and Physical Edu- 
cation 3 are required of all Sophomores and Juniors respectively. 

Limited Electives 

It is the conviction of Haverford College that the study of Greek 
and Latin offers both general and specific values which ought not 
to be lightly omitted from the education of its students; in view 
of this conviction the College may advise and, where it deems 
necessary, is prepared to require the study of these subjects. 

1. Each student who is a candidate for the Bachelor's degree 
should present at entrance three units of one foreign language and 
two of another. After entrance he must pass either one course in 
a language which he has presented for entrance or two courses in a 
third foreign language. 

2. Each student must pass a course of two terms or two courses 
of one term each in Literature, either English or foreign, from the 
following list: English 8b, lla, 12b, Ub, 2la, 2lb, 22b, 23a, 26b, 
27a, 30b, 32b, 41a, 426, and 43a; French 166, 17a, 186, 19a; Ger- 
man 5a, 6b, lla, 126, 13a, 146, 15a, 176, and 186; Greek 2, 3a, 4:b, 
7a, 86, 9a, 106, and 27a; Latin 5a, 66, 7, 9a, 106, 11; Spanish 3, 
5a, 66, and 7. Any course in Art or Music, may be substituted for a 
literature course, with the permission of the departments con- 
cerned. 

3. Each student should present one course involving laboratory 
work in Biology, Chemistry, or Physics, or must take one after 
entrance. 

4. Each student must pass a course of two terms or two courses 
of one term each chosen from Biblical Literature la, 26, 46, 5a, 66, 
86; Philosophy 5, 7a, 9a, 106, 17a, 186, or Sociology la, 26, 46. 

5. Each student must pass a course of two terms or two courses 
of one term each in Economics, Government, or History. 

Major Concentration 

A student may elect to major in any one of the following depart- 
ments; Art, Astronomy, Biblical Literature, Biology, Chemistry, 
Economics, Engineering, English, French, German, Government, 



26 Haverford College 

Greek, History, Latin, Mathematics, Philosophy, Physics, Soci- 
ology, Spanish. 

Definite requirements of each department are stated under the 
name of the department on pages 55-89 and are understood as 
applying to the class of 1947. During the fourth term of his at- 
tendance each student should confer with the Major Supervisor of 
the department in which he wishes to major, and must apply to him 
for written approval of a program of courses for the last four terms. 
Such a program must provide for the completion by the end of 
the Senior year of no fewer than six courses, at least three of which 
must have been in the major department and the others in closely 
related fields. Courses taken before the Junior year are included 
or not, at the discretion of the Major Supervisor. Should the 
student's application be rejected by the department of his first 
choice, he must immediately apply in another. Failure to file with 
the Dean, before the date specified on the College Calendar, a copy 
of his Major program, signed by his Major Supervisor, will entail 
a fine of $5. Any student who continues delinquent in this matter 
will be debarred from the final examinations in his fourth term. 
Should the student's application be rejected by all the depart- 
ments to which he applies, he will not be promoted. 

A student who applies for permission to become a Major in 
any Department may be rejected for scholastic reasons only. The 
College rule on this point is: 

If, at the time specified for application, the average of the grades 
obtained by a student in the preliminary courses and "major re- 
quirements" of any department is 75 or above, the student will 
be accepted by that department. 

If the average of the grades obtained in these courses is below 70, 
the student will be accepted in that department only under excep- 
tional circumstances. 

If the average of the grades obtained in these courses is 70 or 
above, but below 75, the decision will be at the discretion of the 
Major Supervisor. 

The phrase "preliminary courses," above, is understood to 
mean any courses the student may already have taken in the de- 
partment for which he is applying. If the applicant has not al- 
ready taken any courses in that department, the department 
should name courses in other departments which might be re- 
garded as "preliminary." 

On a student's official major card shall be listed only those major 
courses and closely related courses which constitute his major 



Courses of Study 27 

program. The student chooses his own free elective courses for his 
last four terms, after consultation with his Major Supervisor, 
"whose power outside the field of major concentration is, how- 
ever, merely advisory." (Catalog, 1937, page 36.) To permit the 
student to change his plans, at his discretion, regarding these free 
electives, they should never be included on the major card. 

Each student shall consult with his Major Supervisor within the 
first two weeks of each term during his last four terms for the 
purpose of reviewing his program of courses. Due notice of this 
responsibility is to be given by the Dean to the students and to 
the Major Supervisors. 

Each Senior must take a special Major examination (written, 
oral, or both) during the week preceding the final examination 
period. The passing grade for this examination is 70. In case of 
failure a candidate may, with the permission of his Major depart- 
ment, present himself for re-examination at a date (to be de- 
termined by the Major Supervisor) later than Commencement 
Day of the current year. 

If the re-examination be taken one year later, during the regular 
period of major examinations, there is no fee. But if the candidate 
applies for re-examination at an earlier date (involving the prepa- 
ration of a special examination for one individual) and if the 
request is granted, the fee is $25.00. 

A student who has been formally accepted as a Major by any 
department has the right to remain as a Major in that department 
as long as he is in College. Should he wish to change from one de- 
partment to another after the beginning of his fifth term, the 
change can be made only by the consent of the two Major Super- 
visors concerned and the Dean. 

In order to allow time for preparation for the Major examina- 
tion, any Senior may omit, with the consent of his Major Super- 
visor, one non-Major half-year course in the second half-year. 

Examination in the Major subject in courses taken in the 
Senior year may be omitted at the discretion of the Major Super- 
visor. 

Free Electives 

A number of courses sufficient to bring the total to twenty 
academic courses shall be chosen by the student, with the under- 
standing that for the Freshman and Sophomore years the College 
reserves the right through the Dean to prevent unreasonable com- 
binations of courses but that in the Junior and Senior years the 



28 Haverford College 

student will choose his free electives after consultation with his 
Major Supervisor, whose power outside the field of major concen- 
tration is, however, merely advisory. 

Programs 
Freshman Program 

Although the Dean is instructed to lay out for each Freshman a 
plan of study suited to his special needs, the Faculty requires 
that English be taken throughout the year, and recommends in all 
usual cases that Freshmen take one or two foreign languages (in- 
cluding Latin or Greek if desirable), and two or three courses 
chosen from History, Mathematics, and Science, not more than 
one in any one of those fields. 

The courses open to Freshmen, in addition to the required work 

in English and Physical Education, are: 

Biology 1 or 2 Greek 1, 2, 3 

Chemistry 1 or 2 History 1 

Engineering la, 26, 10& Latin 1, 3, 5a, 6&, 7 

French 1, 2 or 3 Mathematics 1 

German 1, 2 or 3 Physics 1 or 1-2 

Government Za Spanish 1 or 3 

In special cases, Freshmen may be admitted to certain other 
courses with the consent of the Dean. 

A Freshman will not be permitted to take more than five courses, 
in addition to Physical Education, except with special consent of 
the Faculty. As to requisite grades, see page 39. 

Sophomore, Junior, and Senior Programs 

A Sophomore, Junior, or Senior must take five courses, besides 
Physical Education, and may not take more than five, unless he 
receives the special permission of the Academic Council or is re- 
quired to repeat or substitute a course, in which case he must ob- 
tain the consent of the Dean. For promotion and graduation 
grades, see page 39. Unless otherwise specified all courses offered 
in any term are open to Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors. 

A member of the three upper classes is expected to assume full 
responsibility for his academic program term by term, but the 
help of the Faculty and of the Administration is freely available 
in regard to immediate and general programs. During the war all 
students in College are required to file in the current term a tenta- 
tive program for the next term, so that plans can be made for 
offering courses. 



Courses of Study 29 

Special Cases 

Whenever a student gives proof of special aims and abilities, 
the College is prepared to lay aside such requirements of the pre- 
ceding plan as stand between him and the accomplishment of his 
ambitions. An undergraduate who is not required to take extra 
work because of a deficiency or delinquency may take extra 
courses at a charge of $25.00 for each extra semester course, by 
applying to the Academic Council. No refund will be made to a 
student who drops a sixth course after the first two weeks of a 
semester. 

Conflicting Courses 

A student is not allowed to elect conflicting courses, except with 
the permission of the Dean and the two instructors concerned. 
In case of conflict involving a repeated course the repeated course 
takes precedence. 

Intercollegiate Courtesy 

Because of the cooperative relationship now existing between 
Bryn Mawr College, Haverford College, Swarthmore College, and 
the University of Pennsylvania, full-time students of one of these 
four institutions may, upon presentation of the proper credentials, 
enroll for courses in another institution of the group. This institu- 
tional courtesy does not involve the payment of additional fees 
except in the case of laboratory courses, in which case the visiting 
student will be charged the same laboratory fees or deposits as 
students in the institution to which he goes. 

Students desiring to take advantage of this arrangement should 
secure the permission of the Academic Council through the Dean, 
and also the permission of the chairman of the Department at the 
College under which the course involved would most naturally 
fall. It is also desirable that the instructor giving the course be 
consulted in advance. 

Graduate students will obtain similar permission from the Com- 
mittee on Graduate Students. Ordinarily the holder of a graduate 
fellowship will not be permitted to take more than one course in 
another institution for credit on his Haverford record. 

The Presidents of Bryn Mawr, Swarthmore, and Haverford 
consult at regular intervals to further cooperative arrangements 
between their respective institutions. 



30 Haverford College 

DEGREES 

Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science 

Students who have received credit for the full number of courses 
in prescribed and elective studies, provided they have for the 
Junior and Senior years respectively a general average, for the 
year, of 70 or above, and provided they have passed their Major 
examinations with a grade of 70 or above, are granted the degree 
of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science. The normal degree 
conferred upon all candidates meeting these requirements is that 
of Bachelor of Arts. However, upon request by the candidate, and 
approval by the department concerned, the Bachelor of Science 
degree will be granted to men majoring in Natural Science, 
Mathematics, or Engineering. The fee for the Bachelor's degree 
is $15. 

Master of Arts and Master of Science 

Admission to Candidacy. — Graduates of Haverford College or an 
institution of equivalent standing, who present satisfactory evi- 
dence of character, seriousness of purpose, and scholarly attain- 
ments, may be admitted as candidates for the degree of Master of 
Arts or Master of Science. A candidate should have a reading 
knowledge of one foreign language, ancient or modern. 

Requirements. — A candidate who is well prepared for advanced 
study in his special field is required to pass four advanced courses 
(each with a grade of not less than 80) and to do satisfactory addi- 
tional intensive work, equivalent at least to a full course, which 
may take the form of a thesis or other research. (In a full year 
course in which credit is not granted for the work of a single 
term, the course grade is the average of the two term grades; in 
other cases each term's work is a separate course, for the pur- 
poses of this requirement.) At least two of the courses and the 
additional intensive work must be in the same field and the re- 
maining courses in allied subjects. In addition, the candidate 
may, at the discretion of the professor in charge, be required to 
pass a comprehensive examination upon the field of his major 
subject. The scope of the examination will be determined by the 
professor in charge, and will be communicated to the candidate 
when he is admitted as a graduate student. The entire plan of 
study must be drawn up by the candidate in consultation with the 
professor under whom he proposes to do the major part of his 
work. This plan must be submitted for approval before October 1 



Degrees 31 

to the Chairman of the Committee on Graduate Students. After 
approval by this Committee, the program must be filed with the 
Registrar. Before award of the Master's degree the candidate must 
deposit two copies of his thesis in the College library. 

A minimum of one year's residence is required, and a candidate, 
if well prepared, should be able to complete his work for the degree 
in this time. If his preparation is inadequate a longer period of 
residence may be necessary, but candidates for the Master's degree 
must complete the required work in not more than two academic 
years. Courses taken before the registration of the candidate as a 
graduate student at Haverford College will not usually be counted 
toward the degree. 

Candidates who engage in any occupation or employment other 
than graduate study will not in general be able to satisfy the re- 
quirements for the degree in one year. 

Charges. — The charges for a Graduate Student are: tuition, 
$450; board, $300; lodging, $175. The fee for the Master's degree 
is $20. Laboratory fees, supplies, breakage, and incidentals are 
extra. 

Fellowships. — Six graduate fellowships of $800 each are avail- 
able each year primarily for members of the Society of Friends 
and for the graduates of other Friends' Colleges in the United 
States, who wish to proceed with their education in any depart- 
ment of Haverford College which may be selected, provided the 
proposed schedule of study is approved by the Committee on 
Graduate Students. Any recipient of a graduate fellowship should 
have additional resources of at least $300. The board and lodging 
must be at Haverford College unless by arrangement with the 
Dean they are taken at the neighboring Quaker community of 
Pendle Hill. 

Applications should be accompanied by a certified list of the 
applicant's courses and grades as an undergraduate, three letters 
concerning the character, personality, financial condition and 
qualifications of the applicant, a copy of the catalog of the 
institution in which the applicant was an undergraduate, and a 
small photograph. Applications and material should be in the 
hands of the Dean of Haverford College before March 1st to 
secure consideration for the following year. 



32 Haverford College 

GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS FOR STUDY 
IN RECONSTRUCTION AND RELIEF 

By act of the Faculty of Haverford College on March 18 and 
by the Board of Managers on March 19, 1943, the Reconstruction 
and Relief Course was declared a possible field for specialization 
for the Master of Arts or the Master of Science degree at Haver- 
ford College; the Master of Arts and the Master of Science degrees 
were also open to women; and the six Thomas Wistar Brown 
graduate fellowships of $800 each were declared open to men and 
women candidates intending to specialize in the field of Recon- 
struction and Relief, provided that the other conditions of this 
trust were fulfilled. 

Only those candidates approved by the Faculty Graduate Stu- 
dents Committee as suitable for graduate study, will be permitted 
to receive credit toward a graduate degree while taking these 
training courses in the Reconstruction and Relief Unit. Further, 
it is to be noted that graduate credit is only to be allowed in those 
courses which are declared open to graduate study. In the case 
of the Reconstruction and Relief courses, all courses in the exist- 
ing Specialization curriculum, with the exception of the elementary 
language courses, however, are open to graduate study. The usual 
requirement of a minimum grade of 80 in each course for gradu- 
ate students will be maintained. 

For well-prepared candidates from colleges of high standing, it 
would be possible to complete the course work for the Master of 
Arts or Master of Science degree in the twelve months of resident 
academic study designated in the graduate course of the Recon- 
struction and Relief training. The Master of Arts thesis would 
alone remain to be completed outside of this time. Arrangements 
have been made for an extension of time for completing theses 
for those actively engaged in Relief and Reconstruction service 
abroad. 

HONORS 

Honors are awarded for excellence in the studies of single de- 
partments. They are never given merely for performance of 
routine work in courses, but a considerable amount of extra work 
is demanded in every case. 

Honors are of three kinds: Honorable Mention, Preliminary 
Honors, and Final Honors. 



Honors 33 

Honorable Mention^ will be awarded at the end of the Freshman 
or Sophomore years for work in a single course meeting at least two 
hours per week throughout the year, and additional work to the 
total amount of not less than 60 hours. Candidates for Honorable 
Mention must obtain a minimum grade of 85 in the regular work 
of the course and pass creditably an examination on the additional 
work required. Two courses of one term each in the same depart- 
ment may be construed as a single course. 

A Freshman who has received the prescribed grade in the regular 
work of a course required for Honorable Mention, but who has not 
done the additional work required in connection with such course, 
may, with the consent of the professor in charge, do so during the 
Sophomore year. 

Preliminary Honors will be awarded at the end of the Sopho- 
more or Junior year for work in not less than two courses of two 
terms each in a single department, and additional work to the 
total amount of not less than 120 hours. Candidates for Prelimi- 
nary Honors must obtain a minimum average grade of 85 in the 
courses required for such honors and a grade satisfactory to the 
Department in such of these courses as are taken in the Sophomore 
or Junior year, and must pass creditably examinations on the 
additional work required. 

Final Honors are graded as Honors, High Honors, or Highest 
Honors. They will be awarded upon graduation only to students 
whose work m a major field of concentration has been done with 
marked distinction and has been more profound or more extensive 
in its scope than the minimum required. The award of Honors is 
at the discretion of the major department, but the award of High 
or Highest Honors is to be made by vote of the Faculty upon 
recommendation of a department or group of related departments. 
In order to receive High or Highest Honors, the student will 
usually be given a public oral examination, and for Highest Hon- 
ors, the verdict of an outside examiner may be obtained if deemed 
desirable. The various departments and divisions will adopt such 
specifications for Final Honors as they see fit. 

At the time of the award of Honors there shall be added to the 
general average for the year of each student receiving Honors, 

t Honorable mention is awarded in Freshman English in connection with the work of the 
econd half-year (English 26). 



34 Haverford College 

one-half of one per cent for each award of Honorable Mention or 
Preliminary Honors. Honors, High Honors, and Highest Honors 
shall automatically add one, two, and three per cent respectively 
to the average for the Senior year of each student receiving such 
award. 

PRIZES 

All material submitted in competition for prizes should be de- 
posited with the Registrar under assumed names, with a sealed 
envelope containing the writer's real name, before May 1. 

All prizes awarded in books are marked with appropriate book- 
plates. As soon as possible after the award a list of standard books, 
from which selection is to be made, should be submitted for ap- 
proval to the head of the department awarding the prize. Books 
selected from the approved list may then be ordered through the 
College Office or elsewhere. The College grants an average dis- 
count of ten per cent on prize books, and supplies the bookplates. 

Alumni Prize for Composition and Oratory 

The Alumni Association, in the year 1875, established an an- 
nual prize of $50 in money for excellence in composition and ora- 
tory. 

The Everett Society Medals 

To the members of the winning team in the annual Sophomore- 
Freshman extemporaneous debate, medals are given in memory of 
the Everett Society. 

John B. Garrett Prizes for Systematic Reading 
IN Literature 

A first prize of $50 and a second prize of $25 will be given at the 
end of the Junior or Senior year to the two students who, besides 
creditably pursuing their regular course of study, shall have car- 
ried on the most profitable program of reading in a period or com- 
prehensive topic in the field of literature (ancient, American or 
foreign) during at least two years of their college career. 

The administration of these prizes is in the hands of the Com- 
mittee Fellowships and Prizes, with which the candidate shall 
register and which shall approve the subject chosen. The Commit- 
tee will then recommend the candidate to the Department (s) to 
which he should apply for counsel and guidance. An oral examina- 
tion will be arranged in the final year to determine the scope and 
quality of the reading. 



Prizes 35 

The winners will be determined by the Committee after consul- 
tation with the Departments concerned. Either or both of these 
prizes may be omitted if, in the judgment of the Committee, the 
work does not justify an award. 

The Class of 1896 Prizes in Latin and Mathematics 

These are two prizes worth $10 each. They will be awarded in 
books at the end of the Sophomore year to the students who have 
done the best work for the two years in Latin and Mathematics, 
respectively. 

The Lyman Beecher Hall Prize in Chemistry 

The Class of 1898 on the twenty- fifth anniversary of their 
graduation established a prize in honor of Lyman Beecher Hall, 
Professor of Chemistry at Haverford College from 1880 to 1917. 

This prize amounts to $100 and may be awarded to a student 
who has attained a high degree of proficiency in chemistry and 
who shows promise of contributing substantially to the advance- 
ment of the science. This prize may be awarded to a Junior, to a 
Senior, or to a graduate of Haverford College within three years 
after graduation. It may be awarded more than once to the same 
student, or may be withheld. 

The Class of 1902 Prize in Latin 

The Class of 1902 offers a prize of $10 in books to the Freshman 
whose work in Latin, in recitation and examinations combined, 
shall be the most satisfactory to the professor in charge of the de- 
partment. 

The Department Prizes in Mathematics 

A first prize of $15 and a second prize of $10 are awarded on 
the basis of a three hour examination on selected topics in Fresh- 
man Mathematics. The examination is held on the first Monday 
after the Spring Recess, and is open to Freshmen only. 

The Elliston P. Morris Prize 

A prize of $40, open to all undergraduates and to graduates of 
not more than three years* standing, is offered every year for the 
best essay bearing on the general problem of "International Peace 
and the Means of Securing It." No prize will be awarded unless a 
high standard of merit is attained. Essays should be deposited 



36 Haverford College 

with the Registrar before May 1. The judges shall be appointed 
by the President of the College. For the 1943-44 competition the 
following subjects are offered : 

1. A Critical Evaluation of Leading Proposals for Post- War 
Reconstruction . 

2. What Could We Expect of a Negotiated Peace? 

3. A Concrete Contribution to European Peace: Danzig and 
Fiume as Future Free Ports.* 

4. America's Part m Post- War Organization. 

The presentation should be not merely a catalog of events but 
also an interpretation and estimate of them. Each essay should con- 
tain references, in the form of footnotes and bibliography, to the 
authorities consulted. 

Essays submitted by undergraduates for this prize may also 
be submitted for the Elizabeth P, Smith Prize, but the two prizes 
will not be awarded to one person. 

The Elizabeth P. Smith Prize 

A prize of $40 is offered annually to the undergraduate who pre- 
sents the best essay on international peace under the same condi- 
tions and terms as the Elliston P. Morris Prize. Essays for this 
prize should be deposited with the Registrar before May 1. The 
judges shall be appointed by the President of the College. 

Prizes in Philosophy and Biblical Literature 

A prize of $40 in books is offered each year to the student 
who, in the judgment of the professor in charge, does the most 
satisfactory amount of outside reading in philosophy in connection 
with the courses in that department. A second prize of $25 in 
books is also offered. 

A prize of $40 in books is offered each year to the student 
who, in the judgment of the professor in charge, does the most 
satisfactory amount of reading on the Bible and related subjects. 
A second prize of $25 in books is also offered. 

These prizes may be competed for during any year of the Col- 
lege course. 

The Scholarship Improvement Prizes 
A first prize of $50 and a second prize of $45 will be given at the 

♦ A student may concentrate on a study of either Danzig or Fiume if he wishes to focus his 
essay in that way. 



Prizes 37 

end of the Senior year to the two students who, in the opinion of 
the judges appointed by the President of the College, show the 
most steady and marked improvement in scholarship during their 
college course. 

The Class of 1910 Poetry Prizes 

Two prizes of $15 and $10 respectively are awarded for the best 
verse written by a Haverford undergraduate during the year. 
Typewritten manuscript, under an assumed name, should be de- 
posited with the Registrar not later than May 1. The judges shall 
be appointed by the President of the College. 

The Logan Pearsall Smith Prize 

An annual award of $50 in books will be made to that member 
of the Senior Class who, in the opinion of the Committee on Prizes, 
has the best personal library. Consideration of the books collected 
will be entirely independent of their cost. 

Candidates must register with the Committee on Fellowships 
and Prizes before March 1. The contest closes May 1. By that date 
every candidate shall have deposited with the Registrar a list of 
books and a brief essay explaining the purpose of his collection. 

The Founders Club Prize 

A prize of $25 is offered by the Founders Club to the Freshman 
who is judged to have shown the best attitude toward college 
activities and scholastic work. 

The S. p. Lippincott Prize in History 

A prize of $100 is offered for competition in the Department of 
History under the following general provisions : 

First — The prize may be withheld in any year, if the conditions 
listed below are not met by any of the competitors to the satisfac- 
tion of a majority of the judges. 

Second — The prize shall not be awarded twice to the same stu- 
dent. 

Third — Competition is open to Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors 
who have taken or are taking work in the Department of History. 

Conditions 

In competition for this prize an essay shall be submitted of not 
less than 5,000 words, offered as evidence of scholarly ability in 
the collection and presentation of historical material, treating a 



38 Haverford College 

subject selected from a list announced by the Department of 
History before November 15. The essay should contain references 
in footnotes to the authorities consulted and a bibliography of 
works cited. 

The essay shall be typewritten and deposited under an assumed 
name with the Registrar before May 1. 

For the competition of 1943-44 the following subjects are sub- 
mitted : 

1. The Attempt to Obtain General Disarmament and Collective 
Security from 1919 to 1934. 

2. The Relations between Great Britain and the United States 
from 1823 to 1854. 

3. The Philosophy of the American Revolution. 

4. The Antislavery Movement in the United States from the 
Prohibition of the Foreign Slave Trade to the Civil War. 

The Newton Prize in English Literature 

The Newton Prize in English Literature ($50) may be awarded 
annually on the basis of Final Honors in English, provided that 
the Department judges that the work of the leading candidate 
merits such award. 

The William Ellis Scull Prize 

The William Ellis Scull Prize ($50) will be awarded annually 
to the upper classman who shall have shown the "greatest achieve- 
ment in voice and the articulation of the English language." 

The George Peirce Prize in Chemistry or Mathematics 

In memory of Dr. George Peirce, 1903, a prize of $50 is offered 
annually to a student of Chemistry or Mathematics "who has 
shown marked proficiency in either or both of these studies and 
who intends to follow a profession which calls for such preparation. 
Preference is to be given to a student who has elected organic 
chemistry, and failing such a student, to one who has elected 
Mathematics or some branch of Chemistry other than organic. 
Should there be two students of equal promise, the one who is 
proficient in Greek shall be given preference." The prize is offered, 
however, exclusively for students who expect to engage in research, 
and it will not be awarded unless the candidate has this expressed 
intention. 



Grades 39 

The National Foundation for Education in 
American Citizenship Prize 

A cash prize of $100 for the best essay, by a Haverford under- 
graduate, on the subject of "The Basic Principles Underlying the 
Government of the United States" is offered by this Foundation. 
The essay shall be typewritten, should not exceed five thousand 
words, and must be deposited under an assumed name with the 
Registrar before May 1. Accelerating Seniors are eligible for this 
competition and may submit their essays within one year after 
leaving College. 

GRADING OF STUDENTS 

In determining the standing of the student, daily recitations, 
hour examinations, and final examinations are all considered. 
Reports, with numerical grades and averages, are issued at the 
end of each term. 

Freshmen are expected to obtain a general average for the year 
of at least 60 for promotion to the Sophomore class; Sophomores 
are required to obtain a general average for the year of at least 
65 for promotion to the Junior class; Juniors, 70 for promotion to 
the Senior class; and Seniors, 70 for graduation. 

DELINQUENT STUDENTS 

A student who achieves a grade of 50-60 (E) as his term mark 
in any course is allowed a special examination in September fol- 
lowing the failure (on Monday, Tuesday, or Wednesday immedi- 
ately preceding the opening of College). Seniors who achieve 50-60 
in any course (except in the Major Examination, see page 26) are 
permitted to take the special examination during Commencement 
Week. These examinations, known as make-up examinations, are 
scheduled only upon written request by the student and on the 
payment of the fee of $5.00 for each examination. The request and 
the fee must be received by the Registrar ten days before the 
opening of College in September. Late applicants are subject to 
an additional fee of $5.00. During the war special examinations 
for those with a grade of 50-60 may be arranged through the 
Dean and scheduled soon after the condition is registered. A stu- 
dent who achieves a grade below 50 is not permitted to take a 
special examination in that course. 

A student with 50 or below as his term grade, or with 50-60 
as his term grade in any course after the special examination 
privilege has lapsed or after taking a special examination must 



40 Haverford College 

repeat the course if it is a required course (repeated courses take 
precedence in the case of conflict, and are recorded and averaged 
in the year of repetition), or may substitute some other course if 
the failure is an elective course. No course may be repeated more 
than once; failure to pass a repeated required course will conse- 
quently prevent a student from obtaining this degree. 

A fee of $15 per term is charged for all repeated or substituted 
courses. 

No student, after his freshman year, shall be permitted to drop a 
course after the second week of a term, except upon the recom- 
mendation of the Dean and with the approval of the instructor in 
charge. A course, once reported to the College office, shall not be 
removed from the student's record. In the case of failure this shall 
apply, even though the credit deficiency has been made up by tak- 
ing an extra course in a subsequent semester, or applying a credit 
previously obtained. If a student fails a course and wishes to make 
up the credit deficiency by taking an extra course in the subse- 
quent term, the Committee on Student Petitions shall grant him 
this permission only if he first forfeits all right to re-examination in 
his failed course. 

A Sophomore who fails to attain promotion average (see page 
39), and who has not more than two failures, may have the 
privilege of taking re-examinations in the two half-courses in which 
he has received the lowest grades, provided that these grades be 
better than F. A Senior or Junior who fails to attain promotion 
average (see page 39), and who has not more than one failure, 
may take a re-examination in the course of one term in which he 
has received the lowest grade, provided that this grade be better 
than F. 

Any student whose record is such as to justify the belief that 
he is not availing himself of the opportunities offered by Haverford 
College may be dropped. Usually a student who has more than 
two courses of one term each of failures against him at the opening 
of College in September will be dropped. In such cases no refund 
will be made (see page 42). 



FINANCIAL ARRANGEMENTS 

ROOMS 

Entering Freshmen are assigned rooms in the order in which 
their application blanks for admission (see page 22) are received. 
It is, of course, not always possible to meet the desire of Freshmen 
for the cheapest rooms. Twelve of the $100 rooms are regularly- 
reserved for Freshmen. The College assumes that a new student 
will accept any available room of approximately the same price 
as the room for which a preference is expressed. The choice of 
rooms by other students is governed by published rules. 

A deposit of $15 is required of all students, old and new, before 
a room is reserved. In case the student occupies the room, the 
amount will be deducted from his bill for the following year; other- 
wise it will be forfeited, unless the student be excluded by the 
College for failures or other sufficient reason, in which case the fee 
will be refunded upon request. 

Students are expected to treat their own and College property 
with the same consideration as in their own homes. A student is 
held financially responsible for any damage to his room, and any 
damage wilfully done will be sufficient reason for requesting with- 
drawal from the College. 

The College does not hold itself responsible for the safe-keeping 
of private property left by the students in their rooms, or else- 
where on the campus. 

EXPENSES 

The combined charge for tuition ($450), board ($300), and room 
rent ($100 to $225, according to location), varies from $850 to 
$975 for the fall and spring terms. The charge for the summer ses- 
sion is $45 for each term course, $10 a week for board, and $40 to 
$55 for room rent. These charges, which may be altered by the 
Board of Managers if circumstances render such action necessary, 
include heat, electric light, attendance, and the use of necessary 
bedroom furniture, i.e., a chiffonier and a bed, the linen for which 
is furnished and laundered by the College. Students will supply 
their own study furniture, blankets and towels. In general two 
students share one study and each has his private bedroom adjoin- 
ing. A few single rooms are also available. The number of students 
accommodated in the several halls and the combined charges are 
as follows : 

41 



42 Haverford College 

Because of the occupancy of Barclay and Lloyd Halls by the 
Army units resident at Haverford College, only Founders, and 
Merion Halls together with the Language, Government and Sci- 
ence Houses are available as dormitories during the emergency. 

The charge for tuition of day-students is $450 for the fall and 
spring terms and $45 for each term course for the summer. A 
laboratory fee (as specified elsewhere in this catalog) and the cost 
of materials consumed and of apparatus broken are charged in 
each of the laboratories. The fee for dropping a course after two 
weeks is $15. The fee for the Bachelor's degree is $15. For Gradu- 
ate Student fees, see page 31, 

The Board of Managers requires that bills rendered October 1 
for three-fifths of the student's total cash indebtedness for the 
current fall and spring terms for room, board, and tuition must 
be paid in full before November 1. Those rendered February 1 for 
the balance of the fall and spring terms, must be paid in full before 
March 1. Failure to pay within the specified period automatically 
cancels the student's registration. 

No reduction or refund of the tuition charge will be made on 
account of absence, illness or dismissal during the year. If the 
student shall withdraw or be absent from college for any reason, 
there will be no reduction or refund because of failure to occupy 
the room assigned for that semester. In case of illness or absence 
for any other reasons from the college for six weeks or more, there 
will be a proportionate reduction for board provided that notice is 
given to the Comptroller at the time of withdrawal. Fees cannot be 
refunded for any reason whatsoever. 

As an associate to The Tuition Plan the college is able to extend 
to parents or guardians the opportunity of paying tuition and other 
college fees in equal monthly installments during the college year. 
The additional cost is small. Adoption of this plan is optional and 
intended solely as a convenience. Details will be furnished on 
request. 

Additional expenses include text books which need not exceed 
$25-$40 a year and a $10 activities fee which supports the col- 
lege's extracurricular program. A charge of 50 cents per month 
per room will be assessed for the use of radios. 



Scholarships 43 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

Scholarships are of two kinds, competitive, and those awarded 
upon merit and individual need. No one scholarship is given for 
more than one year. 

No scholarship will be given to a student who has a condition. 

No scholarship will be given to a student whose college bill has 
not been paid in full. 

All preliminary correspondence and applications for undergradu- 
ate scholarships for 1944-1945, together with supporting letters 
from parents or guardians should be in the hands of the Dean be- 
fore Tuesday, April the 4th, 1944. 

It is assumed that requests for scholarships will not be made by 
those whose expenses can be met by their parents or from other 
sources. In the majority of cases the College expects work from 
scholarship students in an amount in proportion to the value of 
each scholarship. 

I. Corporation Scholarships. — Sixteen scholarships are awarded 
at the end of each term, without formal application, to the four 
students in each class having the highest average grades for the 
term then closing. In the case of the incoming Freshman Class the 
scholarships will be assigned immediately after the entrance ex- 
aminations (see page 23) to those candidates entering by any plan 
of admission who are judged to be best prepared to do the work of 
the College. Corporation scholarships are in amount of $100.00 for 
the summer term and $150.00 for the fall and spring terms re- 
pectively. 

II. Isaiah V. Williamson Scholarships. — Three scholarships 
normally of $250 each, usually awarded to members of the Senior 
and Junior classes. 

III. Richard T. Jones Scholarship. — One scholarship normally 
of the annual value of $200. 

IV. Edward Yarnall Scholarship. — One scholarship normally of 
the annual value of $200. 

V. Thomas P. Cope Scholarship. — One scholarship normally of 
the annual value of $200. 

VI. Sarah Marshall Scholarship. — One scholarship normally of 
the annual value of $200. 



44 Haverford College 

VII. Mary M. Johnson Scholarship. — One scholarship normally 
of the annual value of $200. 

VIII. Joseph E. Gillingham Scholarships. — Four scholarships 
normally of the annual value of $200 each "for meritorious stu- 
dents." 

IX. Isaac Thome Johnson Scholarship. — One scholarship nor- 
mally of the annual value of $225 available for a student of Wil- 
mington College or a member of Wilmington (Ohio) Yearly Meet- 
ing of Friends. 

X. Jacob P. Jones Scholarships ^ normally amount to $1500 
annually. Usually these will be awarded in sums of $150 each, and 
in return for them certain academic duties may be required of the 
beneficiaries. 

XI. Jacob P. Jones Scholarships. — Eight scholarships normally 
of the annual value of $100 each. 

XII. Caspar Wistar Memorial Scholarship. — A scholarship of 
$250 is usually available, preferably for sons of parents engaged 
in Christian service, including secretaries of Young Men's Chris- 
tian Associations, or students desiring to prepare for similar serv- 
ice in America or other countries. 

XIII. Louis Jaquette Palmer Memorial Scholarship. — This 
Scholarship of $200 is awarded on application, preferably to a 
member of the Freshman Class, who in the opinion of a committee 
representing the donors and the President of the College shall give 
evidence of possessing the qualities of leadership and constructive 
interest in student and community welfare which his friends ob- 
served in Louis Jaquette Palmer of the Class of 1894. 

XIV. /. Kennedy Moorhouse Memorial Scholarship, $300. — 
Intended for the member of the Freshman Class who shall appear 
best fitted to uphold at Haverford the standard of character and 
conduct typified by the late J. Kennedy Moorhouse, of the Class 
of 1900 — "a man modest, loyal, courageous, reverent without 
sanctimony; a lover of hard play and honest work, a leader in clean 
and joyous living." 

XV. Paul W. Newhall Memorial Scholarship. — One scholarship 
normally of the annual value of $200. 

XVI. Robert Martin Zuckert Memorial Scholarships. — Two or 



Fellowships 45 

more scholarships of the annual value of $250, preference to be 
given to "a native of New York or Connecticut and who now 
resides in one of those states." 

XVII. Samuel E. Hilles Memorial Scholarship. — One scholar- 
ship normally of the annual value of $200. 

XVIII. Class of 1913 Scholarship. — One scholarship of the an- 
nual value of about $125. Preference is to be given to sons of mem- 
bers of the Class of 1913 who may apply and who meet the usual 
requirements of the College. 

XIX. Isaac Sharpless Scholarship Fund. — Founded in 1941. 
Scholarships open to graduates of secondary schools and under- 
graduates of Haverford College. Awards based upon fulfil- 
ment by applicant of requirements used in selection of Rhodes 
Scholars to the University of Oxford. Awards granted from list 
submitted to Selection Committee by the Director of Admissions, 
subject always to final approval by the President of the College; 
amount variable. 

XX. Class of 1917 Scholarship. — One scholarship of the annual 
value of about $125. Preference is to be given to sons of members 
of the Class of 1917 who may apply and who meet the usual re- 
quirements of the College. 

XXI. The Geoffrey Silver Memorial Scholarship. — A scholarship 
in the sum of $500 will be available to a Public School graduate 
in this general area who may enter Haverford. 

Most of the scholarships listed above are permanent founda- 
tions. In addition, the New York Alumni maintain a scholarship 
for competition in the New York metropolitan district. The New 
England Alumni maintain one Freshman scholarship of $300 to be 
awarded annually to a New England boy from a New England 
school. 

FELLOWSHIPS 

The Clementine Cope Fellowship, of the annual value of $700, 
may be awarded by the Faculty to the best qualified applicant 
from the Senior Class. He is required to spend the succeeding year 
in study at some American or foreign university approved by the 
Faculty. Applications for the Clementine Cope Fellowship should 
be in the hands of the President of the College before March 1. 

Teaching Fellowships. — With the remaining funds from the 



46 Haverford College 

Clementine Cope Foundation there may be appointed one or more 
graduates of Haverford College as Teaching Fellows, with or 
without specific duties at Haverford College; or a second Cope 
Fellow may be appointed with a stipend of $400 or $500, as the 
income of the Fund may permit. 

Graduate Fellowships. — For information regarding graduate fel- 
lowships, see page 31. 

LOAN FUND 

A loan fund is available for deserving students, other than mem- 
bers of the Freshman Class and transfer students during their first 
year, who may require financial assistance during their college 
course. Federal emergency scholarships for accelerating students 
are also available. 

EMPLOYMENT BUREAU 

There is an Employment Bureau through which students may 
be put in touch with such remunerative employment as may be 
available. 



(T^ 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

THE LIBRARY 

The Haverford College Library building, located near the 
center of the campus, illustrates the steady growth of the college 
in facilities for study and research. The original building, con- 
structed in 1860, now forms the north wing of the Library. To this 
first structure three successive additions have been made. The lat- 
est of these, a commodious Stack and a Treasure Room, was 
dedicated in April 194L The Mary Newlin Smith Memorial 
Garden adjoins the south side of the Library building. 

The Haverford Library collection now contains 160,000 
volumes. Over four hundred literary and scientific periodicals are 
taken. Library endowments provide six thousand dollars yearly 
for the purchase of books. The Library is also a depository of 
government publications. 

With the exception of certain rare books, all volumes in the 
Library are freely accessible to readers. Though designed especially 
for the use of officers and students of the college, the Library af- 
fords to others the privilege of consulting and, under certain re- 
strictions, of withdrawing books. The Library is open on week 
days from 8:00 A.M. to 10:00 p.m., and on Sundays from 1:30 
to 10:00 P.M. Special hours are arranged for vacation periods. 

The Gummere-Morley Memorial Reading Room, decorated and 
equipped by the Class of 1892, provides a special reading and 
browsing room for Haverford students. 

Rare books and special collections are kept in the Treasure 
Room, where both permanent and temporary exhibitions are held. 
The Treasure Room is open from 9 to 5 (Saturdays, 9 to 12). 

Special Collections. The Quaker collection, containing both books 
and manuscripts, is probably the most complete in America. It 
forms a central repository for Friends' literature in this country, 
and makes Haverford a prime source for the study of the Society 
of Friends. The William H. Jenks collection of Friends' tracts, 
mostly of the seventeenth century, numbers about fifteen hundred 
separately bound titles. The Library has recently received a col- 
lection of anti-Quaker tracts. 

The Charles Roberts autograph collection contains more than 
20,000 items, embracing not only autograph letters of authors, 
statesmen, scientists, ecclesiastics, monarchs, and others, but also 
several series of valuable papers on religious and political history. 

47 



48 Haverford College 

The Harris collection of ancient and oriental manuscripts con- 
tains over sixty Hebrew, Greek, Latin, Arabic, Syriac, and 
Ethiopian rolls and codices, collected by J. Rendel Harris. 

Cooperative Services. Haverford maintains a cooperative ar- 
rangement with Bryn Mawr and Swarthmore whereby the facilities 
of the libraries of all three colleges are open to the faculty and 
students of each of the colleges. 

The Philadelphia Bibliographical Center and Union Library 
Catalog, which includes in one alphabetical file a record of all 
books in over one hundred and fifty libraries of the Phialdelphia 
region, enables users of the Haverford Library to locate books in 
the largest cooperative catalog in America. The Haverford Library 
is also a member of The Philadelphia Metropolitan Library Council. 

Library Associates. The newly organized Associates of the 
Haverford Library is an organization of graduates and friends 
of the college, devoted to increasing the usefulness of the Library. 
It serves to bring the facilities of the Library to a wider notice, 
to make these available to the whole Haverford community, to 
encourage the making of gifts to the Library, and to aid in the 
use of the Library for exhibition purposes. Enquiries should be 
addressed to The Librarian, Haverford College. 

ART COLLECTION 

The Haverford Art Collection, including paintings by Pin- 
torrichio. Whistler, Inness, and Sargent, is displayed in the Li- 
brary. 

MUSIC ROOM AND CONCERTS 

The Alfred Percival Smith Room in the Union building now pro- 
vides a music center for the college. It contains a new piano, and 
the Carnegie collection and supplement of recordings. This room 
is used for informal concerts by the Department of Music. The 
phonograph and records may be used by students on Wednesday 
evenings, Saturday afternoons and evenings, and Sunday after- 
noons and evenings. 

The Department of Music offered six public concerts in the sum- 
mer of 1943, and plans at least four such concerts for the academic 
year 1943-1944. These concerts, which present both professional 
artists and organizations, as well as local musicians, are open to 
students and the Haverford community. The Department of 
Music is presenting six informal, invitational concerts in the 
Music Room this season. 



COLLECTION SPEAKERS AND LECTURES 

At its weekly Collection on Tuesday mornings at eleven o'clock, 
the college is addressed by men prominent in civic enterprises, in 
religion, business, government and education. 

Lectures sponsored by departments in the college, especially 
that of government, are offered at various times throughout the 
year. Most of these are open to the public. 

The Haverford Library Lectures, and The Shipley Lectures, both 
endowed lectureships, provide annual speakers. The endowment 
for the former, a gift from the estate of Mary Farnum Brown, 
is available "for an annual course or series of lectures before the 
Senior Class of the College, and other students, on the Bible, its 
history and literature, and as a way may open for it, upon its 
doctrine and its teaching." The fund for the latter was presented 
by Samuel R. Shipley, in memory of his father, Thomas Shipley; 
the income from the Shipley fund is used "for lectures on English 
literature." 

THE BUCKY FOUNDATION 

The Bucky Foundation, which has as its goal the promotion 
of a spiritually grounded political and economic order, and the 
training of responsible citizens for such an order, maintains its 
office in the Haverford Union building. It has sponsored the 
Constructive Citizenship program, in cooperation with Bryn 
Mawr and Swarthmore colleges, which has provided training in the 
U. S. Employment Service for students of Haverford, Bryn Mawr, 
and Swarthmore. This Foundation provided a symposium at 
Haverford in June 1943. The foundation is now encouraging the 
work of Reconstruction and Relief training at Haverford. 

THE MORRIS INFIRMARY 

The Morris Infirmary, presented by John T. Morris, '67, 
contains ten beds, a surgical room, an isolation ward for con- 
tagious diseases, and accommodations for a physician and a nurse. 
Every provision has been made for medical and surgical treat- 
ment of all cases among students during the college year. The 
danger of infection through illness in the college dormitories is 
thus minimized. 

No charge is made for dispensary treatments, for the services of 
the college physician and the nurse, or for residence in the in- 
firmary not exceeding one week in each case of illness. Any addi- 
tional medical or surgical service, including special examinations 

49 



50 Haverford College 

which cannot be made in the infirmary, will be at the expense of 
the student. For residence in the infirmary beyond the limit of one 
week the charge is $3 a day. 

Dr. Herbert W. Taylor is the physician in charge, Miss Mabel 
S. Beard the resident nurse. 

SOCIETIES AND ORGANIZATIONS 

The Students' Association. This organization is composed of all 
undergraduates in good standing at Haverford. It is the body for 
student self-government at Haverford. On its Council are repre- 
sentatives of the four classes, of the student houses, and of publica- 
tions. 

Phi Beta Kappa. The Haverford Chapter of the Phi Beta Kappa 
Society is Zeta of Pennsylvania, chartered in 1898. Elections at 
Haverford are held for students at the end of the junior year and 
at the end of the senior year. 

Founders Club. This Haverford honorary society, established 
in 1914 as an organization of students, alumni, and faculty, seeks 
to recognize by election to its membership those undergraduates 
who combine a sound academic record with noteworthy participa- 
tion in extra-curricular activities. Elections are usually made from 
the junior and senior classes, except in unusual cases where sopho- 
mores are chosen. 

Cap and Bells Club. This is the Haverford dramatic organization. 
Composed of graduates and undergraduates, it sponsors dramatic 
productions at Haverford. In the past few years it has collabo- 
rated with the dramatic clubs of Bryn Mawr and Swarthmore 
in putting on plays and musical productions. 

Nautical Club. This group provides intercollegiate racing and 
general sailing for students who have had some experience and 
new members who desire to learn to sail. The club owns four 
dinghies and has accommodations at the Corinthian Yacht Club 
on the Delaware river. Several intercollegiate meets are held each 
semester; occasional meets are held at Annapolis, Boston, and the 
Coast Guard Academy in New London. 

Radio Club. A campus broadcasting station is operated by this 
group. Programs are prepared and presented by the club through- 
out the year. 

Campus Club. A group of alumni and friends of the college 
who are interested in preserving and improving the natural beauty 
of the campus is organized as The Campus Club. The planning is 
done by an executive committee which meets biannually for the 



Publications 51 

purpose of laying out new projects. The Arboretum and Woolman 
Walk were developed and are maintained by The Campus Club. 
Other Organizations. The following groups are also active at 
Haverford: Glee Club, Varsity Club, Debate Council, Biology 
Club, Chemistry Club, Classical Symposium, Engineering Club, 
International Relations Club, Mathematics-Physics Club. 

PUBLICATIONS 

Official Publications. The college publishes annually the Haver- 
ford College Catalog, the President's Report, the Treasurer's Re- 
port, the Report of the Librarian and publications of the faculty, 
and the College Directory. 

The Haverford Review, published two to three times annually, 
is an illustrated, graduate magazine, devoted to the interests of 
the entire Haverford community. It provides a forum for the dis- 
cussion of the problems and functions of the small liberal arts 
college in America. Annual subscription $L Enquiries should be 
addressed to The Managing Editor, The Haverford Review, Haver- 
ford College. 

The Haverford News, a student publication, appears weekly 
during the college year. Each issue contains a section of Alumni 
news. The Stack is a student literary magazine. The Record, senior 
yearbook, is distributed immediately before commencement. 




SPECIAL PLANS OF STUDY IN PREPARATION 
FOR PROFESSIONS 

A large and increasing number of Haverford College students 
desire on graduation to enter upon courses of study fitting them 
for professions. For students desiring intensive preliminary train- 
ing in engineering, medicine, and other highly specialized subjects, 
the College offers combinations of courses which admit to the best 
professional schools in the country with full standing, and in many 
cases with advanced credit. 

To illustrate this feature of the curriculum there are presented 
on the following pages sample outlines of study for the four years, 
preparatory to specialization in Engineering, Medicine, Law, and 
Business Administration. Similar outlines might be prepared for 
other professions — Teaching, the Ministry, Journalism, Industrial 
Chemistry, etc. The student will in all cases consult with the Dean 
and the professors concerned in his choice of courses. 

N.B. — It is to be understood that each of the outlines J ollowing is a 
sample only, presenting one among many possibilities, and is not 
intended to be a prescribed program. 

Preparation for Engineering. — Engineering today covers an ex- 
tremely broad field of service, and there is accordingly no standard 
type of training suitable for all students preparing themselves for 
an engineering career. A typical four year course in general engi- 
neering follows : 

Freshman Year Sophomore Year 

Principles of Engineering Drawing and Kinematics of Machines 

Shop Methods Analytical Mechanics 

Engineering Orientation and Surveying General Physics 
Inorganic Chemistry and Qualitative Calculus 

Analysis Elementary Economics 

Mathematics 

English Composition and Literature 
Foreign Language 

Junior Year Senior Year 

Elements of Applied Electricity Heat Engineering 

Alternating Currents Strength of Materials 

Thermodynamics Machine Design 

Fluid Mechanics Special Project in Engineering 

Materials of Engineering Internal Combustion Engines 

Advanced Calculus and Differential Accounting (or Statistics) 

equations. English Elective 

Government and Business The Corporation 

Introduction to Sociology Labor Policies and Business Manage- 

Industry and Society ment 

Seminar in Engineering Seminar in Engineering 

Preparation for Medicine. In consequence of the relatively large 
number of students preparing for a career in medicine the pre- 

52 



Preparation for Professions 53 

medical course has become a distinctive feature of the work of the 
College. The course is under the direction of the Premedical Com- 
mittee of the Faculty (see p. 21), the members of which stand ready 
to advise students on matters of premedical interest. The program 
of studies includes, in addition to the course in Freshman English 
and the limited electives required for graduation, the courses in the 
premedical sciences, biology, chemistry, and physics, which meet 
the requirements for admission to medical school and of the State 
and National licensing boards. Apart from these requirements a 
sufficient number of electives remain available to enable the stu- 
dent to obtain a well balanced education. 

A premedical student will ordinarily major in a science subject 
but his choice is not restricted, since he can complete the require- 
ments of almost any Major and at the same time meet the medical 
school requirements for admission. However, he must do better 
than average work in the premedical sciences in order to qualify 
for a favorable recommendation by the Premedical Committee. 
A special Premedical Major is in process of formation. 

In the typical premedical program given below, the courses 
required or specifically advised by most medical schools are 
starred. The "electives" must be so chosen as to satisfy the college 
requirements with regard to limited electives and concentration in 
a Major field of study and also to meet any special requirements 
of the medical school to which application is to be made. In general 
in order to avoid conflicts between necessary courses and to avoid 
overloading with laboratory work in the Junior and Senior years, 
the science courses should be taken in the order and in the years 
indicated. 

First Year Second Year 

English Composition and Literature* English Literature* 

Inorganic Chemistry* Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis* 

General Zoology* General Physics* 

Elementary German (or French)* Intermediate German (or French)* 

Freshman Mathematics* Elective 

Junior Year Senior Year 

Organic Chemistry* Physical Chemistry* 

Vertebrate Morphology* Advanced Biology 

Psychology (one term)* Advanced Organic Chemistry* 

Sociology (one term)* Electives 
Electives 

Preparation for the Law. — Even those law schools which require 
that a person must hold a college degree to be eligible for admis- 
sion do not usually specify what studies he shall have pursued in 
his undergraduate course. It is obvious, however, that a choice of 
electives may be made which will be of great value to the student 



54 Haverford College 

later in the study of law and in the practice of his profession. It is 
recommended that the following courses be included in a student's 
program. In the case of those advanced courses which are given 
only in alternate years some variation in this program may be 
necessary. 

Freshman Year Sophomore Year 

English Composition and Literature English History 

Foreign Language, preferably Latin Elementary Economics 

A Modern Foreign Language Contemporary Legislation 

Mathematics American, Mediaeval, or Modern Euro- 

American Federal Government pean History 

State and Local Government 

Junior Year Senior Year 

Elementary Psychology English Literature 

English Constitutional History American, Mediaeval, or Modern Euro- 
Roman Law pean History 

Government and Business The Corporation 

Constitutional Law Government Finance 

Accounting Money and Bankng 

Preparation for Business Administration. — Students planning to 
continue study at a graduate school of business administration 
or to engage directly in business should arrange their programs 
for their Freshman and Sophomore years as above suggested for 
those planning to study law, but for their Junior and Senior years 
the following courses are recommended. 

Junior Year Senior Year 

Industry and Society Ethics 

Labor Organization and Business National Income and Investment 

Management International Trade and Finance 

Money and Banking Government and Business 

Accounting 

Introduction to Statistics 
The Corporation 

Students expecting to enter manufacturing industries in any 
capacity are encouraged to take courses in Chemistry, Engineer- 
ing, or Physics in order to become acquainted with the general 
nature of the processes and techniques involved in modern manu- 
facturing. 

Preparation for Public Administration. — Students who are in- 
terested in entering the government service for work in Public 
Administration should have courses in Elementary Economics, 
American Federal Government, National Income and Investment, 
Government Finance, Accounting, Statistics, Public Administra- 
tion, Constitutional Law, and Government and Business. 

Each year the United States Government holds an examination 
for filling vacancies in the field of Public Administration, which is 
covered by these courses given by the College. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

The normal course at Haverford College is three hours per week. 
The laboratory equivalent for a lecture hour is customarily two 
and one half hours. Exceptions to this general rule are noted, when 
necessary, in the listing of the particular course. 

ART 

Given by the History of Art Department 
AT Bryn Mawr College 

The instruction in Art has a twofold objective. On the one hand, 
the students' appreciation is furthered by close aesthetic analysis 
of works of art. On the other hand, the history of art is treated as a 
branch of the humanistic studies and attention is given to the 
development of Art in itself as well as to its contacts with other 
human interests. 

At Haverford the Carnegie set of reproductions and at Bryn 
Mawr a large collection of photographs are available as additional 
illustrative material. 

All lectures are illustrated by lantern slides. 

Major Requirements 

The undergraduate instruction offered in this department includes three units 
of undergraduate first and second year work and two and one-half units of ad- 
vanced undergraduate and free elective courses. Students majoring in the history 
of art will be required to concentrate in either the field of Mediaeval Art, Renais- 
sance Art or Modern Art. For details of the comprehensive examination see the 
Bryn Mawr College Calendar. 

Special work is offered to students recommended by the department for honors 
in history of art, in either Mediaeval Art, Renaissance Art or Modern Art. It in- 
volves a scheme of reading and individual conferences and includes the preparation 
of reports and special examinations. 

1. An Introduction to the History of Art. Mr. Bernheimer, assisted by Miss 

Wade. 

This course is designed to give the student an understanding of art in its philo- 
sophic, technical, social and historical aspects, thereby laying a basis for more 
advanced work in the department. The discussion of general problems will be 
followed by an analysis of the different periods of art, of the interests that pre- 
vailed during them, and of the formal expression given to such interests. At cer- 
tain points in the course the lectures will be given by guest lecturers from other 
departments. 

2. Italian Art. Miss Jenkins. 

The development of the major arts in Italy is traced from the beginnings of the 
Renaissance in the thirteenth century to the Rococo style of the eighteenth. 
Architecture and sculpture are considered independently as well as in relation 
to the stylistic evolution of painting. 

55 



56 Haverford College 

3. History of European Painting after 1550. Miss Jenkins, Mr. Bernheimer. 

The evolution of painting outside Italy from the middle of the sixteenth century 
to the French Revolution is traced in the first semester, followed in the second 
by a consideration of the art movements of the nineteenth and twentieth cen- 
turies. 

4. Romanesque and Gothic Art and Architecture. Mr. Bernheimer, Miss 
Jenkins. 

An understanding of Christian mediaeval art is sought through its roots in 
religion, philosophy and social conditions. Emphasis is laid on the great cathe- 
drals, studied in their liturgical, iconographic and artistic aspects; while the general 
development of the Romanesque and Gothic styles is traced from the eleventh 
to the fifteenth century. 

Sa. Post-Renaissance and Modem Architecture in Europe and America. 

Miss Jenkins. 

A discussion of the varying forms taken by the Renaissance style in combina- 
tion with the different national building traditions of Europe and the rise of 
eclecticism in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries will be followed by an 
analysis of the advance of structural technique with the machine age and the at- 
tempt to formulate an architecture suited to the modern world. 

6b. Early Mediaeval Art. Mr. Bernheimer. 

The formation of Christian art from the pagan traditions of the antique world, 
and its subsequent development in the eastern Mediterranean and the Latin 
West will be traced to the beginning of the Romanesque era in the eleventh cen- 
tury. The arts discussed will include architecture, sculpture, painting, mosaic, 
illumination and ivory carving. 

7b. The Art of the Northern Renaissance. Mr. Bernheimer. 

The course covers the development of representative art in the Netherlands, 
France, Germany, Spain and England from the later fourteenth century to the 
later sixteenth. Special emphasis is laid upon the International Style, the reawaken- 
ing of a sense of nature in Flemish painting, and upon the art of Diirer and his 
contemporaries. The technique and development of the graphic arts are also 
explained. 

[Not to be offered in 1943^14.] 

ASTRONOMY 

The William J. Strawbridge Memorial Observatory affords stu- 
dents the means of becoming familiar with a variety of astro- 
nomical instruments, and of acquiring from actual observation a 
practical acquaintance with astronomy. 

The equipment consists of three equatorially mounted tele- 
scopes, a 10 inch and a 4^ inch refractor and a 6 inch reflector; 
a reflecting telescope with 8-inch mirror and altazimuth mounting; 
a meridian circle telescope of 3f-inch aperture; a zenith telescope of 
2j-inch aperture; a spectrohelioscope ; an astrographic mounting 
provided with two 4-inch Ross lenses and a 4-inch guiding tele- 
scope; two sidereal clocks; a chronograph by Bond; and other in- 
struments. The astronomical library is housed in the Observatory. 

Major Requirements 

Either Astronomy la and 2b or Astronomy 3, and four one term courses to be 



Biblical Literature 57 

chosen from Astronomy 5a, 6b; 7a, 8b; 9a, 10b. Three courses to be chosen from 
Mathematics 2, 3 and Physics 2, 3. 

A comprehensive examination, partly oral, based on the subject matter of the 
above-named courses. 

la. Descriptive Astronomy. — Mr. Green. 

A culture class open to all students. 

The leading facts of astronomy, with elementary explanation of the methods 
and instruments by which they are ascertained. A portion of the time is devoted 
to the study of the constellations, the handling of the telescopes, and simple 
problems. No fee. 

2b. Celestial Navigation.— Mr. Green and Mr. Macintosh. 

The determination of position and course at sea and in the air by trigonometric, 
graphical, and tabular methods. Mathematical aspects of piloting, such as the 
problems of interception and of return to a moving base, will be emphasized. 
Sextant observations will be taken and reduced. Prerequisite, Plane Trigonometry. 
A fee of $7.00 per semester is charged. 

3. Descriptive and Practical Astronomy. — Mr. Gummere. 

This course covers the same ground as Astronomy la, together with practical 
work in the Observatory. 

Use of sextant, transit, and equatorial; determination of instrumental con- 
stants, latitude, and time. The course is opened with a brief review of the essentials 
of spherical trigonometry. Prerequisite, Plane Trigonometry. A fee of $4.00 per 
semester is charged. 

5a, 6b. Observational Astronomy. — Mr. Green. 

The subject matter will be chosen to meet the needs of the students. Pre- 
requisite, Astronomy 3. A fee of $7.50 per semester is charged. 

7a, 8b. Celestial Mechanics and Orbit Determination. — Mr. Gummere, 

An introduction to mathematical astronomy. Prerequisite, Mathematics 3, or 
in conjunction with Mathematics 3. No fee. 

9a, 10b. Astrophysics. — Mr. Green. 

A study of the state of matter in interstellar space, in the atmospheres of the 
stars and in their interiors. Prerequisites, Physics 2 and Mathematics 2. No fee. 

BIBLICAL LITERATURE 

The courses in this department are designed to cover broadly 
the history, literature and religion of the Bible with their back- 
grounds in the culture in which they developed and to which they 
contributed. Additional courses are offered in the ancient history 
of the Near East, the Hebrew language, and comparative religion. 
Sufficient scope is thus provided to meet the varied interests of stu- 
dents electing courses in the department and to offer either intro- 
ductory or advanced work. 

A gift enabled the late Professor Grant to make a series of five 
field excavations at a site in Palestine, the archaeological yields of 
which are exhibited in the Beth Shemesh Museum, third floor of 



58 Haverford College 

Sharpless Hall. These materials reveal the life of a typical Near 
East community in the many aspects of its development and inter- 
play with other peoples over a span of 2000 years. Thus the collec- 
tions provide a laboratory for study of the cultural cross-currents 
which met in Palestine during one of the great formative periods of 
civilization. 

Major Requirements 

Six half-year courses in Biblical Literature. 

Six other half-year courses in either Biblical Literature or related departments. 

Special study of one selected Biblical field, e.g., history, literature, the Old or 
New Testament. 

A comprehensive examination covering the history, literature, and criticism of 
the Bible; and the religious and moral life of the Hebrews, Jews, and Christians. 

la. Introduction to the Old and New Testaments. — 

The literature of the Bible with its historical background. 

2b. The Rise of Christianity. — Mr. Flight. 

A study of the background, early development and spread of the Christian 
movement as reflected in the New Testament, particularly in the book of Acts 
and the letters of Paul, and to the third century. 

[Not to be offered in 1944-45.] 

4b. Development of Christian Thought within the Bible. — Mr. Flight. 

A study of the origins and development of the basic ideas in the teaching of 
religious leaders from the prophets to Paul. 
[Not offered in 1943-44.] 

5a. Ancient History of the Near East. — Mr. Flight. 

The Beginnings of Western Civilization in the Cultures of the Near East; 
Archaeological and Historical. 
(Also called History 8a.) 

6b. Comparative Religion. — Mr. Flight. 

A comparative study of the great living religions, their founders, their scrip- 
tures, their characteristic ideas and ideals. 

8b. The English Bible.—MR. Flight. 

History and literary art of the English Bible, particularly the King James 
version and its influence on general literature. 
(Also called English 8b.) 
[Not to be offered in 1943-44.] 

9a or 10b. Biblical and Oriental Conference. — Mr. Flight. 

Individual work to be elected by the student from one or more of the following 
divisions of the field: literature, archaeology, history, philosophy. Prerequisite, 
other work in the department, in which a grade of B has been attained. 

11. Hebrew. — Mr. Flight. 

Grammar, composition, and reading of simple Old Testament prose. 
[Not offered in 1943-44.] 

BIOLOGY 

The Department of Biology offers courses for students who wish 
to enter medical school, for students who wish to continue bio- 



Biology 59 

logical studies after graduation in graduate school, teaching, or 
conservation, and for students who wish a general knowledge of 
plants and animals. 

Most medical schools require General Zoology for admission. 
Vertebrate Morphology is required by some and advised by others. 
General Botany is required by a few. Most graduate schools re- 
quire, as a prerequisite for work in Biology, a reading knowledge of 
French and German, Chemistry 2, Physics 1 or 2 (or Geology 1, 
depending on the student's field of interest), and at least Biology 
1 and 2. For advanced experimental Biology, Chemistry 4 may be 
necessary. 

A gift from the class of 1915 enables the department to house 
and display the extensive collections of the college so that they are 
available to anyone interested in the natural history of the Phila- 
delphia area. 

Major Requirements 

Biology 1, 2a, 7, 8b and one of 3, 4, and 5. 

Two courses chosen from Physics 1, 1-2, or 2, Chemistry 2, Math., 13a, and 
Geology 1. 

Reading and reporting on approximately 15 biological books, besides those read 
in connection with courses. This is to be done at any time between the end of 
sophomore year and date of the comprehensive examination. 

A comprehensive examination on the courses taken and the reading done is 
required to be passed. This examination will be partly written (approximately 4 
hours), and partly oral. 

1. Genera] Zoology. — Four hours. Mr. Henry and Mr. Evans. 

The lectures of this course include a survey of the structure and relationships 
of animals, of the fundamental principles of living organisms, and an outline of 
the more important questions relating to evolution, heredity, and distribution. 
The laboratory periods are devoted to obtaining an acquaintance with the more 
important types of animal life. Two lectures and two laboratory periods a week. 
A fee of $8.00 per semester is charged. 

2a. General Botany. — Four hours. Mr. Henry. 

The fundamental principles of Botany and the application of plant science to 
human welfare are discussed in the lectures. The laboratory work consists of a 
study of the morphology, physiology, and life history of representatives of the 
principal groups of plants. This is a brief course designed to fit the needs of the 
student not majoring in science. A fee of $7.50 per semester is charged. 

3. Vertebrate Morphology. — Mr. Henry, Mr. Evans. 

The laboratory work of this course includes the dissection of the principal 
types of vertebrates. The lectures deal with the origin, status, and evolution of 
the organ systems of vertebrates. One lecture and two laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisite, Biology 1. A fee of $9.00 per semester is charged. 

4. Local Flora. — Mr. Henry. 

The work of this course consists of the identification of representative Anglo- 
sperms, together with the study of their taxonomy and distribution. Collecting in 
the field will supplement laboratory work. One lecture and two laboratory periods 
a week. Prerequisite, Biology 2a and 8b. A fee of $7.50 per semester is charged. 

[Not offered in 1943-44.] 



60 Haverford College 

5. Entomology. — Mr. Henry. 

This course has been designed to give the student a knowledge of the anatomy 
and physiology of insects. The laboratory work consists of the dissection of a rep- 
resentative of each of the larger Orders. Particular emphasis is placed on the struc- 
tures used in identification and permanent mounts are made of many of them. 
The preparation of local collections is required as part of the work. One lecture and 
two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Biology 1. A fee of $7.50 per semester 
is charged. 

7. Evolution, Heredity, and Other General Biological Problems. — Mr. Dunn. 

This is a general cultural course, intended not only for students of Biology, 
but for all who wish to be informed on current biological matters, especially stu- 
dents of Sociology, Philosophy and History, and of other Sciences. Special 
emphasis is given to the modern theories of evolution and of heredity. Open, with- 
out prerequisite, to Juniors and Seniors. A fee of $7.50 per semester is charged. 

[Not offered in 1943^4.] 

8b. Systematic Botany. — Mr. Henry. 

This course, a continuation of Biology 2a consists of a systematic study of the 
major plant groups. Prerequisite, Biology 2a. A fee of $7.50 is charged. 

10. Seminar Courses. — Required of candidates for Honors in Biology. 

Open only by permission of the Instructor. 

Vertebrate Zoology — Classification and evolution of vertebrate groups. Pre- 
requisite, Biology 1, Biology 3 or with Biology 3. Mr. Dunn. 

Advanced Morphology — Study of morphological problems in animals. Pre- 
requisite, Biology 3. Mr. Dunn. 

Ecology and Distribution — Problems of habitat relationships or geographical 
relationship of plants and/or animals. Prerequisite, Biology 1 or Biology 2a and 
8b. Mr. Dunn, Mr. Henry and Mr. Evans. 

Genetics — Problems of Genetics. Primarily for Graduate Students. Mr. Dunn 

Advanced Botany — Studies in comparative anatomy of plants. Prerequisite, 

Biology 2a, 4, 8b. Mr. Henry. No fixed fee. 

CHEMISTRY 

The courses required for the Chemistry Major are designed to 
give the student a comprehensive knowledge of the fundamentals 
of chemistry which will qualify him for entrance to medical school 
or for non-professional chemical work. A student who plans to enter 
medical school should take, regardless of the department in which 
he majors, Chemistry 1 (or its equivalent), 2, 3, 4, and 5. 

Haverford College has been placed by the American Chemical 
Society on the approved list of institutions for the training of pro- 
fessional chemists. For a departmental recommendation for gradu- 
ate work in chemistry, or a position as professional chemist, a stu- 
dent must complete the following courses in chemistry and other 
subjects: Chemistry 1 (or its equivalent) 2, 3, 4, 5, 11a or 126, 13a, 
146, 15a, and an additional half-year course in chemistry; Mathe- 
matics 2; Physics 2; German 2. 



Chemistry 61 

Major Requirements 

Chemistry 1 (or its equivalent), 2, 3, 4, 5 and an additional half-year course in 
chemistry, and two courses in related departments. The major examination will 
cover the chemistry courses listed above. 

Seniors majoring in the department will meet during the second half-year with 
members of the staff for a critical discussion of the chemical principles studied in 
the courses and of the applications of these principles. 

Candidates for final honors in chemistry are required to take during the Junior 
and Senior years at least four of the short courses offered by the Department 
such as: Chemical German reading, history of chemistry, glassblowing, chemical 
industry, physiological chemistry, the chemistry of the rarer metals, and special 
topics in inorganic chemistry. 

1. Introductory General Chemistry. — Mr. Meldrum. 

Primarily for Freshmen and Sophomores who have not had chemistry in pre- 
paratory school. Additional reading required of Juniors and Seniors. 

Lectures and laboratory work dealing with the preparation, properties, and 
uses of the more common elements and their compounds; fundamental laws and 
theories; and the general principles of chemistry applied to industrial processes. 
A fee of $5.00 per semester is charged. 

2. Theoretical Inorganic Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis. — Four hours. Mr* 
Meldrum and Mr. Elkinton. 

Primarily for Freshmen and Sophomores who have had chemistry in prepara- 
tory school or who have passed Chemistry 1. Fundamental laws and theories. 
Reaction velocity and equilibrium. Theories of ionization and atomic structure 
applied to explain solution and electrolytic phenomena and the mechanism of 
chemical reactions. Qualitative analysis using semimicro methods constitutes the 
laboratory work. A fee of $6.00 per semester is charged. 

3. Quantitative Analysis. — Four hours. Mr. Meldrum. 

Lectures on the general principles of gravimetric, volumetric, electrolytic, and 
other methods of analysis. In the laboratory, typical methods are applied. Pre- 
requisite, Chemistry 2 and Mathematics 1. A fee of $6.00 per semester is charged. 

4. Organic Chemistry. — Four hours. Mr. Jones. 

A study of aliphatic, aromatic, and heterocyclic compounds. Prerequisite, 
Chemistry 2. A fee of $6.00 per semester is charged. 

5. Physical Chemistry. — Mr. Jones. 

A systematic study of the principles of physical chemistry, including the ideal 
gas, real gases, liquids, solids, solutions, electrical conductivity, electromotive 
force, hydrogen ion concentration, reaction velocity, homogeneous and hetero- 
geneous equilibria, adsorption, catalysis and colloids. Prerequisite, Chemistry 3. 
Laboratory work required in the case of those who plan to be A. C. S. chemists 
only. A fee of $6.00 per semester is charged those taking the course who wish 
laboratory work. 

11a. Chemical Thermodynamics. — Mr. Cadbury. 

A detailed study of the first and second laws of thermodynamics and their 
consequences; the application of these laws to chemical systems. The develop- 
ment and use of the third law. Prerequisite, Chemistry 2, Mathematics 2 and either 
Chemistry 5 or Physics 2. No fee. 

12b. Advanced Physical Chemistry. — Mr. Cadbury. 

Dipole moments, the parachor and spectra. Modern theories of solutions. Re- 
action kinetics. Photochemistry. Prerequisite, Chemistry 5, and Mathematics 2. 
No fee. 



62 Haverford College 

13a. Advanced Organic Chemistry and Qualitative Organic Analysis. — Mr. 
Jones. 

A study of stereochemistry, carbohydrates, proteins, amino acids, and special 
reactions. The identification of organic substances by classification reactions and 
by the preparation of derivatives constitutes the laboratory work. Prerequisite, 
Chemistry 4. A fee of $6.00 per semester is charged. 

14b. Organic Syntheses. — Mr. Jones. 

A study of organo-metallic compounds, rearrangements, unsaturated systems, 
and special preparative reactions of organic chemistry. Prerequisite, Chemistry 4. 
A fee of $7.50 per semester is charged. 

15a. Advanced Quantitative Analysis. — Mr. Meldrum. 

A systematic study of methods for the quantitative determination of the ele- 
ments. The laboratory work includes the Carius method for halogen, the deter- 
mination of carbon and hydrogen by combustion, the analysis of fuel gas, and elec- 
trolytic analysis. Prerequisite, Chemistry 3. A fee of $6.00 per semester is charged. 

17a, 18b. Chemistry Research. — Mr. Meldrum, Mr. Cadbury, and Mr. 
Jones. 

Open only to Senior chemistry majors and graduate students in chemistry. May 
be elected as one or more courses. No fixed fee. 

21a, 22b. Special Topics in Theoretical Chemistry. — Mr. Meldrum. No fee. 

Open only to graduate students. 

Chemistry la, 2a, 3a, 4a, lie, 126, 13a, and 17c were given in the summer of 
1943. 

ECONOMICS 

The instruction in Economics is intended primarily to give 
students an understanding of the working of modern economic 
society. The advanced courses are designed to give a liberal educa- 
tion and to arouse an informed interest in public affairs, as well as 
to meet the needs of men going into business or finance, or going on 
to graduate work in economics or business administration. Several 
of the advanced courses are designed to be of special value to men 
planning to enter the foreign service or other fields of government 
work, or going into journalism or law. A number of the courses 
acquaint the student with source material in the college library 
and elsewhere, and with research methods in economics, and give 
practice in the preparation of analyses and reports. 

Men majoring in Economics should take supporting work in the 
fields of Government, History, and Sociology, and are encouraged 
to take Introduction to Statistics, offered by the Department of 
Mathematics. Mathematics i is a prerequisite to Statistics. 

Economics 1 is elective for Sophomores and is a prerequisite 
to all other courses in Economics. It may be taken by Freshmen 
with the permission of the Dean, and by Juniors and Seniors with 
the permission of the professor in charge. 



Economics 63 

Major Requirements 

Economics 1, 3a, 9a, 13a, and three other half-year courses in Economics. 
Mathematics 13b (Introduction to Statistics) may be considered as one such half- 
year course. 

Sociology la, and three other half-year courses in supporting fields, as approved 
by the professors concerned. 

Selected readings on the history of economic thought and on current economic 
problems. 

A seven-hour comprehensive examination covering a review of the major 
courses and the readings. A part of the comprehensive examination may be oral. 

1. Elementary Economics. — Mr. Teaf. 

The purpose of this course is to acquaint the student with the main features 
of modern economic life, and to develop an understanding of the principles under- 
lying economic relationships. Emphasis is laid on the application of these prin- 
ciples to present day problems. 

3a. Money and Banking. — Mr. Hubbard. (At Bryn Mawr College.) 

A study of the history and principles of money, credit, and banking, with par- 
ticular reference to American conditions. Such problems as monetary standards, 
price movements and their effects, foreign exchange, commercial banking, and 
central banking and the Federal Reserve System are considered. 

4b. International Trade and Finance. — Mr. Fetter. 

A study of foreign trade and exchange, international payments and trade 
problems connected therewith, money and banking in their international aspects, 
and international indebtedness. 

[Not offered in 1943-44.] 

5a. Industry and Society. — Mr. Watson. 

See Sociology 5a. 

6b. Labor Policies and Business Management. — Mr. Pancoast. 

See Sociology 6b. 

8b. Government Finance. — Mr. Herndon. 

See Government 8b. 

9a. Accoimting. — Mr. Teaf. 

The balance sheet and statement of profit and loss, the classification of accounts, 
the theory of debit and credit, the books of original entry and of record, opening 
and closing the books, corporation accounts, reserves, etc. Discussion is accom- 
panied by practice problems. This course is intended to provide an understanding 
of accounting sufficient for students going into the professions as well as a founda- 
tion for advanced accounting courses for those who will go into business. 

10b. The Corporation. — Mr. Teaf. 

Economic functions and legal responsibilities of the corporation and its mem- 
bers; fixed capital, and the analysis of financial statements; policies involving 
surplus, reserves, dividends, etc.; expansion, combination, and reorganization. 
Social problems created by the growth of corporations are given special attention. 
Prerequisite, Economics 9a. 

11a. Government and Business. — Mr. Teaf. 

A study of the historical development, economic basis, and the present problems 
of the regulation of business organization and policies by government. Special 
attention is given to such topics as the trust movement, anti-trust legislation, 
the Federal Trade Commission, competitive practices, cartels and trade associ- 
ations 

Also called Government 11a. 



64 Haverford College 

13a. National Income and Investment.— Mr. Fetter. 

A study of the meaning of national income and the methods of measuring it; 
its distribution in the United States; the economic effects of the allocation of 
national income as between consumption, investment, and hoarding; the signifi- 
cance of investment in the modern economy; the effects of governmental policy 
upon income distribution. 

Enrollment limited. A seminar course intended primarily for economics majors, 
but also open to qualified students from other departments. 

[Not offered in 1943-^4.] 

14b. Seminar in Economic Problems. — Mr. Fetter. 

This seminar will deal with an economic problem of current importance, with 
emphasis on the relation between economic analysis and the formulation of public 
policy. 

The subject of the course may shift from year to year, or the same topic may 
be continued for several years, depending on developments in world economic 
affairs. In case of a shift in the subject matter of the course, it may be repeated 
for credit. 

In 1942-43 the course will deal with selected economic problems of Latin 
America, including raw materials, industrialization, monetary stabilization, inter- 
national indebtedness and commercial policy. As a background for the economic 
problems, the course will include a brief survey of the history and political or- 
ganization of Latin America, Enrollment limited. 

[Not offered in 1943-44.] 

15a, 16b. Seminar. — Hours to be arranged. Mr. Fetter and Mr. Teaf. 

Readings, reports, and conferences on selected topics, to meet the individual 
needs of graduate students. Advanced undergraduate students may enroll for 
this course after specific arrangement with the chairman of the department. 

Economics 17a. Readings in Foreign Economics. Mr. Fetter. 

This course is to train men in the reading of economic literature in foreign 
languages, and to familiarize them with current economic publications and with 
the principal economic journals and sources of commercial and statistical in- 
formation appearing in foreign languages. Intended primarily for economics majors, 
but qualified men in other fields will be admitted. 

The course will be given as demand warrants, with reading in French, German, 
or Spanish to meet the needs of individual students. Men admitted to the course 
ordinarily must have the equivalent of two years of college study in the language 
to be covered, but by special permission a man with only one year may be ad- 
mitted. 

[Not offered in 1943-44.] 

Economics 9a was offered in the summer of 1943. 

ENGINEERING 

The engineering courses are designed to give a thorough train- 
ing in fundamental engineering principles and, as far as practicable, 
to illustrate the application of these principles to their associ- 
ated industries. 

Students not intending to enter the highly specialized fields of 
design and research will find the Haverford courses ample for their 
needs. Graduates of Haverford who have majored in engineering 
are admitted to the student-engineers' courses of the leading in- 
dustrial companies on equal terms with graduates of the larger 



Engineering 65 

engineering colleges. Those who desire more specialized training 
before entering the active work of the profession are granted sub- 
stantial credit toward advanced standing in technical institutions 
or are admitted to their graduate schools. 

The engineering courses are conducted in the Hilles Laboratory 
of Applied Science, a modern building containing offices, class- 
rooms, drawing rooms, a departmental library, mechanical and 
electrical laboratories, locker rooms, etc. 

Exceptional facilities for observing the practical side of the work 
are offered by the many manufacturing companies in and near 
Philadelphia, and frequent inspection trips are made. 

A typical selection of courses for those majoring in engineering 
is outlined on page 52. 

The specific courses oflfered by the department are described 
below; but, in addition, others may be arranged to cover special 
needs. Application for admission to such courses should be made 
to the professor in charge. Engineering 13a, 14b and 23a, 24b may 
be counted as courses in Physics for the purpose of satisfying any 
curriculum requirements. 

Major Requirements 

Engineering la, 2b, 7a, 8b, 13a, 14b, ISa, 16b 

Chemistry 1 or its equivalent, Mathematics 2, Physics 2 and two additional 
half year courses from Engineering, Mathematics, Physics or Chemistry. 
An active interest in current professional work. 
Engineering seminar and comprehensive examination. 

la. Principles of Engineering Drawing and Shop Methods. — Mr. Hetzel, 
Mr. Holmes and Mr. Rantz. 

Lettering, conventions, projection, perspective, sketching, detail and assembly 
drawings, checking, and blue printing. Text: French, Engineering Drawing, and 
French and McCully, Engineering Drawing Sheets. Woodworking, pattern and 
foundry work in shop. Inspection trips. A fee of $7.50 per semester is charged. 

2b. Engineering Orientation, Surveying and Shop Methods. — Mr. Ritten- 
HousE, Mr. Holmes, Mr. Hetzel and Mr. Rantz. 

The purpose of this course is to inform students as to the nature and scope of 
various fields of engineering and to acquaint them with typical engineering equip- 
ment and problems. Exercises in machine-tool work, in plane surveying and in 
the mechanical and electrical laboratories. Discussions and reports. Inspection 
trips. A fee of $7.50 per semester is charged. 

3a or 4b. Descriptive Geometry. — Mr. Holmes. 

Advanced orthographic projections; applications to engineering structures. 
Theory and plates. A fee of $5.00 per semester is charged. 
[Not offered in 1943-44.] 

5a. Shop Methods. — Mr. Rantz. 

Machine-tool work on the lathe, planer, milling machine, shaper, etc. Reference 
reading and reports on modern production methods, costs and time studies. A fee 
of $7.50 per semester is charged. 



66 Haverford College 

7a. Kinematics of Machines. — Mr. Hetzel. 

Velocity and acceleration analysis of mechanisms; cams, belts and chains, 
gears, etc. Occasional inspection trips. Text: Keown and Faires, Mechanism, and 
Headley, Problems in Kinematics. A fee of $5.00 per semester is charged. 

8b. Analytical Mechanics. — Mr. Hetzel. 

A study of forces and moments of forces; determination of forces in trusses 
and cranes; centroids and center of gravity; rectilinear and curvilinear motion; 
translation and rotation of bodies; work, power, and energy; impulse and momen- 
tum; balancing and moments of inertia. Prerequisite or parallel course. Mathe- 
matics 2. No fee. 

10b. Materials of Engineering. — Mr. Holmes. 

A study of the production and engineering properties of metals, their alloys 
and the more important non-metallic materials. Laboratory exercises on the 
testing machine, heat treatment, microscopic study of metals, hardness testing, 
etc. Text: Mills, Materials of Construction. Inspection trips. A fee of $7.50 per 
semester is charged. 

11a. Fluid Mechanics. — Mr. Holmes. 

The properties of fluids; statics and dynamics of compressible and incompressi- 
ble fluids; accelerated liquids in relative equilibrium; Reynolds' number; Ber- 
noulli's theorem; flow of fluids in pipes, orifices and nozzles; flow with a free 
surface in channels and weirs; impulse and momentum in fluids; resistance of im- 
mersed and floating bodies; cavitation and dynamic similitude. A fee of $5.00 per 
semester is charged. 

12b. Thermodynamics. — Mr. Holmes. 

Energy, gas laws, vapors, mixtures of gases and vapors, flow of fluids, theoretical 
and actual thermodj'namic cycles for power and refrigeration. No fee. 

13a. Elements of Applied Electricity. — Mr. Rittenhouse. 

This course, while fundamental to the more advanced electrical courses, is 
adapted to the needs of those students desiring practical experience with the 
common applications of electricity. It includes a study of circuits, d.c. and a.c. 
generators and motors, lamps, heaters, etc. The instruction is carried on by text- 
book and laboratory work. Text: Cook, Elements of Electrical Engineering. A fee 
of $7.50 per semester is charged. 

14b. Alternating Current Theory and Practice. — Mr. Rittenhouse. 

A continuation of course 13a, with a more detailed study of alternating currents 
including power, electronics and communication apparatus. A fee of $7.50 per 
semester is charged. 

15a. Heat Engineering. — Four hours. Mr. Holmes. 

This course includes a study of steam and gas engines, turbines, condensers 
air-compressors, steam boilers, power-plant economies, and cost of power. Text: 
Severns and Degler, Steam, Air and Gas Power. 

One laboratory period a week is required. The laboratory exercises parallel the 
classroom work and include boiler and engine testing, fuel tests, gas analysis, 
calibration of instruments, etc. Comprehensive reports for each test are required. 
Inspection trip. A fee of $7.50 per semester is charged. 

16b. Strength of Materials. — Mr. Holmes. 

A study of stress and strain; of beams and columns; of shafting; of girders, 
trusses, combined stresses, etc. A series of tests on the screw testing-machine is 
made by each student. Text: Laurson and Cox, Mechanics of Materials. Inspection 
trips. A fee of $7.50 per semester is charged. Prerequisite, Engineering 8b. 



English Language and Literature 67 

17a. Electronics. — Mr. Benham. 

Lectures, problems and laboratory work covering fundamental principles, 
vacuum and gas tubes, photo-electric devices, etc. See Physics 15a. 

18b. Internal Combustion Engines. — Mr. Hetzel. 

A course on gasoline and Diesel engines, with particular attention to thermo- 
dynamics and the subject of fuels. Special topics may be arranged according to 
the interests of the group. Lectures, assigned reading, problems, laboratory ex- 
periments, inspection trips. No fixed fee. 

21a or 22b. Mechanical Laboratory. — Mr, Holmes and Mr. Hetzel. 

Operation, testing, and theory of steam, gas, hydraulic, and air machinery. 
Two periods of experimental work per week with reports on each test. If taken 
as 21a, the course may be continued through the second half-year by arrangement. 
Prerequisite, Engineering 15a. Assigned reading and comprehensive reports. 
A fee of $7.50 per semester is charged. 

23a. Electrical Circuits and Measurements. — Mr. Rittenhouse. 

Circuit theory and laboratory work covering magnetic, inductive, capacitive 
and polyphase circuits; transients, non-sinusoidal voltages and currents. Text: 
Weinbach, Alternating Current Circuits. A fee of $7.50 per semester is charged. 

24b. Electrical Theory and Experimentation. — Mr. Rittenhouse and Mr. 
Benham. 

Special topics in electronics, communications and power. This course will be 
suited to the needs of a limited number of students electing it. Prerequisite, 
Engineering 14b or 17a. 

25a, 26b. Special Projects in Engineering. — Mr. Rittenhouse, Mr. Holmes 
and Mr. Hetzel. 

Students majoring in Engineering are encouraged to do individual work in 
special fields of investigation. Each student devotes the time equivalent to one 
or two semester courses in comprehensive reading or experimental work and re- 
ports on some particular topic. No fixed fee. 

27a, 28b. Machine Design. — Mr. Hetzel. 

A study of the design of machine elements followed by a comprehensive design 
project in which a complete machine will be designed and detail working draw- 
mgs made. Open to Senior engineering majors. Text: Faires, Design of Machine 
Elements. No fixed fes. 

Engineering 7a was offered in the summer of 1943. 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

The department believes it essential to insure that all under- 
graduates are prepared to use the English language efficiently in 
their college courses, regardless of the nature of those courses. 
Freshmen, therefore, are required to prove their ability in this 
respect. 

It believes further that it must provide a general cultural back- 
ground for those students whose interests are chiefly scientific 
or technical. It off^ers, therefore, intermediate courses in English 
and American literature. 

It believes, finally, that it must provide courses for students 



68 Haverford College 

who intend to do graduate work in literature or related fields. 
It offers, therefore, advanced courses designed both in content and 
method to train students with serious special interests. 

The department recognizes that these intentions cannot be 
rigidly differentiated, and there is no intention that they should be. 
Considerable freedom is possible for the individual student after 
appropriate consultation. 

Major Requirements 

An individual program equal to six courses of two terms each, made up princi- 
pally from the advanced English courses with the approval of the Major Super- 
visor, and stressing the Elizabethan and nineteenth-century literature. 

la. Methods and Techniques of College Work. — Mr. Gibb. 

2b. Types of English Literature. — Mr. Sargent and Mr. Snyder. 

An analysis of drama, poetry, fiction and expository prose. 

3a. Advanced Freshman English. — Mr. Gibb. [Incorporated into English 4b, 
1943-1944.] 

Elective for those students who satisfy the instructor and the administration 
of their eligibility for advanced work. Limited to eight. 

4b. Intennediate Composition. — Mr. Gibb. 

A practical course in exposition and argumentation, written and oral, for 
Seniors, Juniors, Sophomores and Freshmen. Individual conferences to promote 
clear and logical presentation of difficult material. Limited to twenty. Apply in 
advance. 

8b. The English Bible.— Mr. Flight. 
(See Biblical Literature 8b.) 

lib. Shakespeare. — Hours to be arranged, second half-year. Mr. Sargent. 

Reading and study of twelve plays with emphasis on features of general and 
popular interest. Not restricted, but offered primarily for Sophomores. 

12a. Contemporary Drama. — Mr. Snyder. 

A study of the technique and practice of the modern drama, as illustrated in 
the works of Ibsen and the best modern dramatists of England and America. 
Not restricted, but offered primarily for Sophomores. 

14b. American Literature to the Civil War. — Mr. Snyder. 
[Not offered in 1943-44.] 

21b. Nineteenth-Century Prose Writers. — 

A reading course with conferences and occasional lectures on novelists from 
Austen to Hardy and essayists from Lamb to Morris. 
[Not offered in 1943-44.] 

22b. Nineteenth-Century Poets. — Mr. Snyder. 

A study of six poets: Coleridge, Wordsworth, Shelley, Byron, Keats, and 
Tennyson. Lectures and classroom discussions. 

23. Elizabethan Literature. — Mr. Sargent. 

Chief writers of the English Renaissance, omitting Shakespeare. Verse, prose 
and drama. Prerequisite, English lib. 



Geography and Geology 69 

26b. Eighteenth-Century Literatiire. — Mr. Snyder. 
The age of Johnson. 

27a. Greek Literature in EngUsh. — Mr. Post. 

{See Greek 27a.) 

28a. Creative Writing. — Mr. Sargent. 

Practice in writing imaginative literature. Chiefly confined to prose fiction. 
Regular assignments, class discussion and personal conferences. Limited to twelve 
Juniors and Seniors. 

[Incorporated into English 4b, 1943-44.] 

30b. Chaucer. — Mr. Sargent, 

Some introduction to the study of Middle English, but main emphasis upon 
analysis of the literary qualities of Troilus and Criseyde and The Canterbury Tales. 

32b. Contemporary English and American Literature. — Mr. Sargent. 

Selected twentieth-century writers, from Conrad and Crane to the present. 
Fiction, verse and criticism. Emphasis on development and treatment of literary 
problems in this period. Prerequisite, two half-courses in English beyond the 
Freshman year. 

[Not offered in 1943-14.] 

34a. Debating and Public Discussion. — 

[Not offered in 1943-44.] 

41a. Special Topics in Prose of the Romantic Period. 

Limited to twelve. Apply in advance. 
[Not offered in 1943-44.] 

42b. Special Topics in Poetry. — 

Important treatises on poetics from Aristotle to Whitman. An intensive study 
of Browning's poems. Limited to twelve. Required of all English Majors. Apply 
in advance. 

[Not offered in 1943-44.] 

43a. Methods of Literary Scholarship. — With special reference to Shake- 
speare. M. 7:30-9:30 p.m. and by appointment, first half-year. Mr. Sargent. 

A study of the aims, problems and methods of research in English literature 
by means of a survey of types of Shakespearean scholarship. Bi-weekly reports, 
and one piece of original investigation. Required of all English Majors. Apply in 
advance. Limited to twelve. 

[Not offered in 1943-44.] 

English la, 2b, 11a, and 42b were offered in the summer of 1943. 



GEOGRAPHY AND GEOLOGY 

1. Geography and Geology. — Mr. Dunn. 

A discussion of the general principles of the sciences, with special reference to 
North America, and to the Philadelphia region. Practical work in mineralogy, 
physiography, and stratigraphy is required. Three lectures a week (one omitted 
at option of instructor). Open to Juniors and Seniors without prerequisite. 

[Not offered in 1943-14.] 

2. Climate, Weather, and Terrain. — Mr. Dunn. 

[Not offered in 1943-44.] 



70 Haverford College 

GERMAN 

1, 2, 3, and 9a [10b] are primarily language courses. The remain- 
ing courses are devoted primarily to the history of German litera- 
ture, or to the intensive study of special periods or authors. The 
courses in literature are open to Juniors and Seniors, and to 
especially well qualified Sophomores. 

Scientific German texts may be read as regular collateral assign- 
ments in German 2 and German 3. 

Opportunity is given to students who complete German 1 or 
German 2 with distinction to advance rapidly into higher courses 
by passing a special examination in September on a prescribed 
program of vacation reading. 

Major Reqmrements 

German 3, 5a, 6b, 9a [10b], 11a, 12b, 13a, 14b, 15a. 

Supporting courses to be arranged in conference with Mr. Kelly. 

A comprehensive examination covering: 1. The German language; 2. History 
of the German language; 3. German literature; 4. German history, 1517-1914; 
and 5. A special period, literary movement, or author. 

1. Elementary Gennan. — Mr. Kelly and Mr. Pfund. 
Grammar, conversation, and the reading of simple texts. 

2. Intermediate German. — Mr. Kelly and Mr. Pfund. 

Texts of moderate difficulty are read both in class and as outside work. One 
hour a week is devoted to composition. So far as practicable German is the lan- 
guage of the classroom. Scientific German may be chosen as collateral reading. 

7a. Intermediate German. — Mr. Kelly. 

3. Advanced Gennan. — Mr. Pfund. 

Reading of standard works of German literature. Composition and Conversa- 
tion. The collateral reading may be done in literary or scientific German. Pre- 
requisite, German 2 or entrance German 3. 

5a. The Beginnings of Modem German Literature. — A study of Lessing and 
the early works of Goethe and Schiller. Hours to be arranged, first half-year, 
Mr. Kelly. 

Prerequisite, German 3 or the equivalent. 
[Not offered in 1944-45.] 

6b. The Classical Period of German Literatiire. — A study of the mature works 
of Goethe and Schiller. Hours to be arranged, second half-year. Mr. Kelly. 

Prerequisite, German 5a or the equivalent. 
[Not offered in 1944-45.] 

9a or 10b. Advanced Composition and Conversation. — Mr. Pfund. 
Prerequisite, German 3 or the equivalent. 

11a. History of German Literature from its origins to the seventeenth cen- 
tury. Mr. Pfund. 

Lectures in German, with collateral reading in modern German translation. 
Discussions. Written and oral reports. 
Prerequisite, German 3. 



Government 71 

12b. History of German Literature from the seventeenth century to the pres- 
ent. Suggested hours, Tu. 7:30-10 p.m., second half-year. Mr. Pfund. 

A survey course with lectures in German. Collateral reading. Discussions. 
Written and oral reports. 
Prerequisite, German 3. 

13a. German Romanticism. — Hours to be arranged, first half-year. Mr. Kelly. 

A study of the Romantic movement in Germany and its relations to similar 
movements in England and France. 
Prerequisite, German 3. 

[Not offered in 1943^4.] 

14b. The German Drama of the Nineteenth Century. — Mr. Kelly. 
[Not offered in 1943-44.] 

15a. Faust. — Mr. Pfund. 

An intensive study of Goethe's Faust in the original. Consideration is given to 
kindred works in European literature. 

17a. The Life and Works of Richard Wagner. — Mr. Kelly. 

18b. German Lyric Poetry. — Mr, Pfund. 

1 R & R. Elementary German. — See Reconstruction and Relief. 
German 1, 2a, and 3a were offered in the summer of 1943. 

GOVERNMENT 

Courses in Government are designed with three purposes: to 
provide an understanding of the philosophy behind and the evolu- 
tion of poHtical ideas; to study contemporary forms and processes 
of local, state, national, and international government; to provide 
training for students entering public service, journalism, or the law. 

Major Requirements 

Government 3a, 4b, 17a, and 18b. 

Any four other courses of one term each in Government. 
Any four other courses of one term each in any of the social sciences. 
A three-hour examination in political philosophy. 

A four-hour examination in other courses taken in the Department of Govern- 
ment. 

2b. Government and Economic Resources. — Mr. Pancoast. 

A study of the basic geographical factors which have influenced political policies, 
governmental institutions, and economic adjustments. 

3a. American Federal Government. — Mr. Herndon. 

A study of the origin and structure of the American Federal governmental 
system. 

This course is intended primarily for Freshmen and Sophomores, and is a pre- 
requisite for higher-numbered courses in this department. 

4b. American Public Administration. — Mr. Herndon. 

A study of the functioning of the American Federal governmental system, in- 
cluding its participation in the program of the United Nations. 
[Not offered in 1943-1944.] 



72 Haverford College 

5a. Contemporary Legislation. — Mr. Herndon. 

A study of the technique of legislation and an analysis of certain selected bills 
currently before Congress. 
[Not offered in 1943-1944.] 

8b. Government Finance. — Mr. Herndon 

A study of the general principles of public revenues, public expenditures, public 
indebtedness, fiscal administration, and of the principles of equity in the dis- 
tribution of tax burdens. Prerequisite, Government 3 or Economics 1. 

Also called Economics 8b. 

9a. Constitutional Law. — Mr. Herndon. 

A study of the principles of constitutional interpretation and of the leading de- 
cisions of the Supreme Court. This course also includes readings in selected works 
on constitutional development and lectures on the essentials of jurisprudence. 

10b. State and Local Government. — Mr. Herndon. 

A study of the structure and administration of state and local government, with 
special reference to: Pennsylvania; Montgomery, Delaware, and Philadelphia 
Counties; Haverford and Lower Merion Townships. 

[Not offered in 1943-1944.] 

11a. Government and Business. — Mr. Teaf. 
See Economics 11a. 

13a. American Foreign Policy. — Mr. Herndon. 

A study of the basic foreign policies which have evolved in the experience of the 
United States, and the adaptations which have been found necessary in recent 
times. 

15a. Development of Political and Economic Problems. — Mr. Stinnes, as- 
sisted by Mr. Pancoast. 

A lecture and seminar course on the more significant economic and social prob- 
lems growing out of the Reformation, American and French Revolutions, and the 
Industrial Revolution. 

[Not offered in 1943-1944.] 

16. Totalitarian Governments. — Mr. Chamberlain. 

A lecture and seminar course on the philosophy underlying the governments of 
Italy, Germany, Russia, and Japan. 

17a. The Development of Political Thought. — Mr. Morley, assisted by Mr. 
Herndon. 

A seminar course based upon the writings of selected political philosophers from 
Plato to the present day. 

18b. Planning for the Post- War World. — Mr. Stinnes. 

A seminar course based upon study of the principal plans now being considered 
for the political organization of the states of the World after conclusion of the 
present war. 

Students interested in taking certain courses offered by the Faculty in Politics 
of Bryn Mawr College should consult Mr. Herndon. 

Government 10b was offered in the summer of 1943. 

GREEK 

Instruction in Greek aims from the outset to introduce the stu- 
dent to the thought and culture of ancient Greece. Greek language 



History 73 

is important for its relations to other European languages and for 
its effect on modern scientific terminology, particularly in medicine. 
Greek literature and thought have always been an important 
force in the modern world; in connection with their study the re- 
curring principles of behavior, statecraft, philosophy, and drama 
are stressed. 

Major Requirements 

Greek 3, and four half-year courses from Greek 7a, 8b, 9a, 10b, 11a, 12b, 27a, 
and History 13a. 

Three additional courses to be arranged in conference with Mr. Post. 

If Greek 3 is not taken in college, an additional half-course will be required. 

A comprehensive examination on Greek language and literature, Greek history 
and Greek civilization. 

1. Elementary Greek. — Mr. Post. 

Thorough study of the elements of the language followed by the reading of 
simple Attic prose. This course should be taken in Freshman year, if possible. 

2. Intermediate Greek. — Mr. Post. 

A rapid reading course in such authors as Homer, Herodotus, and Euripides. 

3a, 4b. Advanced Intermediate Greek. — Mr. Post. 

Selections from Plato, Menander, Aristophanes, and the tragedians are read. 

7a, 8b. Advanced Greek. — Mr. Post. 

The instructor will arrange with students electing this course for systematic 
study of special subjects in Greek philosophy, history, or literature in connection 
with the reading of Greek authors. 

9a, 10b. Advanced Greek. — Mr. Post. 

A continuation of the work done in Greek 7a, 8b. 

11a, 12b. Advanced Greek Prose Composition. — Mr. Post. 

This course should be taken by all candidates for final honors in Greek. 

27a. Greek Literature in English. — Mr. Post. 

Lectures on Greek literature. Reading of Greek poetry, drama, and literary 
criticism in translation. Essays and discussions. No knowledge of Greek is re- 
quired in this course, but a general acquaintance with English literature is es- 
sential. Also called English 27a. 

HISTORY 

The study of History provides a background against which 
many current problems may be viewed to advantage, and it tends 
to develop critical standards for the evaluation of evidence. It is 
further important as a foundation for professional studies in fields 
such as journalism and the law. 

Major Requirements 

Four full-year courses (or three full-year courses and two half-year courses) in 
History, other than History 1 and 8a. 

Two full-year courses or their equivalent in related departments. 
Four review examinations of three hours each. 



74 Haverford College 

1. English History. — Mr. Lunt. 

A survey of political, constitutional, economic, and social history, intended as 
an introductory course. 

2. Fotindations of the United States, 1492-1865. — Mr. Drake 

Lectures, reading, and discussion in American colonial and early national his- 
tory. Elective for undergraduates who have been in residence two terms. 

3. National Development of the United States, 1865 to the Present. — Mr. 
Drake. 

A study of institutional growth, with the larger social and political issues of 
the present considered in their historical setting. A lecture, reading, and discus- 
sion course. Elective for undergraduates who have been in residence two terms. 

[Not offered in 1943-44.] 

4. English Constitutional History. — 

A study of the formation and growth of English institutions, designed to be 
useful particularly to those who are interested in government and law. Elective 
for undergraduates who have been in residence two terms. 

[Not offered in 1943-44.] 

5. Mediaeval History. — Mr. Lunt. 

A survey of the history of Europe from the time of the barbarian invasions to 
about 1500. Elective for undergraduates who have been in residence two terms. 
[Not offered in 1943-44.] 

6. Modem European History. — Mr. Lunt. 

A survey of the history of Europe from about 1500 to the present. Elective for 
undergraduates who have been in residence two terms. 

8b. Ancient History of the Near East. — Mr. Flight. (Also called Biblical 
Literature 5a.) 

Elective for undergraduates who have been in residence two terms. 

13a. Greek History. — Mr. H. Comfort. 

A survey of Greek history, with frequent reports on the art, archaeology, and 
political institutions of Greece. A knowledge of Greek is not required. 
Elective for undergraduates who have been in residence two terms. 
[Not offered in 1943-14.] 

14b. Roman History. — Mr. H. Comfort. 

A survey of Roman history to the time of Constantine. Frequent class reports 
on special topics. A knowledge of Latin is not required. 

Elective for undergraduates who have been in residence two terms. 

HUMANISTIC STUDIES 
la, 2b. Mr. Post. 

This course is designed to introduce students to the life and literature of the 
Far East through the use of translations and to develop their mastery of a major 
field and of expository writing. G. Nye Steiger, A History of the Far East, is recom- 
mended for supplementary reading. Essays weekly or biweekly for discussion 
at individual meetings with the instructor, It may be taken as one or two half- 
courses in either half-year by a limited number of students who will be admitted 
only after a personal interview and only if there is still room for them when they 
apply to the instructor. 



Latin 75 

LATIN 

The courses in Latin supplement the intensive foundation work 
of the secondary school by means of more extensive reading over a 
wider range of literature, illustrating successive eras of culture 
from the third century B.C. to the sixteenth century A.D. By in- 
culcating a fuller knowledge of the Latin language as a tool, the 
same courses open the door to a better command of English, 
Romance languages, philosophy, and history. 

Major Requirements 

Four full-year courses in Latin (not including 1, 3, 5a, and 66). 

Two such additional full-year courses in other departments as are arranged in 
conference between the student and the professors in charge. 

A comprehensive written examination on Roman history, literature, and civil- 
ization, and the classical heritage of medieval and modern times. Candidates for 
honors must also take an oral examination. 

1. Elementary Latin. — Mr. H. Comfort. 

Grammar, reading, composition. Prepares students for Latin 3. 

3. Cicero. — Mr. Lockwood. 

Orations of Cicero and readings in other prose authors. 

5a, 6b. Vergil. — Mr. H. Comfort. 

Six books of Vergil's Aeneid and readings in other Roman poets. 

7. Survey of Classical Roman Literature. — Mr. Lockwood. 

Rapid reading of classical authors from Plautus to Suetonius. Emphasis will 
be laid on literary history and appreciation. Text: Lockwood, A Survey of Classical 
Roman Literature. 

Any of the following higher courses may be repeated, with change of content, for 
full credit. 

9a, 10b. Readings in Latin Literature. — Mr. Lockwood and Mr. H. Comfort. 

Individual work. Each student may select a field of writing which is correlated 
with his other college courses (e.g. in philosophy, history, Romance languages, or 
English literature) or he may pursue more intensive work in one of the periods or 
one of the literary types surveyed in Latin 7 or IL 

U. Survey of Medieval Latin Literature. — Mr. Lockwood. 

Rapid reading of selections from the post-classical, Christian, and medieval 
Latin writers. Study of the phases of European civilization represented in Latin 
literature. 

13a, 14b. Advanced Prose Composition. — Mr. Lockwood. 

Either 13a or 14b is required of candidates for Final Honors. 

17. Roman Law. — Mr. Lockwood. 

Reading of selections from the Institutes, the Digest, and other texts and sources 
of Roman Law. 

MATHEMATICS 

Freshman mathematics is designed to provide that background 
of trigonometry, algebra and analytic geometry which is necessary 



76 Haverford College 

for any serious student of the physical or social sciences and which 
is culturally desirable for many others. 

The more advanced courses are arranged to meet the needs of 
two groups in addition to those majoring in mathematics: 

(1) Students of Chemistry, Physics, and Engineering, who 
should take Mathematics 2 and in many cases Mathematics 3 and 
Mathematics 11a. 

(2) Students, such as economists and biologists, who need 
statistics in their major fields and who should take Mathematics 
13a and 14h. 

The department major prepares for teaching in preparatory 
schools, for graduate study leading to college teaching, and for 
statistical and actuarial work. 

Major Requirements 

Mathematics 1, 2, 3, 7a, 8b, 9a, 10b, Ua, and 16b. 

Prescribed parallel reading on the history and general principles of Mathemat- 
ics. 

Three written comprehensive examinations, each three hours in length. An oral 
examination will be required of candidates for final honors. 

It is recommended that facility in reading French and German be acquired as 
early in the College Course as possible. 

1. Freshman Mathematics. — Four hours. Mr. Oakley, and Mr. Holmes. 

First semester — Plane Trigonometry, including logarithms and the solution of 
triangles. Topics in college algebra including complex numbers, combinations and 
permutations, determinants, and the elements of the theory of equations. 

Second semester — Analytic Geometry . General methods in the plane with applica- 
tions to conic sections and other curves. Introduction to the geometry of three 
dimensions. 

Freshmen with superior preparation are invited to discuss with the depart- 
ment the possibility of their taking Mathematics 7a, 9b, or in rare cases Mathe- 
matics 2, in place of Mathematics 1. 

2. Calculus. — Mr. Wilson. 

Differential and Integral Calculus, with applications. Prerequisite, Mathe- 
matics 1. Specially well qualified Freshmen may elect this course with the per- 
mission of the department. 

3. Advanced Calculus and Differential Equations. — Mr. Gummere. 
Prerequisite, Mathematics 2. 

7a. Theory of Equations. — Mr. Allendoerfer. 

Advanced theory of equations, determinants, matrices. Open to specially well 
qualified freshmen in place of Mathematics la. Otherwise Prerequisite Mathe- 
matics la. 

8a. Advanced Algebra. — Mr. Allendoerfer. 

Introduction to number theory and modern abstract algebra. Prerequisites, 
Mathematics 2, 7a. 

[Offered on request to majors only.] 

9b. Plane and Solid Analytic Geometry. — Mr. Allendoerfer. 

Review of plane analytic geometry followed by solid analytic geometry. Open 
to freshmen with a knowledge of analytic geometry in place of Mathematics lb. 
Otherwise, Prerequisite Mathematics lb. 



Music 77 

lOb. Introduction to Higher Geometry. — Mr. Allendoerfer. 

Projective geometry from the synthetic and the analytic points of view. Klein's 
theory of general geometries including the standard non-Euclidean cases. Pre- 
requisites, Mathematics 2, 9b. 

[Offered on request to majors only.] 

11a. Partial Differential Equations and Fourier Series. — Mr. Green 

Problem course, with many applications to Chemistry, Engineering and Physics. 
Prerequisite, Mathematics 3. 
[Offered Summer 1944.] 

13b. Introduction to Statistics. — Mr. Oakley. 

Tabular and graphic methods, frequency distribution, averages, measures of 
central tendency, dispersion and skewness, correlation, tests of significance. 
Lectures and laboratory. Prerequisite, Mathematics 1. A fee of $5.00 per semester 
is charged. 

[Offered second semester 1943-44.] 

14a. Advanced Statistics, Elementary Probabilities and Finite DifiEerences.— 

Mr. Oakley. 

This course is designed for students who are interested in statistical and actuar- 
ial work. Prerequisite, Mathematics 2 and 13b. 
[Not offered 1943-44.] 

15a or 16b. Special topics. — Mr. Wilson, Mr. Oakley, Mr. Allendoerfer, 
and Mr. Green. 

The content of this course may vary from year to year to suit the needs of 
advanced students. May be repeated for credit. 

19a. Mechanics. — Mr. Sutton 

Analytical mechanics treating the statics, kinematics, and dynamics of par- 
ticles and rigid bodies. Lectures and problems on the application of calculus and 
vector methods to mechanical systems including a brief treatment of Lagrange's 
equations and the special theory of relativity. Text: Synge and Griffith, Principles 
of Mechanics. Prerequisites: Physics 2 and Mathematics 3 (or Mathematics 3 may 
be taken concurrently). No fee. 

Also called Physics 9a. 

Mathematics 1, 2, 3a, 11a were offered in the summer of 1943. 



MUSIC 

In addition to a considerable collection of musical scores and 
books in the general library, the special equipment of the IVIusic 
Department consists of a collection of phonograph records, scores, 
and books presented in 1933 by the Carnegie Corporation and 
amplified by yearly accessions to double its original size (ca. 1600 
records), two Steinway pianos, and a Hammond organ with a 
"Model E type" console. This equipment, but for the organ, is 
housed in the new Music Room in the Haverford Union. (The 
organ is in Roberts Hall.) 

The new Music Room is open to students, army, and faculty at 
certain hours. It is used for music classes and in preparation for 
them, for record playing and rehearsals. A series of informal con- 
certs will take place in it on certain Sunday nights during 1943-44. 



78 Haverford College 

The Haverford College Glee Club will hold its concerts on the 
campus and outside in cooperation with the Cap and Bells. Its 
membership is composed of civilian and army students. Rehearsals 
are held on Thursdays and Sundays. Joint concerts are given with 
other institutions, for the sake of performing works for mixed 
voices. Musically endowed students will find ample opportunity 
to study the musical masterpieces at first hand, through singing 
and playing. 

A series of formal concerts in Roberts Hall, at which well-known 
soloists as well as outside choral and instrumental ensembles will 
be presented, will take place during the academic year 1943-44. 

1. Introduction to Music History and Appreciation. 
[Not offered in 1943-44 ] 

Intended for those students who have a general interest in music without as yet 
possessing the necessary criteria in approaching it, listening to it intelligently, and 
appraising it. Devoted to the study of the basic forms of musical art, an analysis 
of the modern orchestra, and the acquisition of a historical perspective. No pre- 
requisites. 

2. The main periods of Music History from the Renaissance to the Nineteenth 
Century. 

Music in the Nineteenth Century. 
[Not offered in 1943-44.] 

A study of the succession of styles in music (e.g. the Palestrina style, the 
Baroque, the Classical style of the Viennese masters etc.). Analysis of motets, 
madrigals, concerti, sonatas, and symphonies. The study of the Nineteenth 
Century includes the Romantic symphony, chamber and piano music, the opera 
from Rossini to Verdi, Wagner, and the Russians, the art song from Schubert 
to Wolf. Prerequisite Music la or some previous acquaintance with music. 

3. Musical Craftsmanship. Mr. Swan. 

A beginners' course for those who want to be initiated into musical composiion. 
After disposing of the rudiments of music (notation, clefs, intervals, etc.), the 
student is taught the principles of melodic construction, and of writing in two parts 
melodically. Practice in the simpler contrapuntal, harmonic and rhythmic devices. 
Scoring for various instruments. No prerequisites. 

4. Instrumentation (in combination with the Department of Physics). Mr. 
Pepinsky. 

A study of the orchestral instruments from the point of view of their tone-color 
and tone-production, their idiosyncrasies and limitations, and the effects of combi- 
nation in ensemble. An intimate study of the scores of master works will be made. 
A knowledge of harmony and performance on a musical instrument is pre-requisite. 
Text; Forsythe, Orchestration, The Macmillan Co. 

PHILOSOPHY 

The courses in philosophy are intended to help men face and 
examine the great issues of life, to acquaint them with the major 
currents of reflection upon the nature of the universe, and to assist 
them in finding their own way to a more ordered and intelligent 



Philosophy 79 

relation with their world. The work aims to acquaint the students 
with the great classical thinkers and movements of philosophy and 
to put them in touch with present day philosophical discussions. 

Major Requirements 

Philosophy la, 5, 7a. 

Four other half-year courses in Philosophy. 

Four half-year courses in related fields to be arranged in conference with the 
professor in charge. 

A comprehensive examination in two parts: three hours on the History of 
Philosophy and three hours on one optional field selected from Topics in Philoso- 
phy since 1800, or Religious Thought, or Psychology. 

la. Elementary Psychology. — Mr. Hepp. 

A survey of the present status of scientific knowledge concerning the psy- 
chological processes and activities of man, together with a consideration of how 
such knowledge is obtained and how it may be applied. 

2b. Advanced Psychology. — Mr. Steere. 

A study of the nature and functioning of personality by an examination of 
personality in difficulties. Both the forms of abnormal behavior and the modern 
theories of psychotherapy will be studied. Lectures, class reports, and occasional 
trips to clinics. Elective for twelve Juniors and Seniors and only by consent of 
instructor. Prerequisite, Philosophy la. 

This course is designed for advanced students only. 

3a. Introduction to Philosophy. — Mr. Hepp. 

An understanding of the nature and function of philosophy and of its relations 
to other fundamental human interests such as science, religion, and art is sought 
through a consideration of representative philosophical problems. 

[Not offered in 1943-44.] 

5. History of Philosophy. — Mr. Steere and Mr. Hepp. 

A study of the development of philosophy with special reference to Plato, 
Aristotle, Descartes, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, Spinoza, Leibnitz, Kant, and Hegel. 
First-hand acquaintance with selected writings of these philosophers, reports, 
lectures, and class discussions. Philosophy 3a is recommended but not required. 

7a. Ethics. — Mr. Steere. 

The course will study (1) conflicts of ethical values involved in contemporary 
life; (2) certain classical ethical devices for resolving those conflicts; (3) the role 
of the individual and of the group in the realization of ethical values. Case ma- 
terial drawn from contemporary situations and from literature will be widely 
used. Discussions, lectures and papers. 

9a. Classics of Religious Literature. — Mr. Steere. 

A study which will include such books as Augustine, Confessions; Bernard of 
Clairvaux, On Consideration; Meister Eckhart, Sermons; Little Flowers of St. 
Francis of Assisi; Thomas a Kempis, Imitation of Christ; Theologica Germanica; 
Theresa of Avila, Autobiography ; Frances de Sales, Introduction to the Devout Life; 
Lancelot Andrewes, Preces Privatae; Pascal, Thoughts; Isaac Penington, Letters; 
John Wesley, Journal; John Henry Newman, Apologia; George Tyrrell, Auto- 
biography. 

[Not offered in 1943-44.] 

10b. Nineteenth-Century Thinkers. — Mr. Steere. 

Selected writings of Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, Tolstoy, and Bergson. 



80 Haverford College 

lla. Logic. — Mr. Hepp. 

The principles of valid inference and their application to reasoning in every-day 
life and in the sciences; the syllogism and other types of formal reasoning, the 
nature of proof, the detection of fallacies; introduction to the logic of scientific 
method and to contemporary developments in symbolic logic. 

[Not offered in 1943-44.] 

12b. Philosophy of Science. — Mr. Hepp. 

This course, designed for students with a general cultural interest as well as 
for those specializing in some one of the sciences, aims at an understanding of the 
nature of scientific knowledge, the logical methods of science, and the structure 
of scientific systems. The course will aid students of the special sciences in ap- 
preciating the manner in which the work of their own field expresses man's scien- 
tific interest and contributes to the scientific world-view. Basic concepts such as 
induction, causation, probability, measurement, explanation, prediction, and 
verification are analyzed. 

15a. History and Philosophy of Quakerism. — Mr. W. W. Comfort. 

The Quaker Movement is studied in its relation to other intellectual and re- 
ligious movements of its time, particularly those found in English philosophy. 
The development of the dominant Quaker conceptions is traced to the present 
day and critically examined. The course is designed for non-Friends as well as for 
Friends. Not open to Freshmen. 

17a, 18b. The Development of Political Thought. — Mr. Morley, assisted by 
Mr. Herndon. See Government 17a, 18b. 

21. Philosophical Seminar. — Mr. Steere and Mr. Hepp. 

Specialized work in some restricted field of philosophic or religious thought is 
undertaken, the precise subject depending upon the needs of the students and the 
general interests of the group. Primarily designed for seniors majoring in philoso- 
phy and for graduates. 

Philosophy la and 21 were offered in the summer of 1943. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

The college equipment for outdoor athletics includes: Walton 
Field for football and track and field sports, with a concrete and 
wood grandstand and 440-yard oval and 220-yard, eight-lane 
straightaway cinder tracks; the Class of 1888 and Merion Fields for 
Association (soccer) football, both of which are used for baseball 
in the spring; a skating pond; Cope Field for cricket, with players* 
pavilion; an athletic field, presented by the Class of 1916; a base- 
ball field, presented by the Class of 1922 and used also for soccer 
in the fall ; and twelve tennis courts, five of which were presented 
by the Class of 1923. 

The Gymnasium contains a main floor, sixty by ninety feet, 
used for basketball and intramural sports. Adjoining the main 
floor are offices for the instructors, the administration of physical 
examinations, and for special student conferences. Adjoining the 
main hall is a large and comfortable reading room for the use of the 
College athletic coaches and alumni. The basement contains dress- 



Physics 81 

ing rooms, a number of well ventilated lockers, shower baths, a 
pool, a wrestling room and storage room for athletic equipment. 
Through the courtesy of the Merion Cricket Club and the Merion 
Golf Club, facilities for squash are available. 

A thorough physical examination with a series of efficiency tests 
is given to each student upon entrance, and another at the end of 
Sophomore year. A Tuberculin Test is given to all Freshmen, fol- 
lowed by an X-ray if necessary, as part of this required examina- 
tion. No student whose physical condition is unsatisfactory will be 
permitted to represent the College on any athletic team. 

Course 1 is required of Freshmen; Course 2, of Sophomores; 
Course 3, of Juniors. 

These courses are arranged in accordance with the plan for all- 
year physical training during Freshman and Sophomore years, and 
part-year physical training during Junior year. All accelerated 
summer students must participate in some activity. For Physical 
Education J and 2 — a half course credit will be given. For Physical 
Education 3 — a pass or failure will be shown. 

Work on varsity and junior varsity squads may be substituted 
for regular Physical Education requirements. 

1. Physical Education — Three hours. Mr. Haddleton, Mr. Evans, Mr. 
Bramall, and Mr. Mullan. 

A course of elementary instruction in athletic games, including football, soccer, 
basketball, tennis, golf, track, volley ball, handball, badminton; partly elective. 
Special corrective exercises during the 2nd and 3rd quarters. 

2. Physical Education. — Three hours. Mr. Haddleton, Mr. Evans, Mr. 
Bramall, and Mr. Mullan. 

A course of advanced instruction in athletic games with emphasis on intra- 
mural sports. 

3. Physical Education. — Three hours. Mr. Haddleton, Mr, Evans, Mr. 
Bramall, and Mr. Mullan. 

A course almost entirely elective, involving participation in some organized and 
supervised athletic activity during two of the three athletic seasons of the college 
year. 

PHYSICS 

The introductory courses are Physics 1 and 2. The first of these 
covers elementary Physics a little more thoroughly than a second- 
ary school course, but the laboratory work is designed especially 
for those who do not expect to specialize in physics. Physics 2 
is the basic course for further work in physics, chemistry, or engi- 
neering. It covers the work required in physics for admission to 
many medical schools. 



82 Haverford College 

Physics 1-2 is given in the summer term only. It covers much 
of the work of Physics 2 intensively but less thoroughly. For the 
present any one of the courses Physics 1 or 2 or 1-2 will be ac- 
cepted as the required prerequisite for admission to the more 
advanced courses. 

Students intending to specialize in physics, chemistry, or medi- 
cine should also elect Physics 3. 

Major Requirements 

Physics 2 (1 or 1-2), 13 and two courses of two terms each from Physics 3, 4b, 
5a, 7a, 8b, 9a, 10b, Ua, 12b, 15a, 16b. 

History of Physics. 

Mathematics 2, and one or one and one-half courses from Chemistry 1 or 2, 
Engineering 13a, 14b, 23a, 24b, Astronomy la, 3a, 4b, or additional mathematics. 

A comprehensive examination based upon above-mentioned courses. 

1. Introductory Physics. — Four hours. Mr. Palmer. 

An elementary course designed for students who have had no previous study of 
physics, especially for those who may have no intention of specializing in science. 
Its purpose is to acquaint students with the principles underlying common physi- 
cal phenomena and to illustrate, by lecture table experiments, solution of problems 
and simple laboratory experiments, how these principles apply to matters of 
everyday experience. This is a much less exacting course than Physics 2. Text: 
Black. An Introductory Course in College Physics. A fee of $7.50 per semester is 
charged. 

1-2. Physics. — Mr. Hetzel. 

This is an intensive summer term course intended to cover much of the ground 
of Physics 2, with the omission of selected topics, in a period of two months. 
Text, prerequisites, and fees are the same as those for Physics 2. 

2. General Physics. — Four hours. Mr. Palmer, and Mr. Atkinson. 

Mechanics, heat, sound, magnetism, electricity, and light are studied with the 
help of problems and lecture demonstrations. A feature of this course is the labora- 
tory work, the chief aim of which is accuracy of observation and measurement. 
Text: Saunders, A Survey of Physics. Prerequisites, Trigonometry, and Entrance 
Physics or Physics 1. A fee of $7.50 per semester is charged. 

3. Ions, Electrons, Radiations, and Atomic Structure. — Mr. Palmer. 

A large amount of reading supplementary to the lectures is required in the 
library of reference books. Experiments are performed by the class as a whole upon 
such subjects as: atomic and molecular dimensions, weight, and numbers; mag- 
nitude of charge and ratio E-i-M for electrolytic ions; e-f-m for cathode rays; 
properties of gaseous ions; measurement of the electronic charge e by Millikan's 
oil-drop method; current and space charge in an electron tube; photo-electric 
effect; radiation and ionization potentials; X-ray spectra; rate of decay of thorium 
emanation, and of the active deposit from radon; counting the alpha particles 
from a specimen of polonium. Prerequisites, Physics 2, Physics 1-2. A fee of 
$7.50 per semester is charged. 

4b. Spectroscopy. — Mr. Sutton. 
[Not offered in 1943-44.] 

Lectures, readings, and experiments on spectroscopy and atomic structure giving 
emphasis upon the underlying theory and offering acquaintance with the labora- 
tory methods involved. A fee of $7.50 per semester is charged. 



Physics 83 

5a. Transmission Systems. — Mr. Benham. 

Lectures, class discussions and occasional experiments on the theory and prac- 
tice of networks. The course covers reduction and transformation of complex 
impedance and resistance networks, resonance in electrical circuits, transmission 
lines, filters, coupled circuits, equalizers, and bridge circuits. Text: W. L. Everitt, 
Communication Engineering. Prerequisites: Physics 2, Physics 1-2, Mathematics 2. 
Laboratory fee $7.50 per semester. 

7a. Electricity and Magnetism. — Mr. Benham. 
[Not offered in 1943^4.] 

Lectures and laboratory experiments in precision electrical measurements. This 
course treats such topics as Kirchhoff's laws. Gauss's theorem, magnetic circuits, 
potential, capacity, inductance, alternating current, and the laws of the electro, 
magnetic field. Textbook: Page and Adams, Principles of Electricity. Prere- 
quisites, Physics 2, Physics 1-2, and Mathematics 2. Fee $7.50 per semester. 

8b. Intermediate Radio Communication. — Mr. Benham. 

Lecture and laboratory course in high frequency transmission and reception. 
Textbook: Terman, Radio Engineering. Prerequisites, Physics 2 and Mathematics 
2, and preferably Physics 7a. A fee of $7.50 per semester is charged. 

9a. (See Mathematics 19a.) — Mr. Sutton 

10b. Introduction to Mathematical Physics. — Mr. Sutton. 

Lectures and problems on selected topics in mathematical physics, such as 
hydrodynamics, thermodynamics, kinetic theory, wave motion, theory of electric 
fields, etc. Textbook: Page, Introduction to Theoretical Physics. This course and 
Physics 9a are complementary courses affording one full year in theoretical 
physics, but a student may elect either half. Prerequisites, Physics 2, Physics 
i-2,and Mathematics 3 (or Mathematics 3 may be taken concurrently). No fee. 

11a. Optics and Photography. — Mr. Sutton. 

A study of the principles of physical optics with special reference to photography 
followed by a systematic study of the photographic process. Laboratory work in- 
cludes both measurements in optics and photographic dark-room manipulations. 
Text: Mack and Martin, The Photographic Process. A fee of $7.50 per semester 
is charged. Prerequisite, Physics 1 or 2, or 1-2. 

12b. Sotmd. — Second half-year; Mr. Benham. 

A course of lectures, readings and class experiments designed to familiarize the 
student with recent developments in acoustics. Study is given to the funda- 
mentals of sound wave propagation, modern electrical and mechanical acoustic 
systems, architectural acoustics, supersonics, speech and hearing, and the analysis 
of musical sound. Prerequisite, Physics 2, Physics 1-2, Mathematics 2. Fee, $7.50 
per semester. 

13. Physics Seminar. — Mr. Palmer, Mr. Sutton, and Mr. Benham. 

Advanced students in physics are encouraged to do individual work in special 
fields of investigation. Each student devotes the time equivalent to a full course 
in pursuing comprehensive reading and experimental work on some particular 
topic. Weekly meetings are held with the members of the department to discuss 
the progress in each field of investigation, so that each student becomes familiar 
with problems other than his own. In this course, the accomplishment of scholarly 
work of a nature preliminary to research work is the basis for awarding credit 
toward a degree. Fee, $10.00 per semester. 

14b. Communications. — Mr. Benham. 

An introduction to such subjects as telephone, telegraph, teletype and facsimile 
(picture transmission) is given. Also, a major part of the work is devoted to learn- 
ing the Continental Morse code. Laboratory periods are spent in practicing receiv- 



84 Haverford College 

ing and sending the code under the guidance of the Instructor. Supplementary 
reading and code practice are required. Prerequisite, Physics 1 or elementary 
physics. 

15a. Electronics. — (See Engineering 17a.) Mr. Benham. 

This course includes material introductory to electron theory, study and ap- 
plication of vacuum-tubes and problems pertaining to design and analysis of 
typical circuits employing the vacuum-tube. Laboratory experiments are de- 
signed to give the student experience in the handling of apparatus in which the 
vacuum-tube is used. Prerequisites, Physics 2, Physics 1-2. Laboratory fee, 
$7.50 per semester. 

16b. Advanced Radio. — Mr. Benham. 

This course takes up the design and operation of such apparatus as radio trans- 
mitters, receivers, cathode-ray oscillograph, frequency modulated transmitters, 
television. Laboratory periods are intended to give the student experience in 
handling receiving and transmitting equipment. Prerequisite, Physics 15a or 8b. 
Laboratory fee, $7.50. 

Physics 1-2, 7a and 8b were offered in the summer of 1943. 
ROMANCE LANGUAGES 

The first objective of instruction in the Romance Languages is the cultivation 
of fluent and accurate command of the contemporary idiom, both written and oral. 
Exceptional opportunities for developing oral facility in French, Spanish, Italian 
and German are afforded by residence in the Language House. 

Study of the national literatures of France, Spain and Italy presupposes more 
than elementary facility in conversation and composition. Admission to literature 
courses is therefore contingent upon the consent of the instructor, which will not 
ordinarily be granted earlier than the completion of at least French 3 or Spanish 2 
or Italian 1 , or their equivalents. 

The Department of Romance Languages offers Major Programs in French and 
in Spanish. 

French 
Major Requirements 

French 3, 4, 16b, 17a, 18b, 19a. 

History of France since 1515. 

Supporting courses in the Latin, German, Spanish, Italian and English lan- 
guages and literatures. History of Art, Philosophy: to be arranged in individual 
conference. 

A written and oral comprehensive examination on the language, literature and 
history of France. 

1. Elementary French. — Mr. Wylie. 

Oral and written introduction to the French language. 

2. Intermediate Elementary French. — Mr. Stokes. 

A continuation of the work of French 1, with additional emphasis on composi- 
tion. 

3. Advanced Elementary French. — Mr. L' H£ritier. 

A continuation of the work of French 2, with additional emphasis on reading. 

4. Advanced French Conversation and Composition. — Mr. Stokes. 

Normal prerequisites are French 3 and a course in French Literature, but exemp- 
tion from the latter may be granted to well qualified students interested primarily 
in the language. 



Romance Languages 85 

16b. French Literature through the Sixteenth Century. 

Lectures with collateral reading and reports on the history of French Literature. 
[Not offered in 1943-44.] 

17a. French Literatiire of the Seventeenth Century. 

Reading, reports and discussion of the main currents of thought and the out- 
standing literary figures of the century. 
[Not ofTered in 1943-44.] 

18b. French Literature of the Eighteenth Century. — Mr. H. Comfort. 

Reading, reports and discussion of the main currents of thought and the out- 
standing literary figures of the century. 

19a. French Literature of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries. — Mr. 
H. Comfort. 

Reading, reports and discussion of the main currents of thought and the out- 
standing literary figures of the century. 

Spanish 
Major Requirements. 

Spanish 3, 4a, 4b, Sa, 6b, 7. 

History of Spain and Spanish America, as a background for literature. 
Supporting courses in the Latin, French, Italian and English languages and 
literatures. History of Art, Philosophy: to be arranged in individual conference. 
Written and/or oral comprehensive examinations. 

1. Elementary Spanish. — Mr. Norton. 

Oral and written introduction to the Spanish language. 

2. Intermediate Elementary Spanish. — Mr. Asensio. 

A continuation of the work of Spanish 1 , with additional emphasis on reading. 

3. Advanced Spanish Conversation and Composition. — Mrs. Asensio. 

Normal prerequisites are Spanish 2 and a course in Spanish Literature, but 
exemption from the latter may be granted to well qualified students interested 
primaraily in the language. 

4a. Introduction to Spanish Literature from its origins. 

Lectures, reading, written and oral reports. 
[Not offered in 1943-44.] 

4b. Introduction to Spanish-American Literature. 

Lectures, reading, written and oral reports. 
[Not offered iji 1943-44.] 

5a. Spanish Literature of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries. 

Romanticism in Spam; the Movement of '98. Lectures, reports and discussions. 
[Not offered in 1943-44.] 

6b. Spanish Literature of the Golden Age. 

Cervantes, Lope de Vega, Tirso, Calder6n. 
[Not offered in 1943-44.] 

7. Special Topics in Spanish Literature. 

[Not offered in 1943-44.] 



86 Haverford College 

Italian 

1. Elementary Italian. — Mr. H. Comfort. 

Oral and written introduction to the Italian Language. Not open to Fresh- 
men. 

[Not offered in 1943^4.] 

2. Readings in Italian Literature. 

The Divina Commedia and other Italian classics. 
[Not offered in 1943-44.] 

SOCIOLOGY 

The courses in Sociology are designed to prepare students for 
citizenship in a democracy. Most, if not all, of our problems are at 
bottom traceable to faulty relationships between people and be- 
tween groups of people. Hence Sociology as the "Science of human 
relations" aims to throw light on the relationship of the individual 
to the group; of group to group; and of group to community. 

Sociology, furthermore, analyzes problems of social maladjust- 
ment, such as crime, poverty, and the breakdown of family life, 
which call for intelligent social action if community life is to be the 
matrix from which good citizenship is born. 

Major Requirements 

Six half-year courses in Sociology. 

Six other half-year courses or their equivalent, chosen from the following: 
Biology 7, Philosophy la, Philosophy 2b, Government 1, Government 3, Eco- 
nomics 1 and Mathematics 13a, in consultation with the major supervisor. 

Additional selected readings covering a special field in Sociology. 

A four-hour comprehensive examination covering the field of Sociology and 
related courses. 

A three-hour examination, written or oral or both, covering a special field in 
Sociology chosen by the student. 

For graduate students majoring in Sociology, Mathematics 13a (Introduction 
to Statistics) and Mathematics 14b (Advanced Statistics) may be counted as 
courses in Sociology. 

la. An Introduction to Sociology. — Mr. Watson. 

This course is an introduction to the scientific study of society. Its purpose is 
to study (1) those social forces and social processes whereby original nature is 
transformed into human nature, and (2) a description of the social organization 
man has evolved and the interaction between it and himself. 

2b. Criminology. — Mr. Watson. 

Social origins of crime and criminals; costs to the community and society; 
apprehension and rehabilitation of offenders; police organization; the courts in 
operation; penology including the probation and parole systems. Trips to penal 
institutions and the criminal courts will be made. Prerequisite, Sociology la, 

4b. Ethmic Relations. — Mr. Watson. 

A study of "racial" and cultured factors in American communities. Special 
attention will be paid to the Negro, the Oriental immigrant, and the American 
Indian. The particular cultured contributions of various minority groups are ex- 



Graduate Training 87 

plored, and methods of resolving conflicts between groups are examined. Pre- 
requisite, Sociology la. 
[Not offered in 1943-44.] 

5a. Industry and Society. — Mr. Watson. 

A sociological appraisal of modern industrialism. The course includes a detailed 
study of certain social problems, such as unemployment, and other forms of 
economic insecurity. 

Special emphasis is placed on methods of resolving industrial conflict. Studies of 
actual cases before the National War Labor Board are made with the view of 
discovering sound principles of labor management relations. Prerequisite, Eco- 
nomics 1. 

Also called Economics 5a. 

6b. Labor Policies and Business Management. — Mr. Pancoast. 

Particular problem areas in collective bargaining will be examined. Immediate 
effects on groups directly involved are distinguished from long-run consequences 
to society. Restraints of trade arising out of the employment relationship are 
analyzed as to their economic effects, particularly on "full" employment. Pre- 
requisite, Sociology 5a or Economics 11a. 

[Not offered in 1943-44.] 

7a. Seminar in Social Science Research. — First half-year. Mr. Pancoast and 
Mr. Watson. 

The seminar aims to acquaint the student with the general methods of research 
in the social sciences and their interrelations. It lays a foundation for the prepara- 
tion of M.A. theses and longer term papers involving social science research 
techniques. 

Classes limited to men majoring in one of the social sciences. Prerequisite, 
one two-term course or two one-term courses in any of the social sciences. 

[Not offered in 1943^4.] 

8b. Problems of the Modem Family. — Mr. Watson. 

A seminar course on problems of the modem family and education for parent- 
hood. A discussion of relationships of husband-wife; parent-child; and family- 
community. The emphasis throughout is on factors making for normal family 
life and successful adjustment thereto. Restricted to a limited number of upper 
classmen or graduate students. Apply in advance. Prerequisite, Sociology la. 

9a. The Field of Social Work.— Mr. Watson. 

A course of twenty-four lectures beginning in January 1944, running for six 
months. The course will place special emphasis on the principles and technique of 
social case work. Restricted to students in the Relief and Reconstruction unit in 
Haverford College. 

Sociology la and 2b were offered in the summer of 1943. 

GRADUATE TRAINING IN RECONSTRUCTION AND 

RELIEF 

{See Special Section under Graduate Students, p. 32) 

The course is run on the quarter system. Autumn quarter, 1943; 
Sept. 27-Dec. 18. Winter quarter, 1944: Jan. 3-lVIar. 24. Spring 
quarter, 1944: April 2-June 15. Summer Field Work quarter, 1944: 
June 22-Sept. 18. Autumn quarter, 1944: Sept. 25-Dec. 22. 

Students will be expected to take four courses per quarter. For 
the first three quarters all students who are not fluent in two 



88 Haverford College 

European languages will take two of their four courses in lan- 
guages. German will be spoken in the resident dormitory and at 
meals. 

Sample Program of Studies in 
Graduate Course of Reconstruction and Relief Follows. 

First quarter: Double course in Elementary German, or a single course in Ad- 
vanced German and a course in Polish; Philosophy & Practice of Reconstruction; 
Special Area Study. 

Second quarter: Continuation of double course in Elementary German or con- 
tinuation of Advanced German and Polish ; six weeksof Social Case Work and initial 
six weeks of sixteen weeks of International Relief Administration; Special Area 
Study, etc. 

German 1. R & R (Elementary German) — Mr. Kelly. 

An intensive double course in German designed to take those who have had 
either no German language study or those with limited study and prepare them 
for a command of spoken German. 

German 2. (Intermediate German) — Mr. Kelly. See German 2. 

German 3. (Advanced German) — Mr. Pfund. See German 3. 

Polish 1. — Miss Wankowicz. 

An elementary course to prepare for facility in spoken Polish. 

Swedish 1. — Mr. Stokes. 

An elementary grounding in the Swedish language. 

Russian 1. — Mr. Swan. 

Elementary study of the Russian language. 

Advanced French "1 

Advanced Italian \See courses in these departments. 

Advanced Spanish] 

Special Area Study. — Messrs. Stinnes, Chamberlin, Steere, Pfund and 
others. 

An intensive study designed to acquaint future reconstruction workers with 
some of the characteristic features of Central and Northern European social and 
economic life, and with the mentality and character of the people of these areas. 

Autumn quarter: Germany; winter quarter: Germany, Poland, Czechoslovakia, 
(Russia); springquarter: Scandinavia and Baltic states. 

Lectures by distinguished nationals of each country studied: Bruening, Ulich, 
Stresemann, Sollman, Rauschning, Segal, Brun, Kohlemainen, Elsa Brandstrom 
have spoken in this series; papers, journal club, and discussions. 

Philosophy and Practice of Reconstruction. — Autumn quarter, Mr. Steere 
and others. 

This course falls into two parts. The first is a series of lectures and biographical 
readings on great humanitarians in an effort to discover the sources of their power 
and to study the evolution of charitable services through the contributions of 
notable figures such as, Francis of Assisi, Vincent de Paul, John Woolman, John 
Frederic Oberlin, Florence Nightingale, Henri Dunant, Jane Addams, Matilda 
Wrede, Albert Schweitzer, and Fridtjof Nansen. 

The second part is a weekly conference with a distinguished administrator or 
field worker of the American Friends Service Committee in order to study in- 
tensively the scope and method of operation of a single reconstruction agency; 
Rufus Jones, Clarence Pickett, John Rich, Leslie Heath, J. Henry Scattergood, 
Alfred G. Scattergood, William Comfort, Howard Comfort, Hertha Kraus, Emily 
Parker Simon, Emma Cadbury, Josiah Marvel and Roger Wilson have spoken in 
this series. 



Graduate Training 89 

Social Case Work. — Four hours weekly to be arranged, winter quarter, 1944 
(one-half quarter). Mr. Watson. 

A concentrated course in social case work presented with special emphasis upon 
the features transferable to foreign reconstruction situations. Lectures and field 
trips. 

International Relief Administration. — Four hours weekly to be arranged, 
winter and spring quarters (one and one-half quarters). Dr. Hertha Kraus. 

A lecture and seminar course designed to acquaint the student with some back- 
ground of the existing European social welfare facilities; with the principles and 
practices of the major types of relief and reconstruction work that have been 
carried on in Europe; and with the policies of the leading relief and reconstruction 
agencies in this country. Representatives of these agencies will be mvited to dis- 
cuss their policies with members of the seminar. Lectures, research projects, 
discussions. 

Bookkeeping and Accounting. — Four hours weekly to be arranged, autumn 
quarter (one-half quarter). Mr. Teaf. 

This course is to acquaint future workers with the elements of bookkeeping and 
accounting practices and will use record systems of leading relief agencies in its 
problems. 

Elementary Nutrition. — Four hours weekly to be arranged, autumn quarter 
(one-half quarter). 

An orientation in basic principles of nutrition, with special reference to such 
problems as dietary analysis, supplementary feeding, and mass feeding involved 
in foreign relief operations. 

Elementary Village Hygiene.— Four hours weekly to be arranged, autumn 
quarter (one-half quarter). 

A survey of standard emergency practices in disposal of waste, purification of 
water, control of disease carriers, epidemic prevention and control, etc. 

Mental Hygiene of the Relief Worker. — Four hours weekly to be arranged, 
autumn quarter (one-half quarter). Mr. Steere. 

A study of the common personal problems faced by the relief worker in the 
field with attention directed to the psychological and spiritual resources available 
for a creative adjustment to the situation. 

Work Camp Administration. — Four hours weekly to be arranged, autumn 
quarter (one-half quarter). Messrs. Steere, Miller, Schnitzer, Jackson, 
Morris. 

A survey of the history and practice of work camps, with particular emphasis 
upon the application of past experience to international labor services in the post- 
war period. 

The Post-War World. — See Government 18b. 

Applied Work. 

In addition to carrying four of the above courses per quarter, each student will 
be assigned to some type of applied work. In the autumn quarter of 1943 the group 
were divided into units to work on one of four projects: (1) Apprenticeship to the 
American Friends Service Committee two afternoons a week (2) Apprenticeship 
to the week-end work camps under the directions of David and Mary Richie for 
four successive week-ends (3) Auto mechanics (4) Craft skills (carpentry, painting, 
toy-making, etc.). 

Field Work Projects. 

In the summer quarter all students will be assigned to a three months period 
of field work to be chosen from projects such as volunteer work camps, migratory 
workers camps, U. S. Employment Service, Travelers Aid, etc., after a careful 
study of the students' skills and needs. 



DEGREES, PRIZES, AND HONORS 
GRANTED IN 1942-1943 

Degrees 

The following degrees were conferred on Commencement Day, 
January 30, 1943 

BACHELORS OF ARTS 



Eugene Edwin Anderson, Jr. 
Marvin Luther Brown, Jr. 
David Allen Coolidge 
John Jacob Enck 
Edmund Jennings Lee 
Leon Levintow 
Robert MacCrate 



John Martin Moon 
George Foxcroft Morse 
Kenedon Potter Steins 
James Smyrl Sutterlin 
Haskell Torrence 
William Thomas Warren, Jr. 
Whitney Seiler Yeaple 



As of 1942 
David Clark Thompson 

BACHELORS OF SCIENCE 



John Malone Allen 
Arthur Hallock Bell 
Jared Spencer Brown 
Christopher Joel Cadbury 
Tristram Potter Coffin 
Jeff Dewald 

Thomas Hooper Eckfeldt, HI 
Joseph Morris Evans 
Sumner Wright Ferris 
James Bryson Gilbert 
William Leon Grala, Jr. 
Douglas Roberts Hallett 
John Fitz Hill 
Holland Hunter 
Lewis Crossett Kibbee 
David Blackburn Kirk 
Horace Mather Lippincott, Jr. 
Ellis Frank Little 

William 



John Crespi Marsh 
AvREL Mason 
John Hoyt Meader 
Sterling Newell, Jr. 
Frank Kellett Otto 
Richard Alexander Patton, Jr. 
Stuart Longfellow Ridgway 
George Magnus Ryrie 
William F. Shihadeh 
John Giffin Shinn 
John Dickinson Stevens, Jr. 
Ezra Clarke Stiles, Jr. 
William Allen Studwell 
Alexander C. Tomlinson, Jr. 
John Cunningham Whitehead 
Carl Eddington Widney 
John Ball Wilkie 
William Noble Wingerd 
Hoyt Woodward 



As of 1942 

John Denney Farquhar 
John Bernard Flick, Jr. 
David Sharpless Fox 
Edward Arnold Gaensler 
George Campbell Lewis, Jr. 
Clyde Kingsley Nichols, Jr. 
George Thomas Warner 



The following degrees were conferred on Commencement Day, 
June 5, 1943. 

DOCTOR OF LETTERS 

William Henry Chamberlin, '17 

90 



Degrees 

MASTER OF ARTS 

William Queally Hale (A.B., Earlham College, 1942) 

Thesis: The Japanese-American Student Evacuation and Relocation 

MASTERS OF SCIENCE 

Jonathan Stanton Dixon (B.S., Univ. of New Hampshire, 1942) 
Thesis: Oximes and Their Application as Analytical Reagents 

Arthur Nelson Wrigley (A.B., Haverford College, 1937) 
Thesis: A Study of Cryoscopic Constants 



91 



Henry Elwell Funk 



BACHELORS OF ARTS 

Norman Peterkin 



BACHELORS OF SCIENCE 



Cassin Winchester Craig 
Harry Schellman Hall 
Byron Edward Howe, Jr. 
Russell Marsh Lyman 



John Wendell Sevringhaus 
Seth Thixton Shepard 
David Delano Somers 
Albert Edward Turner, III 



Hugh Roberts Williams 

As of 1940 
Bruce Douglas Anderton 

The following degrees were conferred on Commencement Day, 
August 28, 1943. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE 

Robert Eline Halter (A.B., Gettysburg College, 1942) 

Thesis: The Use of Phenylhydrazine for Characterization of Esters 

BACHELORS OF ARTS 

Robert Briggs Day Robert Morrison Jacob 

Edward Burroughs Irving, Jr. Daniel Keller Miller 

Samuel Emlen Stokes, Jr. 



BACHELORS OF SCIENCE 



Cornelius Webster Abbott, of J. 

Donald Heston Baird 

John Lloyd Balderston, Jr. 

Louis Paul Bolgiano, Jr. 

Archie Girard Buyers 

William Kerr Conn 

Elmer Hendricks Funk, Jr. 

Henry Hamilton Gray 

Jesse Gyger Grier 

James Coke Haden 

Edmund Emerson Hammond, Jr. 

Walter Hollander, Jr. 

John Talcott Hough 

William McClelland Houston 



George Walter Hubler 
Robert Fairles Jordan 
John Sharpless Klein 
John McLaughlin Krom 
Gilbert Henry Moore, Jr. 
John Baird Roesler 
Harry Royer Smith, Jr. 
David Evans Stokes 
Henry Craig Sutton, Jr. 
Charles Edgar Thomas, Jr. 
Henry Sabau Vila 
Richard Hardin Warren 
Howard Page Wood 
James Howard Worl 



Clementine Cope Fellowship for 1943-1944 
Holland Hunter, 1943 



92 Haverford College 

Corporation Scholarships for the Summer Term, 1943 

5-6 Semesters 
Richard Wallace Cole Manuel Joseph Gomez 

3-4 Semesters 

Stanley Sherman Burns, Jr. John Howard Benge 

Anson Bixler Good 

J-2 Semesters 
Arthur Earl Bryson, Jr. 

Entering Class 
Jacob Andrews Longacre Peter Goldthwait Bennett 



Corporation Scholarships for the Fall Term, 
1943-1944 

5-6 Semesters 
Richard Wallace Cole Masamori Kojima 

Edward Block William L. Lehmann 

3-4 Semesters 
Stanley Sherman Burns, Jr. Robert Haig Bedrossian 

Arthur Earl Bryson, Jr. Lewis Edward Coffin 

1-2 Semesters 
Cloyd Marvin Thomas Paton Goodman 

Jacob Andrews Longacre Hans Eberhard Petersen 

Entering Class 
Ian Huebsch Roger Bacon 

Gerald Connof Gross, Jr. Howard Warner Starkweather, Jr. 



PRIZES 

The Class of 1896 Prizes ($20 in books) in Latin and in Mathematics 

for Sophomores have been awarded as follows: 

Latin ($10) — Henry Fillmore Lankford, 1945 

Mathematics ($10) — Geert Caleb E. Prins, 1945 

The Lyman Beecher Hall Prize in Chemistry 

($100 from Endowment by the Class of 1898) 

for Juniors, Seniors or Graduates within three years of graduation 

who expect to engage in research has been divided between 

Donald Heston Baird, 1944 

Edmond Emerson Hammond, 1944 

The Class of 1902 Prize in Latin {$10 in books) for Freshmen 
has been awarded to 
Hans Eberhard Petersen, 1946 

The Mathematics Department Prizes {$25 for Freshmen) awarded in 

competition by examination, have been awarded to 

First Prize ($15) — Thomas Paton Goodman, 1946 

Second Prize ($10) — William Edgar Cowan, 1946 



Prizes 93 

The Scholarship Improvement Prizes ($95) for the two Seniors who have 

shown the most steady and marked improvement in scholarship 

during the college course have been awarded as follows: 

First Prize ($50) — Sterling Newell, Jr., 1943 

Second Prize ($45) — John Crespi Marsh, 1943 

The Logan Pear sail Smith Prize {$50 in books) for that member of the 

Senior Class who, in the opinion of the Committee on Prizes, Ao5 

the best personal library has been awarded to 

John Jacob Enck, 1943 

The Founders Club Prize {$25 in books) for the Freshman who has 

shown the best attitude toward college activities and scholastic work 

William Edwards Sherpick, 1946 

The George Peirce Memorial Prize in Chemistry or Mathematics {$25) 
offered exclusively for students who expect to engage in research 
has been divided between 

Archie Girard Buyers, 1944 
Daniel Keller Miller, 1944 

The Alumni Oratorical Prizes ($25) each for Seniors and Juniors: 
David Yi-Yung Hsia, 1945 Charles Spahr Sangree, 1946 

The William Ellis Scull Prize {$50) awarded annually to the upper classman showing 

the greatest achievement in voice and the articulation of the English Language, 

has been awarded to 

Edward Burroughs Irving, Jr., 1944 

The Newton Prize in English Literature {$50) on the Basis of Final 

Honors, has been awarded to 

John Jacob Enck, 1943 



HONOR SOCIETIES 

The following members of the Class of 1943 were elected to the Phi 
Beta Kappa Society 

At the end of the Junior Year 
Edward Arnold Gaensler Stuart Longfellow Ridgway 

Holland Hunter Eugene Edwin Anderson, Jr. 

At the end of the Senior Year 
James Smyrl Sutteri,in Haskell Torrence 

John Jacob Enck Kenedon Potter Steins 

John Cunningham Whitehead Robert MacCrate 

Carl Edington Widney, Jr. David Allen Coolidge 

The following members of the class of 1944 were elected to the 
Phi Beta Kappa Society 

At the end of the Junior Year 

John Arthur Frantz Ellsworth Chapman Alvord, Jr. 

Robert Briggs Day Walter Hollander, Jr. 

Donald Heston Baird Daniel Keller Miller 

At the end of the Senior Year 
Cassin Winchester Craig 



94 Haverford College 

The following Seniors were elected to the Founders Club, an organization 
based on merit in both studies and college activities: 

During the Junior Year 

Haskell Torrence Robert MacCrate 

Paul Markley Cope, Jr. John Cunningham Whitehead 

H. Mather Lippincott, Jr. Tristram Potter Coffin 

Donald Heston Baird Charles Edwin Fox. Jr. 

Jodie Dee Crabtree, Jr. William Leonard Hedges 

Robert Briggs Day Richard Hardin Warren 

Daniel Elias Davis, Jr. Howard Page Wood 

J. Morris Evans 

During the Senior Year 

Eugene Edwin Anderson, Jr. David Allen Coolidge 

Edward Burroughs Irving, Jr. Robert Fairles Jordan 

Edmund Jennings Lee John Wendell Sevringhaus 

The following Juniors were elected to the Founders Club 

John Richard Cary Robert Gilmore Pontius 

David Yi-Yung Hsia Edward Preston, IH 

Stagey Harrison Widdicombe, Jr. 



HONORS 

FINAL HONORS 

Including Honors, High Honors, and Highest Honors awarded upon graduation, 
and by vote of the Faculty on recommendation of a department or group of re- 
lated departments. Awarded only to students whose work has been more pro- 
found in a given field, or more extensive in scope, than the minimum required, 
and who have fulfilled all the requirements for Final Honors in their respective 
Major Departments. 

Highest Honors 

January 

John Jacob Enck, 1943 English 

Stuart Longfellow Ridgway, 1943 Mathematics 

August 

Edmond Emerson Hammond, Jr., 1944 Chemistry 

Samuel Emlen Stokes, Jr., 1944 French 

High Honors 

January 

Eugene Edwin Anderson, Jr., 1943 Latin 

Holland Hunter, 1943 Economics 

Robert MacCrate, 1943 Government 

Kenedon Potter Steins, 1943 Government 

Haskell Torrence, 1943 Chemistry 

June 
Cassin Winchester Craig, 1944 Economics 



Honors 95 

Honors 

January 

Tristram Potter Coffin, 1934 English 

Jeff Dewald, 1943 Chemistry 

John Arthur Frantz, 1944 Chemistry 

James Smyrl Sutterlin, 1943 French 

August 

Archie Girard Buyers, 1944 Chemistry 

Robert Briggs Day, 1944 Physics 

Edward Burroughs Irving, Jr., 1944 English 

Daniel Keller Miller, 1944 Chemistry 

Howard Page Wood, 1944 Philosophy 

PRELIMINARY HONORS 

In Departments 
In the Sophomore or Junior Year 
Representing a minimum of 120 hours of Honors Work in addition to that required 
for two or more scheduled courses of two terms each of the Department, plus 
grades of 85, or better, for the present year in the Department indicated. 

January 
Daniel Elias Davis, Jr., 1944 Government 

June 
David Yi-Yung Hsia, 193r Chemistry 

HONORABLE MENTION 
In Single Courses in the Freshman or Sophomore Year 
Representing a minimum of 60 hours of Honors work in addition to that required 
for the course named, plus a grade of 85 or better, in the same course. 

June 

Elwood Tate Baker, 1946 Latin 5a, 6b 

Lewis Edward Coffin, 1946 Chemistry 1 

John Philip Feil, 1946 Chemistry 1 

Thomas Paton Goodman, 1946 Mathematics 1 

Walter Yoneo Kato, 1946 Engineering la, 2b 

Thomas Wilson Meldrum, 1946 Chemistry 2 

William Edwards Sherpick, 1946 Chemistry 1 

August 

John Philip Feil, 1946 English 2b 

William Houston Chartener, 1946 English 2b 

Llewellyn Powers Young, 1945 Economics 1 



DIRECTORY 

STUDENTS IN THE COLLEGE 

In the last column is given the number of the student's dormi- 
tory room; F for Founders Hall, Gov. H. for Government House, 
Lg. H. for Language House, M for Merion, S for Science House, 
D for day student. The field of major concentration is indicated 
in parentheses. The figure following the name indicates the num- 
ber of the term now being completed. 

Graduate Students 

Name Home Address College Address 

Palmer, Arthur Walden (English) D 

Haverford School, Haverford, Pa. 

Street, John Lyle (Chemistry) D 

R 2 Mabel, Minn. 
Wylie, Laurence William (R&R) Gov, H. 

8 College Lane, Haverford, Pa. 

Undergraduate Students 
A 

Name Home Address College Addres 

Alford, Theodore Crandall, Jr. 7 (Chemistry) 8 S 

Theoford Farm, McLean, Va. 

Annesley, William Honeyford, Jr. 3 109 M 

4667 Leiper Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Arnett, John Hancock, Jr. 2 17 M 

6200 Ardleigh Street, Germantown, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Atkinson, Anna Margaret (R&R) D 

Wrightstown, Pa. 

B 

Bacon, Roger 1 4M 

3307 Clarendon Road, Cleveland Heights, Ohio 

Barclay, Mary (R&R) Lg. H. 

424 N. Bluff, Wichita, Kan. 

Bartlett, Frederick Henry, Jr. 5 (Chemistry) 13 S 

15 S. Somerset Avenue., Ventnor City, N. J. 

Bedrossian, Robert Haig 5 (Chemistry) 8 S 

4501 State Road, Drexel Hill, Pa. 

Benge, John H. 6 (Chemistry) 8 S 

237 Washington Street, Kennett Square, Pa. 

Bennett, Peter Goldthwait 2 c/o Mr. Snyder 

82 Washington Street, Wellesley Hills, Mass. 

Birdsall, Thomas Morrison S (Chemistry) 13 S 

139 Booth Lane, Haverford, Pa. 

Blake, Frederick Leighton 1 101 M 

214 W. Hillcrest Avenue, Upper Darby, Pa. 

Block, Edward 6 (Physics) 23 F 

810 W. Sedgwick Street, Mt. Airy, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Brooks, Charlotte Hallowell (R&R) Lg. H. 

45 Mystic Street, West Medford, Mass. 

96 



Directory 97 

Name Home Address College Address 

Brown, Rodman Weld 2 106 M 

416 Linden Street, Wellesley Hills, Mass. 

Bryson, Arthur Earl, Jr. 4 102 M 

182 Myrtle Street, Winnetka, Illinois 

Buckley, James Coakley 2 17M 

620 Shadeland Avenue, Drexel Hill, Pa. 

Burns, Stanley Sherman, Jr. 5 (Chemistry) 13 S 

4603 Pershing Avenue, St. Louis, Mo. 

Bush-Brown, Albert 3 5F 

Quarry Farm, Ambler, Pa. 

C 

Calkins, Fay Gilkey (R&R) Lg. H. 

1112 N. Evergreen Street, Arlington, Va. 

Cameron, Angus Malcolm 4 M Pent. 

318— 8th Avenue, S. E., Minot, N. D. 

Cary, Sarah Comfort (R&R) Lg. H. 

EUet Lane and Wissahickon Ave., Mt. Airy 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Chapman, Samuel Hudson HI 2 IF 

227 Thompson Boulevard, Watertown, N. Y. 

Chartener, William Houston 5 4 Gov. H. 

414 Parkway, Monessen, Pa. 

Coffin, Lewis Edward 4 4F 

150 Church Street, Newton, Mass. 

Cole, Richard Wallace 7 (Physics) 16 F 

260 Case Avenue, Sharon, Pa. 

Cook, Edward Marshall, Jr. 4 D 

56 Cedarbrook Road, Ardmore, Pa. 

Cowan, William Edgar 4 IIM 

3220 Cove Road, Merchantville, N. J, 

Cunningham, Bjiadley HI 2 115 M 

3716 T Street, N. W., Washington, D. C. 

D 

Davis, Alan Marvin 2 3F 

205 W. 89th Street, New York, N. Y. 

DoANE, Robert Fay 3 12 M 

240 Tyson Avenue, Glenside, Pa. 

Doehlert, Charles Alfred, Jr. 3 Ill M 

55 Elizabeth Street, Pemberton, N. J. 

DoMiNcoviCH, Paul H. 5 18 F 

236 W. School Lane, Germantown, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Douglas, Deborah Adams (R&R) Lg. H. 

704 E. 44th Street, Savannah, Ga. 

Dowbinstein, Israel Morris 2 D 

3211 N. 17th Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Driscoll, Ruth Antoinette (R&R) 17 Railroad Ave. 

1629 Asbury Avenue, Evanston, 111. Haverford, Pa. 

Dyer, Kimball Decker 1 105 M 

14114 Grandmont Road, Detroit, Mich. 

E 

EcROYD, Henry 2 12F 

226 Lenoir Avenue, Wayne, Pa. 

Elkinton, Thomas 8 (Chemistry) D 

135 Rose Lane, Haverford, Pa. 

Estey, John S. 1 13 M 

70 W. 55th Street, New York, N. Y. 

Ewj;ll, Albert Hunter, Jr. 3 D 

4937 Walton Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa. 



98 Haverford College 

F 

Name Home Address College Address 

Fetterman, Henry Harter 7 (Chemistry) 8 S 

2608 Tilghman Street, AUentown, Pa. 

FowLE, Helen Joy (R&R) 5 College Circle 

Thetford, Vt. 

Fox, Samuel M., HI 7 (Chemistry) 3 S 

805 The Cambridge, Alden Park, Germantown, Philadelphia, Pa. 

G 

Garrison, Elizabeth Brosius (R&R) Lg. H. 

Holicong, Pa. 

Gildemeister, Maria Luisa (R&R) Lg. H. 

157 E. 72nd Street, New York City (temporary) 

GiNSBURG, Silas Jay 2 IIF 

5317 N. 16th Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Gold, Richard Louis 2 14 M 

2835 N. Lake Drive, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Gomez, Manuel J. 8 (Government) 6 Gov. H. 

6106 Callowhill Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Good, Robert Crocker 4 7F 

419 Homestead Avenue, Mount Vernon, N. Y. 

Goodman, Thomas Paton 3 17 F 

5533 University Avenue, Chicago, 111. 

Grant, David Evans 7 (Chemistry) 6 S 

207 E. Michigan Street, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Gregson, Earl Wesley 5 (Philosophy) D 

758 Beechwood Road, Beechwood, Upper Darby, Pa. 

Gross, Gerald Connop, Jr. 1 13 F 

4543 Grant Road, N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Gross, Sheldon Harley 4 UM 

Quarters 15a, Fort Myer, Va. 

H 

Harned, Ben King, Jr. 1 6 M 

3318 Queen Lane, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Hay, Stephen 1 D 

245 Ogden Avenue, Swarthmore, Pa. 

Henkels, Paul MacAllister, 114 D 

446 Church Lane, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Henne, John Kraffert 1 13 M 

332 W. Oak Street, Titusville, Pa. 

Hershey, John Eldon 1 8 Gov. H. 

809 Market Street, Lemoyne, Pa. 

Herter, Theophilus John 5 D 

232 Wendover Drive, Westgate Hills, Upper Darby, Pa. 

Higier, Theodore 2 6F 

160 Prospect Avenue, Gloversville, N. Y. 

HiLTNER, Theodore Martin 4 Gym 

4215 E. 33rd Street, Seattle, Wash. 

Holmes, Robert William 1 D 

720 Millbrook Lane, Haverford, Pa. 

Hood, George Morris Whiteside 2 6M 

3308 Warden Drive, Philadelphia, Pa. 

HsiA, David Y. 6 (Chemistry) 8 Gov. H. 

115 W. 73rd Street, New York, N.Y. 

HsiEH, Ho-Keng 1 7 Gov. H. 

c/o Y. Y. Hsu, 129 E. 52nd Street, New York, N. Y. 

HuEBSCH, Ian 1 9M 

285 Central Park West, New York, N. Y. 

HuLiNGS, Clark E. 7 (Physics) 6 S 

2639 Edward Avenue, Baton Rouge, La. 



Directory 99 

J 

Name Home Address College Address 

Jacobs, George Wayne, Jr. 3 8 F 

25 Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y. 

Johnson, David 2 2F 

18 W. 122nd Street, New York, N. Y. 

Jones, Annette Roberts (R&R) Lg. H. 

272 Vine Avenue, Highland Park, 111. 

K 

Katchen, Julius 2 21 F 

2 Hollywood Avenue, West Long Branch, N. J. 

Kato, Walter Yoneo 3 19 F 

41-5-D, Hunt, Idaho 

Kennedy, Francis Richard 3 30 F 

810 High Street, Paris, Ky. 

Kirk, Robert Louis 2 9F 

20 W. Baltimore Avenue, Media, Pa. 

Klein, Edwin Benedict, Jr. 2 5 M 

231 Bedford Road, Pleasantville, N. Y. 

Klein, Robert Anderson 2 1 16 M 

231 Bedford Road, Pleasantville, N. Y. 

Kojima, Masamori 6 (Government) D 

c/o Mrs. Wm. H. Collins, 757 College Avenue, Haverford, Pa. 

Kummel, Bertram Myron 4 30 F 

110 Mayhew Drive, South Orange, N. J. 

L 

Langston, Martha Porter (R&R) Lg. H, 

1275 Morada Place, Altadena, Calif. 

Lankford, Henry Fillmore 7 (History) 13 S 

69 Prince William Street, Princess Anne, Md. 

Leaman, Arthur 2 12 M 

330 Woodland Avenue, Westfield, N. J. 

Lehmann, William L. 7 (Physics) 7 F 

118 Redfield Place, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Lenton, Charles Trewartha 2 7M 

1725 N. Edgewood Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Leuchter, Ben 7ion 3 112 M 

E. Park Avenue, Vineland, N. J. 

LiBBY, John Kelway 4 110 M 

18 Cheston Avenue, Annapolis, Md. 

Long, Charles, 112 9Gov.H. 

1128 70th Avenue, Oak Lane, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Long, David E. 4 7 Gov.H. 

1522 Cleveland Avenue, N. W., Washington, D. C. 

LoNGACRE, Jacob Andrews 2 108 M 

115 N. Reading Avenue, Boyertown, Pa. 

M 

Manbeck, Harry Frederick, Jr. 2 7 M 

1403 Main Street, Honesdale, Pa. 

Mann, Philip C, 2nd 5 9S 

33 Church Street, Beverly, N. J. 

March, Robert 6 ' (Engineering) 7 S 

4303— 13th Street, N.E., Washington, D.C. 

Martin, Frank Ewart 1 10 S 

2626 Terrace Drive, Honolulu, Hawaii 

Marvin, Cloyd 3 10 F 

2601— 30th Street, N.W., Washington, D.C. 



100 Haverford College 

Name Home Address College Address 

McNeill, Donald Babbitt 4 6Gov.H. 

239 W. 8th Street, Erie, Pa. 

Meldrum, Donald N. 1 D 

747 College Avenue, Haverford, Pa. 

Montgomery, George, Jr. 5 (Chemistry) 5 S 

6124 Columbia Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa. 

MuENCH, James Frederick 2 9Gov.H. 

127 St. Paul Street, Westfield, N. J. 

MuMMA, James Fenninger 5 (Chemistry) 5 S 

101 Enterprise Avenue, Waynesboro, Pa. 

N 

Nicklin, George Leslie, Jr. 2 D 

2918 Berkley Road, Ardmore, Pa. 

Norton, Richard William, Jr. 6 D 

Haverford Court, Haverford, Pa. 

O 

Osuga, William M. 5 c/o Dr. Watson 

773 College Avenue, Haverford, Pa. 

P 

Page, Laurama (R&R) Lg. H, 

2424 Lincoln Street, Evanston, 111. 

Parker, John Hunter 1 103 M 

Columbia Pike, R. 2, Ellicott City, Md. 

Parkes, Robert Irving, Jr. 2 14 M 

87 Ivy Way, Port Washington, N. Y. 

Petersen, Hans Eberhard 3 107 M 

145— 95th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Plumb, Lois Virginia (R&R) Lg. H. 

20 Primrose Avenue, Tuckahoe, N. Y. 

Preston, Edmond, III6 (Chemistry) 3 S 

531 E. Tulpehocken Street, Germantown, Philadelphia, Pa. 

R 

Rawnsley, Howard Melody 2 104 M 

141 W. 10th Avenue, Conshohocken, Pa. 

Read, Michael Meredith 1 16 M 

634 S. Gramercy Place, Los Angeles, Calif. 

Rivers, Richard D. 3 9 Gov. H. 

1281 Everett Avenue, Louisville, Ky. 

Roche, Robert Pearson 2 5M 

109 Weyford Terrace, Garden City, L.I., N.Y 

Rogoff, Richard Caesar 4 15 F 

25 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Root, Vernon Metcalf 7 (Chemistry) 30 F 

Beekman Tower, 3 Mitchell Place, New York, N. Y. 

Ryan, Thomas Joseph 5 (English) 13 S 

1216 Lindale Avenue, Drexel Hill, Pa. 

Ryrie, Charles Caldwell 5 (Mathematics) 8 M 

1007 Henry Street, Alton, 111. 

S 

Sanders, Martin 1 2 Gov.H. 

55 Clinton Place, Bronx, New York, N. Y. 
Sangree, Charles Spahr 4 M Pent. 

103 Madison Street, Wellsville, N. Y. 

Schneider, Stewart Porterfield 4 8M 

14 Hathaway Lane, Verona, N. J. 



Directory 101 

Name Home Address College Address 

Scott, George Hubert 2 D 

Church of the Redeemer, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Seligsohn, Walter Israel 1 9F 

590 Fort Washington Avenue, New York, N. Y. 

Shearer, Charles Robert 1 D 

7528 Rogers Avenue, Highland Park, Del. Co., Pa. 

Sherpick, William Edwards 4 13 S 

430 E. 57th Street, New York, N. Y. 

Slotnick, Herbert Norman 6 (Chemistry) 13 S 

109 Crawford Avenue, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Smiley, Francis, Jr. 4 3 Gov. H. 

The Laurels, Mohonk Lake, N. Y. 

Smith, Gibson, Jr 10 

R. D. 6, York, Pa. 

Starkweather, Howard Warner, Jr 4 M 

815 Augusta Road, Wilmington, Del. 

Steefel, Lawrence D., Jr. 2 1 14 M 

2808 West River Road, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Stokes, Joseph, HI 5 M Pent. 

159 W. Coulter Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Stuart, John Walker 5 M Pent. 

30 E. 68th Street, New York, N. Y. 

Sturr, George Bowler Tullidge 2 10 Gov. H. 

129 Fourth Avenue, Haddon Heights, N. J. 

T 

Tanaka, Augustus Masashi 6 (Chemistry) 4 Gov.H- 

American Friends Service Committee, 20 S. 12th Street, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Taylor, Andrew Eustache 2 22 F 

3624 Van Ness Street, N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Taylor, Richard Clark 2 1 13 M 

3315 R Street, N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Thawley, Stanley B^evoort 4 20 F 

245 N. Somerset Avenue, Crisfield, Md. 

Thomson, Sydney Elise (R&R) Lg. H. 

38 Alexander Street, Princeton, N. J. 

Trainer, Mason 6 (Engineering) 7 S 

1368 Arlington Avenue, Columbus, Ohio 

Tuttle, Barbara Searles (R&R) Lg. H. 

202 E. Grove Street, Oneida, N. Y. 

W 

Walters, James Donald 1 22 F 

90 Brite Avenue, Scarsdale, N. Y. 

Wehmeyer, Jean Adele (R&R) Lg. H, 

R.F.D., Clinton Corners, N. Y. 

Whitehead, H. Macy 2 10 S 

424 Nuber Avenue, Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

WiLLAR, Edgar William, Jr. 8 (English) D 

140 Montgomery Avenue, Bala-Cynwyd, Pa. 

Williams, Mary Esther (R&R) Lg. H. 

1317 Bishop Road, Grosse Pointe, Mich. 

Wright, Daniel Ranney 1 22 F 

1422 Wyandotte Avenue, Lakewood, Ohio 

Wright, James Boyer 7 (Chemistry) 7 F 

7008 Wayne Avenue, Upper Darby, Pa. 

Wylie, Anne Stiles (R&R) Gov. H. 

270 Brookline Avenue, Boston, Mass. 

Z 

Zimmerman, Thomas C. 1 M Pent. 

719 Winans Way, Baltimore, Md. 



FACULTY AND OFFICERS 



Name 



Address 
(Haverford unless 
otherwise noted) 



Telephone 

(Ardmore Exchange 

unless otherwise noted) 



Allendoerfer, Carl B 750 

Asensio, Manuel J 2 

Babbitt, Dr. James A 

Benham, T. A 791 

Bernheimer, Richard M 225 

Caselli, Aldo 605 

Chamberlin, William H 22 

Comfort, Howard 5 

Comfort, William W 

Dodson, Leonidas 213 

Drake, Thomas E 702 

Evans, Arlington 324 

Evans, Francis Cope 1 

FitzGerald, Alan S 

Flight, John W 753 

Foss, Martin 824 

Frey, William T., Sr 428 

Gibb, Thomas C 518 

Green, Louis C 791 

Gummere, Henry V 3026 

Haddleton, A. W 29 

Henry, Howard K 1464 

Hepp, Maylon H 

Herndon, John G 1 

Hetzel, Theodore B 768 

Holmes, Clayton W 720 

Johnston, Robert J 

Jones, Rufus M 2 

Jones, Thomas 521 

Kelly, John A. 3 

Kikuchi, Chihiro 

Kirk, David B, 

Kraus, Alois 11 

LaflFord, Mrs. Lindsay 1-A 

LaFleur, Albert A 819 

LeGalley, Donald P 1 109 



Lockwood, Dean P. 
Lograsso, Angeline. 



Lunt, William E 5 

Macintosh, Archibald 3 

Meldrum, VVilliam B 747 

Morley, Felix 1 

Norton, Richard W 

Nova, Fritz 605 

Oakley, Cletus O 



W 



W 



Rugby Road, Bryn Mawr 

Bryn Mawr 2568 J 

College Lane 9163 

Tunbridge & Blakely Rds 7950 

College Ave 6044 

Roberts Rd., Bryn Mawr 

Bryn Mawr 1427 W 

Railroad Ave 1 133 

Holden St., Cambridge, Mass.. . 

College Circle 3732 

South Walton Rd 0455 

St. Marks Sq., Phila 

Evergreen 5028 

Pennstone Rd., Bryn Mawr 

Bryn Mawr 1534 

Blvd., Brookline, Upper Darby 

Hilltop 2043 

College Lane 4049 

Warick Rd. and Cotswold Lane, 

Wynnewood 1404 

College Ave 4409 

Buck Lane 1599 

Haverford Rd., Wynnewood . . . 7903 J 
W. Beechtree Lane, Wayne. . . . 

Wayne 1469 W 

College Ave 4409 J 

Midvale Ave., Phila. 29 

Tennessee 1933 

Tenmore Rd Bryn Mawr 1235 

Drayton Lane, Penn Wynne. . .3923 
Sugartown Rd. at Poplar Ave., 

Devon Wayne 0373 

College Lane 0364 

College Ave 4393 

Millbrook Lane 4269 

Woodside Cottage 3725 

College Circle 2777 

Panmure Rd. (Science House). .6769 W 

College Lane 4160 

Founders Hall, East 9460 

Founders Hall, East 9460 

Elliott Ave., Bryn Mawr 

Bryn Mawr 9277 

College Lane 5479 W 

Montgomery Ave., Bryn Mawr. 

Bryn Mawr 1502-R 

Yeadon Ave., Yeadon 

Madison 8555 W 

College Circle 1402 J 

College Inn, Bryn Mawr 

Bryn Mawr 9296 

College Lane 1507 W 

College Circle 0961 

College Aye 0881 J 

College Circle 4712 

Haverford Court 0947 

Railroad Ave 1132 

Featherbed Lane 3109 W 



102 



Directory 



103 



Address Telephone 

Name (Haverford unless (Ardmore Exchange 

otherwise noted) unless otherwise noted) 

Oberholtzer, Mrs. Beatrice 203 E. Evergreen Ave., Phila. 



Ohl, Raymond T 148 

Palmer, Frederic, Jr 7 

Pancoast, Omar, Jr 

Pepinsky, Abraham 

Pfund, Harry W 624 

Post, Amy L C-3 

Post, L. Arnold 9 



.Chestnut Hill 5847 

Cricket Ave., Ardmore 1381 

College Lane 7997 

ErskineHall 9627 

Founders Hall, East 6769 

Overhill Rd., Ardmore 5532 

Dreycott Apts 1643 

College Lane 0258 



W 

R 

W 

W 

M 



Rantz, J. Otto 2122 Chestnut Ave., Ardmore. 

Rittenhouse, Leon H 6 

Salomone, William 208 

Sargent, Ralph M 510 

Scaife, Mary L E-4 

Shudeman, Conrad L. B 

Snyder, Edward D 36 

Steere, Douglas V 739 

Stinnes, Edmund H 601 

Stokes, Samuel E., Jr 

Stone, Brinton H,. 774 

Sutton, Richard M 785 

Swan, Alfred J 3 

Taylor, Dr. Herbert W 457 

Teaf, Howard M., Jr 3 

Vedova, George C 1463 

Vittorini, D 1005 

Watson, Frank D 773 

Williamson, Alexander Jardine. . . 4 

Wills, William Mintzer B-201 

Wilson, Albert H 765 

Wylie, Laurence W 8 



College Lane 5522 

N. 65th St., Phila 

Railroad Ave 3339 

Haverford Gables 5117 

Founders Hall, East 9460 

Railroad Ave 0712 

College Ave 0162 

Walnut Lane 6759 

Founders Hall 9533 

Millbrook Lane 5555 

College Ave., (facingWalton Rd.) 0742W 

College Lane 1562 

Lancaster Ave 2383 

College Lane 4049 J 

Hampstead Rd., Penn Wynne. .3750 R 
Edgewood Rd., Brookline 

Hilltop 1417 J 

College Ave 2937 

College Lane 4023 

Merion Garden Apt., Merion. . . 

Merion 4760 

College Ave 1853 

College Lane 9613 



W 



MILITARY STAFF 
72nd A.A.F.T.T. Detachment — Basic Premeteorology Unit 
William G. Frey, A.C., 



Major 

Commandant 428 

1st Lt. Jack S. Cummings, A.C.. . 564 
2nd Lt. James E. Foscue, A.C. . . . 



Haverford Rd., Wynnewood. . .7903 

Montgomery Ave 

Apt. 107, Mermont Apts., Bryn 

Mawr Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

3327 Service Unit — Basic Engineering, Foreign Area and Language Studies 
Capt. Darryl W. Travis, Inf. Com- 



mandant 911 

J. Schiffler, 



2nd Lt. Edward 
A.U.S., Adjutant 



2nd Lt. Wesley R. McClanahan, 
A.U.S. Training 

2nd Lt. Herbert O. Carlson, 
A.U.S. Supply 31 

2nd Lt. John A. Clark, A.G.D., 
Classification 



Hagysford Rd., Pennvalley. . . . 

Cynwyd 0903 R 

S.W. Cor. New Gulph & Fishers 

Rd., Bryn Mawr 

Bryn Mawr 1493 M 

Founders Hall, East 6769 W 

S. Wyoming Ave., Ardmore 4031 

Woodside Cottage 3109 M 



104 Haverford College 

COLLEGE OFFICE AND BUILDING TELEPHONES 

Academic Directors: 

BE & PM Units, C. B. Allendoerfer 6400 

German A & L Unit, H. W. Pfund 6400 

Italian A & L Unit, H. Comfort 6400 

Admissions, Archibald Macintosh, Director 6400 

Alumni Office, Executive Secretary, Raymond T. Ohl 6400 

Army Air Forces Technical Training Command Office 3882 

Army Specialized Training Unit 4066 

Army Units, Academic Records Office 6400 

Assistant to the President, Brinton H. Stone 6400 

Barclay Hall, North: Army Premeteorology Unit 9506 

Barclay Hall, South: Army Premeteorology Unit 9508 

Barclay Hall, Center: Army Premeteorology Unit 9459 

Biology Laboratory (Sharpless Hall) 6400 

Business Office, W. M. Wills, Comptroller 6400 

Bucky Foundation Office 6400 

Chemistry Laboratory: W. B. Meldrum, T. O. Jones 6400 

Coordinator of Army Units and Dean of Military Students: H. M. Teaf, Jr.. .6400 

Dean's Office, Acting Dean, Thomas C. Gibb 6400 

Engineering Laboratory (Hilles) 6400 

Faculty Secretary 6400 

Founders Hall, East 9460 

Founders Hall, Dormitory 9533 

Government House 6400 

Gymnasium 6400 

Gymnasium (Pay Station) 9512 

Haverford News 6400 

Haverford Review, Raymond T. Ohl, Managing Editor 6400 

Hilles Laboratory of Applied Science (Engineering): Rittenhouse, Leon H., 

Hetzel, Theodore B., Holmes, Clayton W., Rantz, J. Otto 6400 

Infirmary 6400 

Kitchen 9544 

Language House 9428 

Library: D. P. Lockwood (Librarian), Amy L. Post, Elsa Lisle (Circulation 

Desk), Thomas E. Drake, Anna B. Hewitt (Treasure Room) 6400 

Lloyd Hall, 3rd Entry (Kinsey) 9520 

Lloyd Hall, 5th Entry (Strawbridge) 9514 

Lloyd Hall, 8th Entry (Leeds) 9628 

Merlon Hall 9458 

Merion Hall Annex 9630 

Observatory 6400 

Physics Laboratory (Sharpless Hall) 6400 

Power House 6400 

President, Felix Morley 6400 

Reconstruction and Relief Unit Office 6400 

Registrar, W. M. Wills 6400 

Research Laboratory, Alan S. FitzGerald, Director 5092 

Romance Languages Office 6400 

Science House (521 Panmure Road) 9523 

Secretary to the President, Mary L. Scaife 6400 

Sharpless Hall: Aldo Caselli, Howard Comfort, Francis C. Evans, Howard K. 
Henry, Albert A. La Fleur, Donald P. LeGalley, Frederic Palmer, Jr., 

Abraham Pepinsky, Richard M. Sutton 6400 

Steward, Richard Howell 6400 

Superintendent, R. J. Johnston 6400 

Vice President, Archibald Macintosh 6400 

Whitall Hall: John W. Flight, Maylon H. Hepp, John G. Herndon, John A. 
Kelly, William E. Lunt, Harry W. Pfund, Ralph M. Sargent, Edward D. 
Snyder, Douglas V. Steere, Howard M. Teaf, Jr., Frank D. Watson 6400 



GENERAL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION OF 
HAVERFORD COLLEGE 

President 

William K. Hartzell, '28 
Fidelity-Philadelphia Trust Bldg., Phila., Pa. 

Vice-Presidents 

Edward A. Edwards, '08 
Walnut Lane, Haverford, Pa. 

Joseph M. Beatty, Jr., '13 
308 Thornhill Road, Baltimore, Md. 

Robert C. Sullivan, '29 
25 Broadway, New York, N. Y. 

Executive Secretary 

Raymond T. Ohl, '21 
148 Cricket Ave., Ardmore, Pa. 

Treasurer 

Walter C. Baker, '32 
Girard Trust Co., Phila., Pa. 



Haverford Club of Philadelphia 
1607 Moravian St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

President I. Thomas Steere, '16 

Vice-President George W. Emlen, Jr., '08 

Secretary Walter C. Baker, '32 

Treasurer Arthur S. Roberts, '32 

Acting Treasurer Harris G. Haviland, '26 

New York Haverford Society 
President Geoffroy Billo, '25 

30 Broad St., New York, N. Y. 

Vice-President Oliver W. Melchoir, '28 

Junior High School, Scarsdale, N. Y. 

Secretary R. Wilfred Kelsey, '33 

60 East 42nd St., New York, N. Y. 

Treasurer Herbert F. Taylor, '28 

806 Pelhamdale Ave., New Rochelle, N. Y. 
105 



106 Haverford College 

Haverford Society of Maryland 

President Franklin O. Curtis, '26 

4412 Norwood Rd., Baltimore, Md. 

1st Vice-President Joseph M. Beatty, Jr., '13 

308 Thornhill Rd., Baltimore, Md. 

2nd Vice-President Alan S. Young, '11 

3743 Nortonia Rd., Baltimore, Md. 

Secretary William W. Saunders, '27 

4303 Kathland Ave., Baltimore, Md, 

Treasurer Howard O. Buffington, Jr., '31 

4805 Belle Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

Haverford Society of Washington 

President Charles R. Thompson, '27 

3556 Albemarle St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Vice-President Allan B. Fay, '27 

3 Ardmore Circle, Friendship Sta., D. C. 

Secretary-Treasurer Meredith B. Colket, Jr., '35 

2017 Eye St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Pittsburgh Alumni Association of Haverford College 

President Gifford K. Wright, '93 

First National Bank Building, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Secretary Willard E. Mead, '26 

5800 Walnut St., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Treasurer James M. Houston, '31 

1639 Beechwood Blvd., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Haverford Society of New England 
President Frank M. Eshleman, '00 

40 Broad St., Room 600, Boston, Mass. 

Vice-President Walter S. Hinchman, '00 

Milton, Mass. 

Vice-President Paul Jones, '05 

Marble St., Whitman, Mass. 

Treasurer Weston Howland, '17 

144 Randolph Ave., Milton, Mass. 

Secretary Richard W. Janney, '22 

22 Dwhinda Rd., Waban, Mass. 



INDEX 

PAGE 

Administration, Officers of 20 

Admission: 

Requirements for 22 

Information Concerning Examinations 23 

For Graduate Students 30 

Alumni Associations 105 

American Literature, Instruction in 67 

Archaeology (Near Eastern), Instruction in 57 

Art, Instruction in 55 

Astronomy, Instruction in 56 

Athletic Fields 80 

Autograph Collection, Charles Roberts 47 

Biblical Literature, Instruction in 57 

Biology, Instruction in 58 

Botany, Instruction in 59 

Calendar 2 

Chemistry, Instruction in 60 

Clubs. 50 

Committees: 

Of the Board of Managers 12 

Of the Faculty 21 

Corporation: 

Officers of 11 

Members of the Standing Nominating Committee of the 11 

Courses of Study 24 

Courses of Instruction 55 

Debating and Public Discussion 69 

Degrees: 

Awarded in 1942-43 90 

Bachelor's 30 

Master's 30 

Delinquent Students 39 

Description of Haverford College 7 

Directory 96 

Economics, Instruction in 62 

Employment Bureau 46 

Engineering, Instruction in 64 

English Language and Literature, Instruction in 67 

Ethics, Instruction in 79 

Examinations: 

For Admission 22 

For the Master's Degree 30 

Expenses 41 

Faculty 14 

Faculty, Standing Committees of 21 

Faculty, Residence and Telephone Directory 102 

Fellowships 45 

Holder of 91 

French, Instruction in 84 

Geography and Geology, Instruction in 69 

German, Instruction in 70 

Government, Instruction in 71 

Grading of Students 39 

Graduate Students: 

Admission, requirements, charges, courses 30 

107 



108 Haverford College 

Greek, Instruction in 

Gymnasium 

Hebrew, Instruction in 

History, Instruction in 

History of Haverford College 

Honor Societies, New Membership in 

Honor System 

Honors: 

Awarded in 1942^3 

Requirements for 

Infirmary, The Morris 

Italian, Instruction in 

Laboratory fees 

Latin, Instruction in 

Lectures 

Library 

Loan Fund 

Major Requirements 

Managers, Board of 

Mathematics, Instruction in 

Meeting, Friends 

Music, Instruction in 

Observatory 

Phi Beta Kappa Society 

Philosophy, Instruction in 

Physical Education 

Physics, Instruction in 

Prizes 

Prizes awarded in 1942-43 

Psychology, Instruction in 

Publications 

Required Courses 

Rooms 

Scholarships 

Corporation, Holders of 1943-44 

Sociology, Instruction in 

Societies 

Spanish, Instruction in 

Student Directory 

Teaching Fellowships , 

Telephone Directory , 

Tuition Charge 








I ii I « 

4 sl^^ 



CLASS OF 1923 
TENNIS COURTS 



CUSS OF 


1916 


ATHLETIC 


FIELD 




Map of 

Haverford College 

Grounds 



216ACR&$ 



Founders Hall 
Barclay Hall 
Roberts Hall 
Haverford Union 
Lloyd Hall 
Servants Dormitory 
Whitall Hall 
Chase Hall 
Observatory 
Morris Infirmary 
Mary Newlln Smith Memorial 
Garden 
The Library 

Lyman Bcecher Hall Chemistry 
Laboratory 
The Gymnasium 
Isaac Sharpless Hall (Archeol- 
ogy. Biology and Physios) 
Cricket Pavilion 
Power Housfi 

Walter E. Smith Grand Stand 
Farm Buildino* 
Government House 
Merlon Hall 
Merlon Annex 
Strawbrldge Gateway 
Edward B. Conklin 
Gateway 

Class or 1906 Gateway 
Class of 1912 Gateway 
George Smith Bard Gateway 



A. Kelly, 



104. 
105. 
106. 
107. 
108. 
109. 

no. 

Mi. 
112. 
113. 
114. 
IIS. 
116. 
117. 
118. 
119. 
120. 
121. 
122. 
123. 
125. 
126. 
127. 
129. 



Hilles Laboratory of Applied 

Science (Engineering) 

Class of 1905 Gateway 

Messrs. F. C. Evans. Herndon, 

Melchoir and Lafford 

Language House 

Messrs. Swann, J. 

and Teaf 

Mr. Williamson 

Mr. Lunt 

Mr. RIttenhouse 

Mr. Palmer 

Mr. Wyiie 

Mr. Post 

President Morley 

Mr. R. M. Jones 

Mr. Macintosh 

Mr. Peplnsky 

Mr. H. Comfort 

Mr. Lockwood 

Mr. Johnston 

President- Emeritus Comfort 

Mr. Reld 

Mr. Snyder 

Messrs. Benham and Graea 

Mr. Sutton 

Mr. Watson 

Mr. Wilson 

Mr. Flight 

Mr. Meldrum 

Mr. Steer* 

Mr. Oakley 



GEOKGE BANTA PUBLISHING COMPANY, MENASHA, WISCONSIN 



HAVERFORD 
COLLEGE 
BULLETIN 




REPORT of 
THE PRESIDENT of THE COLLEGE 

1942-43 



VOLUME XLII NUMBER FOUR 

FIRST MONTH, 1944 



ooaooaoooaaaoaoaaoooaooooaoaoooaooooooaaoaooaoooaoooooooooooooaoooaooooosaooooc 



THE CORPORATION OF 



HAVERFORD COLLEGE 

1943-1 944 




REPORT OF 
PRESIDENT of THE COLLEGE 

Revised to Twelfth Month 31, 1945 



HAVERFORD. ..PENNSYLVANIA 



CORPORATION of HAVERFORD COLLEGE 



OFFICERS 

Morris E. Leeds, President 4901 Stenton Ave., Germantown, Phila. 

Felix M. Morley, President of the College Haverford, Pa. 

J. Henry Scattergood, Treasurer 1616 Walnut St., Phila. 

John Flagg Gummere, Secretary W. School Lane and Fox Ave., Phila. 



MEMBERS of THE STANDING NOMINATING COMMITTEE 
of THE CORPORATION 

Term Expires 1944 

Stanley R. Yarnall 5337 Knox St., Germantown, Phila. 

Thomas Shipley Brown Westtown, Pa. 

C. Reed Cary Ellet Lane and Wissahickon Ave., Mt. Airy, Phila. 

Term Expires 1943 

William W. Comfort Haverford, Pa. 

LovETT Dewees Sweetwater Farm, Glen Mills, Pa. 

Theodore B. Hetzel 768 College Avenue, Haverford, P». 

Term Expires 1946 

Harris G. Haviland 16th and Race Sts., Phila. 

Archibald Macintosh 3 College Circle, Haverford, Pa. 

Jonathan M. Steere 1318 Girard Trust Bldg., Phila. 



THREE] 



BOARD OF MANAGERS 
1943-1944 

Ex-oFFicio AS Officers of Corporation 

Morris E. Leeds, President 4901 Stenton Ave., Phila. 

J. Henry Scattergood, Treasurer 161 6 Walnut Street, Phila. 

John Flagg Gummere, Secretary W. School Lane and Fox Ave., Phila. 

Term Expires 1944 

J. Stogdell Stokes Stokes and Smith Co., Summerdale, Phila. 

M. Albert Linton 46th and Market Sts., Phila. 

Francis R. Taylor 910 Girard Trust Bldg., Phila. 

Edward Woolman Haverford, Pa. 

Thomas W. Elkinton 121 So. 3rd St., Phila. 

Dr. S. Emlen Stokes Moorestown, N. J. 

Henry Carter Evans 635 Manatawna Ave., Roxboro, Phila. 

William M. Maier Bailey Building, Phila. 

Term Expires 1943 

Charles J. Rhoads Ithan Road, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Edward W. Evans 304 Arch St., Phila. 

William A. Battey Liberty Trust Building, Phila. 

Dr. Frederic C. Sharpless Rosemont, Pa. 

John A. Silver Olney P.O., Phila. 

Alfred Busselle 347 Madison Ave., New York, N. Y. 

Walter C. Janney 1529 Walnut St., Phila. 

William B. Bell Rockefeller Plaza, New York, N. Y. 

Term Expires 1946 

Frederic H. Strawbridge 801 Market St., Phila. 

Jonathan M. Steere 1318 Girard Trust Bldg., Phila. 

L. HoLLiNGSWORTH WooD 103 Park Ave., New York, N. Y. 

Stanley R. Yarnall 5337 Knox St., Germantown, Phila. 

William Wistar Comfort Haverford, Pa. 

Dr. Henry M. Thomas, Jr 1201 N. Calvert St., Baltimore, Md. 

Alexander C. Wood, Jr 511 Chestnut St., Phila. 

Harold Evans 1000 Provident Trust Bldg., Phila. 

Alumni Representatives 

John K. Garrigues, Term expires 1944 1102 Westover Road, 

Westover Hills, Wilmington, Del. 

Paul Van Reed Miller, Term expires 1945 Girard Trust Bldg., Phila. 

Owen B. Rhoads, Term expires 1943 Packard Bldg., Phila. 

William Nelson West, III, Term expires 1946. .1104 Stock Exchange Bldg., Phila. 

Faculty Representatives 

Term Expires 1944 Term Expires 1946 
Cletus O. Oakley D. P. Lockwood 

• • 

Chairman of Board Secretary of Board 

Morris E. Leeds Edward W. Evans 

[four 



HAVERFORD COLLEGE 

STANDING COMMITTEES of THE BOARD of MANAGERS 

of THE CORPORATION of HAVERFORD 

COLLEGE 



Executive Committee 
J. Stogdell Stokes, Chairman Walter C. Janney 

J. Henry Scattergood W. Nelson West, 3rd 

Jonathan M. Steere Dr. S. Emlen Stokes 

Alexander C. Wood, Jr. Thomas W. Elkinton 

Dr. Frederic C. Sharpless Paul V. R. Miller 



Committee on Finance and Investments 

Jonathan M. Steere, Chairman Dr. S. Emlen Stokes 

J. Henry Scattergood M. Albert Linton 

Alexander C. Wood, Jr. John K. Garrigues 

William B. Bell 



Committee on Audit and Accounts 

William A. Battey, Chairman William M. Maier 

Francis R. Taylor W. Nelson West, 3rd 

Harold Evans 

Committee on College Property and Farm 

Henry C. Evans, Chairman Edward Woolman 

Frederic H. Strawbridge Alfred Busselle 

Thomas W. Elkinton William M. Maier 

William A. Battey Owen B. Rhoads 

John A. Silver 

Committee on Honorary Degrees 

WiLLLAM W. Comfort, Chairman Stanley R. Yarnall 

L. Hollingsworth Wood Francis R. Taylor 

Dr. Henry M. Thomas, Jr. M. Albert Linton 



five] 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 



Felix M. Morley 

A.B., Haverford College; B.A., Oxford University; Ph.D., Brookings Institution; L.L.D., 
Hamilton College and University of Pennsylvania; Litt.D., George Washington University 

President 
Archibald Macintosh 

A.B., Haverford College; M.A., Columbia University 
Vice President, and Director of Admissions 

Thomas C. Gibb 

A.B., Dickinson College; A.M., Haverford College 
Acting Dean 

William Mintzer Wills 

A.B., A.M., Haverford College 
Comptroller and Registrar 

Dean Putnam Lockwood 

A.B., A.M., and Ph.D., Harvard University 
Librarian 

Robert J. Johnston 
Superintendent 

Herbert William Taylor 

A.B., Haverford College; M.D., University of Pennsylvania 
Physician in Charge 

Louis C. Green 

A.B. a.m., and Ph.D., Princeton University 
Director of the Strawbridge Memorial Observatory 

Thomas Edward Drake 

A.B., Stanford University; M.A., University of Michigan; Ph.D., Yale University 
Curator of the Quaker Collection 

Brinton H. Stone 

A.B., Johns Hopkins University; M.A., Columbia University 
Assistant to the President 

Richard Howell 
Steward 

Amy L. Post 

A.B., Earlham College 
Assistant Librarian 

Mabel S. Beard 

R.N., Lankenau Hospital 
Resident Nurse 

Mary L. Scaife 
Secretary to the President 

Note — For List of Faculty, see Catalogue 1943-1944 

[six 



REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT 

Presented at the 

Annual M.eeting of the Corporation 

of Haverford College^ 

October ipj 1943^ revised to January ij 1944 



T 



A DIFFICULT YEAR 

/- ]^ ^HE academic year 1942-43, reviewed herewith, was inevitably 
one of exceptional difficulty for all connected with Haverford 
College, particularly so in the case of those holding responsi- 
bility for policy and administration. 

Aside from the many day to day problems raised by the cumula- 
tive strains of total war, decisions affecting both the basic traditions 
and the continued existence of this Quaker institution were posed in 
inescapable form. Whether or not the course which has been chosen 
was under the circumstances the most desirable is a matter for indi- 
vidual judgment. The role of the President of the College is primar- 
ily to administer rather than to determine fundamental policy. But 
it is well within the scope of this report to express the opinion that 
Haverford, during the period under survey, confronted a crisis more 
serious than any since financial difficulties forced its closing, from 
the Fall of 1845 to the Spring of 1848. 

In my further opinion the continued operation and improvement 
of this small college is now definitely assured. Whatever the storms 
ahead, and unquestionably they will be severe, Haverford has been 
placed in condition to ride them out. 

seven] 



Reporting to this meeting last October, I remarked that "Mortality 
among colleges of the type of Haverford is to be expected if the war 
continues even another year. . , . The outlook is dark . . . for this 
small college which has so long striven to do its part for the building 
of a more fruitful individual and social life." 

It would not, a year ago, have been politic to enlarge on the mag- 
nitude of the strains which even then were apparent beneath the 
seemingly smooth surface of our campus life. 

In September, 1942, the College opened with an enrollment of 
329, as compared with 350 in 1941 and 338 in 1940. But from 
Roberts Hall it was evident that the normality apparently main- 
tained up to a year ago was deceptive. Early in November Congress 
lowered the draft age to 18 and soon afterwards, by conscription 
and voluntary enlistment, our enrollment began to decline at a rate 
which for a time averaged almost one student per diem. An unde- 
feated football team, together with our more customary excellence 
in soccer, did much to maintain undergraduate morale throughout 
the Fall. But from November on the adverse effect of the continu- 
ous student departures on the psychology of those remaining was 
obvious. An atmosphere of instability began to undermine all con- 
structive effort. 

Particularly disturbing was wartime faculty restlessness. While 
the proportion is higher than in the student body, very few of our 
teaching staff are pacifists in any absolutist sense. Several faculty 
members left for various forms of war service. Many others told me 
of their urgent desire to serve their country more actively than 
seemed possible in a college catering to a steadily dwindling num- 
ber of civilian students. Actual disintegration of a faculty which, as 
a whole, constitutes Haverford's chief claim to academic distinc- 
tion, began to loom as a probability. 

In the meantime, all efforts to establish civilian training units, in 
various forms of relief and reconstruction, broke down before the 
refusal of the Government to grant any measure of military defer- 
ment for enterprises of this character. It became steadily more ap- 
parent that the College must either give active cooperation in the 
war effort, or be prepared to close its doors. 

As an institution clearly "affected with a public interest," and ac- 

[ EIGHT 



cepting tax-exemption on that basis, it seemed to me that Haver- 
ford was under strong obligation to extend such cooperation, much 
as I had personally regretted our participation in the war. Further- 
more, the prospect of seeing Haverford become moribund, with the 
strong possibility that it would not later recover from that condition, 
was one that I was unwilling to contemplate in my capacity as 
President of the College. I had not come to Haverford, if I may 
venture to paraphrase Winston Churchill, in order to preside over 
its dissolution. 



II 

THE MILITARY UNITS 

The steps whereby Haverford College, on sanction of the Board 
of Managers, accepted a Pre-Meteorology Unit of the Army Air 
Forces Technical Training Command, are well known and have 
been set forth in detail in the Spring (1943) issue of The Haverford 
Review. 

For present purposes it is sufficient to note that the advent of this 
Unit, last February, while it has brought pangs of conscience as well 
as many wearying administrative problems in its train, has been in 
many respects of incalculable benefit to the College. I would men- 
tion first, the resultant stabilization and restoration of campus mo- 
rale; second, the sense of professional service rendered during a 
grave national emergency; third, the stim.ulus of new and provoca- 
tive educational problems and techniques; and lastly, the incidental 
property and administrative improvement which has resulted. On 
the subject of upkeep and maintenance your administration frankly 
admits the tonic effect of unadvertised military inspections directed 
to the single end of checking the efficiency, economy and cleanliness 
of our household arrangements. 

The Pre-Meteorology Unit, however, was assigned to us for only 
a year of training and, soon after its establishment, we learned that 
its replacement by the Army Air Forces cannot be expected. On the 
assumption that the war would be of long duration, it therefore be- 
came necessary to plan for the period after February, 1944. So far 
as the complexities and uncertainties of the situation allowed, all 

nine] 



such planning has been outlined in special memoranda to the Board 
of Managers as it developed, I would like at this point to empha- 
size my debt of gratitude to the Board for its sympathetic, patient 
and understanding attitude throughout this whole period of excep- 
tional difficulty and strain. 

In considering such further military units as might be available 
for Haverford, the first desideratum was obviously to preserve, so 
far as possible, the traditional balance of the College instruction. 
After much inquiry and patient negotiation we were fortunate to 
obtain, for the cycle of instruction starting September 13, 1943, a 
composite Army Specialized Training Program unit composed of 
140 Area and Language students, divided into Italian and German 
sections, plus 60 Basic Engineers. The latter are studying a predomi- 
nantly scientific curriculum, involving Chemistry as well as Physics 
and Mathematics. Out of this basic curriculum the Army Specialized 
Training Division may later develop the type of premedical unit not 
at present available. 

The Area and Language students will be at Haverford until June, 
1944, and there is no assurance that they will be replaced. The Basic 
group is similarly here for three 12-week terms, but at the end of 
each term will be augmented by an increment of 60, giving this unit 
a continuing strength of 180 from March, when the Pre-Meteorology 
Unit will have departed. 

So far as anything connected with the war program can be called 
certain, Haverford is thus assured of a minimum body of 180 Army 
trainees for the duration, calling for instruction in Mathematics, 
Physics, Chemistry, English, History, Geography and Mechanical 
Drawing. It is this arrangement which permits the optimistic belief 
that for this College as an educational institution the worst difficul- 
ties are over and the future is secure. But no outline summary can 
give any idea of the scope, complexity and difficulty of the problems 
with which all employes of the College have had to grapple during 
the past twelve months. 

The overlap between the P-M and the A.S.T.P. units, a circum- 
stance which could not be avoided if the latter were to be secured at 
all, has resulted in a current student load far greater than the College 
has ever handled heretofore. On September 21, when the academic 

[ten 



year 1943-44 opened, there were in residence 175 P-M trainees; 198 
A.S.T.P. trainees and 129 civilian students. To these numbers were 
added, on September 27, the 20 members of the women's Recon- 
struction and Relief unit now pursuing studies on the graduate level 
with a view to eventual participation in the social and spiritual re- 
building of Central Europe. Thus the College is at the present time 
instructing, housing and feeding a total of 522 students, almost 50 
per cent greater than the previous maximum enrollment, attained 
two years ago. 

This enlargement has been made possible in part by the less com- 
modious accommodations required by the Army students and in part 
by the three large residences, two on and one just off the campus, 
which, during the past three summers, have been successively con- 
verted to dormitory purposes. Thus all of the P-M unit is housed in 
Barclay Hall and all of the A.S.T.P. unit in Lloyd Hall, each of 
which normally accommodates only about half the men now living 
there. The R. and R. unit is centered in the Language House. The 
regular student body is divided between Founders (30); Merion 
Hall and Annex (43); Government House (14); Panmure Road 
House (22) and Day Students (20). Acquisition of the Panmure 
Road property, bought at public auction by the College on March 
6, 1943, for the relatively modest sum of $8500, has already proved 
a sound and far-sighted investment. 

The modernization and enlargement of the College kitchen, ac- 
complished in the Summer of 1941, has enabled us to cope with the 
feeding problem. At Haverford, as elsewhere, this has two main 
components — the difficulty of obtaining supplies and the difficulty 
of retaining help. The former issue is indirectly relieved by the serv- 
ices of the Army commissariat for military students and the latter 
has been partially met by a change to the cafeteria system of service, 
inaugurated at the opening of the present term. Meals are now 
served in three shifts — for the civilian students, the P-M unit and 
the A.S.T.P. unit. The R. and R. girls eat in the attractive waiters' 
dining room, the remodelling and renovation of which was part of 
the kitchen improvement undertaken in 1941. 

eleven} 



Ill 

EXTENSION OF PENSIONS PROPOSED 

Where so many have made such great exertion, any attempt at 
comparison would be invidious. Nevertheless it may be noted that 
the transition to present conditions could not have been made with 
as little confusion and upheaval as has been the case without the 
extraordinary service rendered by our Superintendent, Robert J. 
Johnston. No burden has been too difficult for Mr. Johnston to 
shoulder and not once has he even indicated that it might be be- 
yond his powers to resolve any emergency, regardless of the condi- 
tions on expenditure with which his authority has been circum- 
scribed. With the regretted resignation of Charles Clement as 
Steward, which became effective October 15, supervisory authority 
over the kitchen and dining room has been more strongly concen- 
trated in Mr. Johnston's hands. 

Similar tribute should be paid to William M. Wills, who as- 
sumed the office of Comptroller nearly two years ago. During this 
period he has endeavored to improve the rather primitive account- 
ing procedure of the College, an undertaking made easier by the 
unfailing cooperation of the Treasurer. The major objective in the 
establishment of the office of Comptroller was to provide the admin- 
istration with more complete and current information on the finan- 
cial position of the College, thus facilitating the maintenance of a 
balanced budget. While the additional duties placed on the Comp- 
troller's office by the advent of the Army and R. and R. units have 
been exacting, they have nevertheless been handled with energy. A 
result of the challenge has been a pronounced though still inade- 
quate improvement in the important if uninspiring fundamental 
of business management. 

Turnover among non-faculty employes is naturally high under war 
conditions, not only because of the draft but also because of Haver- 
ford's location in a vital industrial area where labor shortage is pro- 
nounced. The College cannot and should not attempt to compete 
with war industry in its wage policy. But it can, and I believe should, 
introduce a pension system, paralleling T.I.A.A. in a modest form, 
for those on whose continuous fidelity in manual and clerical tasks 
our institutional success in large measure depends. 

[twelve 



The Federal Social Security program is not yet applicable to Col- 
lege employes. But that is not a valid reason for failure to inaugu- 
rate our own program, which could be modified at any time if Gov- 
ernment insurance is extended to educational institutions, or even if 
adversity should make the financial load too costly to carry. Pre- 
liminary studies indicate that the cost to the College of an adequate 
contributory pension system for all non-faculty employes, effective 
at age 65, would be from $7,000 to $8,000 per annum, above the 
cost of such retirement allowances as are now being paid, on an in- 
dividual basis, with Board approval. This is admittedly a heavy 
budgetary charge. But with good management it can be shouldered. 
It is therefore hoped that a regular pension system for non-faculty 
employes, dependent on service rendered to the College over the 
years, rather than on managerial discretion, may be approved and 
put in force early in 1944. 

Presentation of this report at the conventional time — shortly after 
the opening of the traditional academic year — must not obscure the 
fact that the College has throughout 1943 been on a basis of contin- 
uous operation. Since the end of the last Christmas vacation, on 
January 3, 1943, there has not been a single week-day in which 
classes have not been held at Haverford and not one day in which 
the dining room, kitchen and dormitories have been completely 
closed. With the exception of a week's furlough in mid-August the 
P-M unit was here all of the past summer. The Summer Term for 
our own accelerating students was in operation from June 28 to 
August 28, inclusive, with 167 students in attendance. Of these 8 
were girls, 4 of them Bryn Mawr undergraduates. 

This second Summer Term, following the initial experiment in 
1942, proved very successful, in spite of the effort involved for stu- 
dents, faculty and administrative officers. It differed from its prede- 
cessor in ending with regular graduating exercises for the accelerat- 
ing Seniors, who would normally have composed the class of 1944 
but who, by attending two successive Summer Terms, secured suffi- 
cient credit to dispense with the current academic year. Of the 87 
members of this class who came to Haverford simultaneously with 
me, in September, 1940, no fewer than 33 were able to receive their 
diplomas on August 28, a record of completion challenged by very 
few of the contemporary classes in other colleges. 

thirteen] 



It may be noted that one of the members of this class to receive 
his Haverford degree was Richard M. Warren, who left us for mili- 
tary service at the end of his Junior year, was assigned to our Pre- 
Meteorology unit and there acquired sufficient academic credit to 
graduate with his classmates. The Haverford diploma awarded Pri- 
vate Warren by unanimous vote of the faculty symbolizes the solid 
educational values which Haverford and other colleges are making 
available to their military students. Our faculty are properly proud 
of this educational contribution, for which there is no parallel in 
any previous war. The classification and coordination of these aca- 
demic records, on the same basis as those maintained for our civilian 
students, constitute a part of the heavy additional administrative 
load which perhaps deserves mention. 



IV 

ANALYSIS OF STUDENT ENROLLMENT 

The Commencement of August 28 was, as foreshadowed in my 
last report, one of three held at Haverford during the year 1943. 
On January 30 we graduated 51 accelerating Seniors of the Class of 
1943, with Paul V. McNutt, Chairman of the War Manpower Com- 
mission, delivering the address. On June 5, ten non-accelerating 
students of the Class of 1943 were graduated, with William Henry 
Chamberlin, '17, on whom the College then conferred the Honorary 
degree of Doctor of Letters, as speaker. The speaker for the August 
28 Commencement was the Honorable Emory H. Niles, Judge of 
the Supreme Bench of Baltimore and Chairman of the Board of 
Goucher College. 

The decision of the College to make acceleration optional has, in 
spite of its election by the great majority of students, resulted in con- 
siderable confusion as to class delineation. This is augmented by the 
admission of Freshmen at the beginning of each normal Semester 
and at the beginning of the Summer Term. We are therefore this 
year classifying our civilian undergraduates not according to classes, 
but by the term, from one to eight, inclusive, in which they are en- 

[ FOURTEEN 



gaged. The present breakdown, exclusive of the two graduate stu- 
dents not members of the R. and R. unit, is as follows: Term VIII, 
3; Term VII, 10; Term VI, 10; Term V, 16; Term IV, 19; Term 
III, 14; Term II, 33; Term I, 22. The next admission date will be 
January 31, 1944, the beginning of the next Semester. Last February 
we admitted 25 new students, mostly mid- winter graduates of public 
high schools. 

It will be noted from the above that almost 44 per cent of the 
civilian student body have only Freshman status and that the attri- 
tion is most pronounced among the older students. This statistical 
evidence merely emphasizes the obvious effect of the draft, whereby 
every boy becomes liable for military or alternative service on reach- 
ing his eighteenth birthday. But the figures do not disclose the re- 
sult of this situation in making the civilian student body as a whole 
less mature than is normal, in addition to being much reduced in 
numbers. 

To counter this problem the administration, with excellent cooper- 
ation from the student body, is favoring the continuation of all 
extra-curricular activities which emphasize individual and group 
responsibility. That is more possible at Haverford than at most small 
men's colleges because our civilian student enrollment, although 
only 39.5 per cent of that a year ago, is still relatively high. One 
college in our class, with a normal enrollment of 450, is starting 
this year with only 67 civilian undergraduates. The figures at an- 
other are 300 and 80 respectively. The present relative numerical 
strength of our regular student body is the more encouraging since 
we only estimated an average of 100 for the year. 

For comparative purposes there is included a table showing de- 
partmental registrations of civilian undergraduates as of October 1 
in the current and six preceding years. Those courses in which regis- 
tration since last year has declined by a percentage less than the 60 
per cent decrease in student enrollment are marked with an asterisk. 
Of particular interest here is the relative recovery in French, after a 
steady decline since 1937. The slight recovery in Greek and Latin 
achieved last year has been more than wiped out by present pres- 
sures. The latter department, which nominally supports one full and 
one associate professor, has this year only five students. 

fifteen] 



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[sixteen 



While the present virtual extinction of the classics is, one hopes, 
only a war phenomenon, the decline of these studies over a long 
period serves to sharpen the issue of Haverford's degree require- 
ments, as to w^hich there is much undergraduate dissatisfaction. The 
rule which makes some knowledge of Latin or Greek a prerequisite 
for the B.A. degree at Haverford has not resulted in maintaining 
the study of the classics here. It is resulting in increasing disparity 
between the number of B.A. and B.S. degrees which are awarded. 
At the three 1943 Commencements there were 22 of the former to 
82 of the latter; in 1942, 18 and 48; in 1941, 27 and 50; in 1940, 
24 and 29; in 1939, a class which graduated before the war broke 
out in Europe, 29 B.A. degrees as against 44 B.S. 

Over the past five years the number of Haverford graduates to 
secure the B.A. degree is thus only 32.2 per cent of the number 
denominated Bachelors of Science. The majority of English and 
Modern Language majors now work for the science classification. 
The distinction has become so anomalous and arbitrary that the 
Academic Council has this Fall appointed a faculty committee to 
make immediate recommendations on the subject of degree require- 
ments, as the first though separate part of a larger inquiry which 
will include consideration of the entire post-war curriculum. On 
October 21, 1943, the faculty approved this committee's recommen- 
dation "that the B.A. degree be the normal degree awarded to all 
graduates of Haverford College," subject to reconsideration after 
the war. 



V 

ROLE OF ACADEMIC COUNCIL 

The Academic Council, now in its fourth year of operation, has 
become an indispensable part of the administrative machinery. In 
addition to the three elected divisional representatives and the two 
elected faculty representatives on the Board of Managers, it includes, 
for the emergency period, Dr. Steere, as Director of the R. and R. 
unit, and four other appointed members who now occupy the major 
administrative positions in the instruction of the military units. 

From establishment of the P-M unit in early February to August 

seventeen] 



25, Dr. Richard M. Sutton gave devoted service as its Academic 
Director. With the addition of the A.S.T.P. unit Dr. Sutton returned 
to full-time teaching and Dr. How^ard M. Teaf, Jr., was appointed 
Coordinator of Army Units and Dean of Military Students. Associ- 
ated with him are Dr. Carl AUendoerfer as Academic Director of 
the Pre-Meteorology and Basic Engineering students; Dr. Howard 
Comfort as Academic Director of Italian, and Dr. Harry Pfund as 
Academic Director of German, Language and Area Study. 

The present elected divisional representatives are Dr. Sargent 
(Humanities); Dr. AUendoerfer (Science), who thus serves in two 
capacities; and Dr. Watson (Social Science). The present elected 
faculty representatives on the Board of Managers are Dr. Oakley 
and Dr. Lockwood. These nine faculty members, with the President, 
Vice-President and Mr. Brinton H. Stone, since last June serving as 
Assistant to the President, as Secretary of the group, compose the 
Academic Council for the current year. 

The Council, which normally meets every two weeks, has proved 
its value not merely as an advisory body but increasingly as the execu- 
tive committee of the faculty, which has delegated a large measure 
of authority to this compact and representative group. To it must be 
attributed a great deal of credit for smooth operation during the 
chaotic period under review. The Council serves to integrate the 
functioning of the six distinct units of students; it provides a forum 
at which problems can be clarified and resolved in their initial 
stages; it facilitates frank interchange of viewpoint and permits 
devolution of authority for the prompt yet democratic solution of 
the many novel difficulties. 

A case in point was the preparation, by a committee of the Coun- 
cil, of a formula for the payment of summer salaries, which has 
given general satisfaction in this delicate issue. This formula, in 
essentials, provides for a 25 per cent increment over normal aca- 
demic-year remuneration for all regular faculty members teaching 
full-time throughout the entire summer in the military program, and 
a 15 per cent increment for those teaching full-time during the 
nine-week civilian Summer Term. If a full professor taught one-half 
time for P-M and one-half time in the Summer Term, his increment, 
for purposes of illustration was 12l/^% plus 71/2% of $5500, or 
$1100. Individual summer payments under this formula varied from 

[eighteen 



$1375, in three cases, to $200, in the case of one part-time teacher, 
and totalled $22,653.13, exclusive of the sum of $1050 distributed 
in small increments to administrative officers. 

A designated member of the Council — last year Dr. Snyder and 
this year Dr. Teaf — has also shared the responsibility of directing 
those faculty members whose regular students have all but disap- 
peared to the shouldering of new loads in the instruction of the 
military and R. and R. trainees. As a result of these allocations there 
has been a general equalization of teaching load and no full-time 
member of the regular Haverford faculty has been either dropped 
from the payroll or asked to accept any salary curtailment whatso- 
ever. On the contrary, work outside the normal academic year has 
received extra remuneration according to the formula described 
above. Moreover, the few cases in which there were discrepancies, 
on the minus side, between actual salary and standard for the grade, 
have this year been rectified. Nevertheless, we have achieved, as is 
shown by the report of the Treasurer, a substantial surplus for the 
second consecutive fiscal year. 

Faculty appointments and promotions constitute the heaviest re- 
sponsibility of a college president, becoming even more onerous if 
he enjoys the confidence of his Board to the extent that his recom- 
mendations in this field customarily receive almost automatic ap- 
proval. Since individual judgment is always fallible, and since every 
faculty member has a strong personal as well as professional interest 
in the scholarship, character and temperament of all his colleagues, 
it seems desirable that the executive prerogative in this matter should 
be qualified. Early this year I therefore requested the two elected 
faculty representatives on the Board of Managers (then Professors 
Meldrum and Oakley) to serve ex officio as my advisers in all mat- 
ters of regular faculty appointments and promotions. Both cheer- 
fully accepted this thankless and potentially invidious duty which 
does not, of course, remove final responsibility from the president 
and, in the last analysis, from the Board of Managers as a whole. 
With the expiration of Dr. Meldrum's term of office on the Board 
his successor there. Dr. Lockwood, assumes this advisory function. 

This development is illustrative, but only illustrative, of the 
sharply increased administrative load which has been placed on a 

nineteen] 



considerable proportion of the faculty. It has been my policy to gi\e 
greater scope to the high degree of administrative talent possessed 
by many of our teachers. But war conditions have intensified the 
development far beyond any intention on my part. Only a general 
expression of appreciation is possible, though far more is due, for 
these extra services on the part of an overburdened staff. The effort 
is the more noteworthy because of its coincidence, in many cases, 
with heavier teaching loads, with service in unaccustomed fields of 
instruction, and with year-round labor. Regular faculty members, 
retired professors — Albert H. Wilson, Henry V. Gummere and 
Legh W. Reid — and those teachers who have been added for the 
instruction of the military units have all risen nobly to the emer- 
gency. There has been some recognition of this service in the overdue 
assignment of a full-time secretary to assist in coping with the 
stenographic needs of the faculty as a body. 



VI 

RECONSTRUCTION AND RELIEF PROGRAM 

Among the additional undertakings of the College during the war 
emergency the effort to provide specialized Reconstruction and Re- 
lief training is in many respects outstanding. The present R. and R. 
unit represents a triumph over innumerable diflliculties in this 
connection. 

On February 1, 1943, under then existing Selective Service policy 
and after careful preliminary planning, a unit of some twenty bona 
fide religious conscientious objectors, half Haverford undergraduates 
and half from other colleges, was established here in conjunction 
with the training program of the American Friends Service Com- 
mittee. Under the leadership of Professors Steere, Stinnes, Drake 
and Howard Comfort, but with the active and generous assistance 
of many other faculty members, a special curriculum was set up, 
concentrating on Language and Area study (Germany) ; Interna- 
tional Relief Administration; Social Case Work and Bookkeeping, 
with a supplementary Applied Work Program. In spite of over- 
hanging uncertainty this C.P.S. Reserve continued in spirited opera- 
tion through the second semester of the normal academic year, but 

[twenty 



was brought to a close in June by a more restrictive definition of 
Selective Service regulations. 

The enforced termination of this training program did not, how- 
ever, adversely affect a notable symposium on "Some Problems of 
Reconstruction" held in the Haverford Union under the auspices of 
the unit on the afternoon of June 5 (Commencement Day). Spon- 
sored by the Bucky Foundation, the conference was led by a panel 
of distinguished speakers, including Count Carlo Sforza, former 
Foreign Minister of Italy; Clarence Pickett, executive secretary of 
the American Friends Service Committee; Dr. Benjamin Gerig, of 
the Department of State; William Henry Chamberlin, of the Haver- 
ford faculty, and Christopher Morley, Jr., then just returned from a 
year of active duty with the American Field Service in North Africa 
and the Near East. 

The termination of the first Relief program brought no loss of 
enthusiasm for two other projects planned with the American 
Friends Service Committee to begin in the Summer Term of 1943. 
One of these was the training of an advanced unit of men specially 
selected from the C.P.S. camps for service in the European area. The 
other was the training of a special unit for reconstruction work in 
China, as approved by the Federal Administration at the request of 
the Chinese government. The first of these programs was carried 
through the Summer Term, with 15 men in residence in Govern- 
ment House. The China Unit, however, was never initiated, though 
a director and staff had been chosen and everything placed in readi- 
ness for its reception at the College. The eleventh-hour disintegra- 
tion of this promising project was the result of a Congressional rider 
to the Military Appropriation Bill which in effect made the under- 
taking impossible, and which also severely restricted the training of 
the European Unit, planned to be of nine months' duration. 

The third patient endeavor of the College to be of service in the 
field of organized relief has taken form in the present R. and R. 
unit, with better prospects because it is composed almost entirely of 
women graduate students, not at present subject to draft regulations. 
This unit is now comfortably quartered in the Language House, is 
pursuing a rigorous course of graduate study which will permit its 
other^dse qualified members to complete the residence work for the 
MA. degree from Haverford, and follows a program which in- 

TWENTY-ONE} 



eludes supervised field v/ork planned for the summer of 1944. Its 
Academic Director is Douglas Steere, who has throughout refused 
to be daunted by any of the many discouragements which have been 
surmounted. But nearly every member of the regular faculty to 
some extent, and at least a dozen who should be singled out for their 
inspiring cooperation, have labored to make the present R. and R. 
unit the success denied its predecessors by circumstances and policies 
beyond our control. 

In the words of Dr. Steere, there is "real satisfaction in reflecting 
that in keeping with its Quaker tradition, Haverford has helped to 
quicken and to prepare some sixty young men and women for this 
highly important service of healing and to move them in spite of all 
hindrances to continue their training and their faith in their task 
until one day they may represent the college and its spirit in help- 
ing to thaw the heart of the frozen world." 

VII 

UNDERGRADUATE MORALE 

In spite of adverse circumstances the morale of the attenuated 
civilian student body continues high. Reference has been made to the 
effort to maintain extra-curricular activities to the fullest possible ex- 
tent and it is hoped that the alumni, realizing the difficulties which 
confront a small and decidedly juvenile undergraduate body, will 
this year be more, rather than less, generous in their support of stu- 
dent activities. By contrast with last year's outstanding team we have 
this season only a scrub football squad, with no regular schedule. 
This team, "sparked" by "Pop" Haddleton, nevertheless won all the 
three games played, including a victory over a non-military Swarth- 
more team, thus giying Haverford its second consecutive undefeated 
and untied season. Other sports will suffer in greater or lesser de- 
gree. But the Haverford News continues to appear weekly, WHAV 
adorns the local air waves, and musical prospects, reinforced by the 
notable talent which has made the P-M band outstanding, are 
excellent. 

Musical development at the College is being consciously pushed 
by the Administration and has been assisted by gracious permission 

[twenty-two 



from Alfred Percival Smith to utilize his large private room, at the 
north end of the Union, as an attractive Music Room under the per- 
sonal supervision of Professor Swan. An excellent Steinway Grand 
has been added to our equipment in this field and concerts of 
Chamber Music and other informal renditions are planned in this 
pleasant environment for the coming season. A series of public 
concerts during the Summer Term, including a delightful program 
rendered by the P-M band from the north entrance of Founders, 
proved a very pleasant innovation for the neighborhood as well as 
for the campus community. The same widespread interest is antici- 
pated for the public concerts scheduled in Roberts Hall this winter. 

The old Music Room, in the basement of the Union, has been con- 
verted into a lounge for the women students of the R. and R. unit. 
The parlor in Founders, across from the faculty room, has become 
the alumni office, in charge of Raymond T. Ohl, '21. 

With the military students occupying both Lloyd and Barclay, 
and at present outnumbering the civilian undergraduates nearly 
three to one, it has been the more important to safeguard the inter- 
ests of the latter as the essential core of the College. Such safeguards 
are also rendered necessary by the relief and reconstruction training, 
which of itself absorbs a very appreciable proportion of faculty 
time. Accordingly, several classes, as in Latin, are being offered 
under circumstances in which tuition becomes practically individual 
instruction and no normal offerings have been v/ithheld because the 
student demand fails to provide economic justification for the cost 
involved. Without our Army units it would, of course, have been far 
more difficult to maintain a faculty able to give the quality of in- 
struction which Haverford insistently maintains. 

Special care has also been taken to make both the Government 
and Panmure Road houses attractive. Dr. and Mrs. Laurence Wylie, 
newcomers to the campus, are installed as Directors of the former, 
while Dr. T. O. Jones has taken residence in the private apartment 
built into what is now known as "Science House" on Panmure Road. 
Dr. Francis Evans, another new faculty member, has special respon- 
sibility for the welfare of students in Merion Hall. Senor and 
Sefiora Asensio continue in charge at the Language House, now head- 
quarters of the R. and R. unit. Thus there is a more careful, though 
unobtrusive, supervision than has been the rule for many years, a 

twenty-three] 



policy rendered desirable by the psychological disturbance of the 
times and the unusual immaturity of the student body as a whole. 
To promote closer faculty-student relationships a series of informal 
dinners, with some twelve students and two or three professors at- 
tendant at each, was inaugurated on October 14 and will be con- 
tinued as a college function throughout the Winter. 

Of statistical interest is the fact that the smaller student body 
this year represents 20 States, including the District of Columbia, as 
against 29 States last year and 26 two years ago. Two of the students 
are Chinese, and one Peruvian; four are Japanese- Americans from 
the West Coast; one is from Hawaii, and one an American of Negro 
extraction. Undergraduates registered as members of the Society of 
Friends number 20. Expressed as a percentage of the civilian under- 
graduate body this is 15.5, as against 15.8 last year and 14.6 two 
years ago. Of the 20 members of the R. and R. unit, four are 
Friends. 

Under the direction of Dr. Flight, a non-denominational Vesper 
service is now being held for the military students at 5 p.m. on 
every Thursday except the next to the last in each month. As Fifth 
Day Meeting has been moved to the same hour — which should 
make attendance of members of the Board from this vicinity less 
difficult — and as attendance of the military students at the Vesper 
service is optional, the arrangement permits the latter also to attend 
Meeting when so inclined. It has been suggested that this arrange- 
ment might be made reciprocal. 

In this connection a discreet inquiry was, during the past year, 
made by the Administration on the student attitude towards com- 
pulsory Fifth Day Meeting. On the whole the undergraduate reac- 
tion continues to be very favorable, in part because of the steadfast 
devotion given by Dr. W. W. Comfort to this ministration. The 
chief criticism is that the goal of a Silent Meeting is rarely, if ever, 
achieved. It is asserted, perhaps with justice, that a small number of 
the faculty in attendance are almost habitually moved to speak and 
that others, whom the students name as men from whom they would 
like to hear, are seemingly either never inspired, or else are forced to 
restrain their inspiration by the greater celerity of others in address- 
ing the Meeting. Several students say that they would themselves 
occasionally like to voice a concern, if the short time available were 

[twenty-four 



not so completely monopolized by a few faculty members. At a time 
when every individual viewpoint seems so limited, and when the 
need for communion with the Infinite is so vital, it may be hoped 
that there will occasionally be a wholly silent worship at the under- 
graduate Meeting. 

VIII 

THREE COLLEGE COOPERATION 

The three-college cooperation of Bryn Mawr, Haverford and 
Swarthmore made solid, rather than sensational, progress during the 
year under review. Its practical value is at present most pronounced 
in faculty interchanges whereby emergency teaching deficiencies at 
one institution are tided over with the cooperation of the others. 
These interchanges are becoming so frequent that it would be tire- 
some to list all that have taken place during the past year. Student 
interchange is naturally easiest between Bryn Mawr and Haverford, 
though an involuntary form of this took 45 Haverford V-12 en- 
rollees to the Swarthmore College Naval Training Unit in June. The 
contingent included a large part of the Haverford football squad 
and as Navy regulations, unlike those of the Army, permit the play- 
ing of College football by enlisted men, it may almost be said that 
past gridiron rivalries are now culminating in one joint Swarthmore- 
Haverford team. 

At the invitation of President Nason I delivered the Fall Com- 
mencement address at Swarthmore and there presented Haverford 
diplomas to five of our former undergraduates who, as a result of 
the Trimester then concluding, have earned sufficient credit in the 
Swarthmore Naval Unit to entitle them to the Haverford degree. 
In addition to being a pleasant symbol of Haverford-Swarthmore 
cooperation this event was, in eff^ect, the fourth Haverford Com- 
mencement of 1943. That is not inappropriate, since 1943 has al- 
ready produced at least four times as many headaches as any normal 
College year. 

In addition to one student in Art, five Haverford undergraduates 
are taking the course in Money and Banking at Bryn Mawr. By 
coincidence this same course was last year omitted at Bryn Mawr, 
and was attended by several girls from that College when given by 

twenty-five] 



Dr. Fetter here. Two Haverford students are now studying Psychol- 
ogy at Bryn Mawr and one is taking a course in Spanish-American 
Literature there. Bryn Mawr has also graciously arranged a special 
laboratory course in Embryology for eight Haverford students, for 
which this College is remunerating the professor in charge (Dr. 
Oppenheimer) , since it is wholly a Haverford course, though given 
at the sister institution. 

A more unusual example of the triangular cooperation was carried 
through in conjunction with the U. S. Employment Service during 
the second semester last year. With Haverford initiative, and under 
the general guidance of Dr. Frank D. Watson of our faculty, teach- 
ers and students of the three Colleges for some weeks gave volun- 
tary interviewing and classification service to undermanned employ- 
ment exchanges of the Philadelphia area, this service counting for 
laboratory credit in certain Social Science courses. The experiment 
was undertaken by special arrangement with the Federal Security 
Administration and we have been urged to repeat it, if possible on 
a larger scale, this year. 

Wartime conditions have made it advisable temporarily to aban- 
don the plan for a joint three-college director of library services, 
which of course would not be allowed to infringe upon the complete 
autonomy of each College library. Nevertheless, with practical evi- 
dence of its advantages the three-college cooperation is steadily 
making headway, not merely as a result of the monthly luncheon 
conferences of Miss McBride, Dr. Nason and myself but also by 
reason of ever closer faculty and student association. It is not im- 
possible to visualize a time when it may seem desirable to unite 
these three colleges to form a single unique university, without any 
more injury to the identity of the separate units than is caused to 
Balliol or Christ Church or New College by their participation in 
the larger life of Oxford University. If this development should ever 
come to pass the work of the past three years will prove to be not 
merely illustrations of cooperation for mutual benefit, but also the 
first foundation work for possible consolidation. 



[twenty-six 



IX 

CHANGES, CONTRIBUTIONS AND NEEDS 

Alumni interest in Haverford was unquestionably stimulated by 
the spectacular football season of 1942, in which an undefeated and 
untied team climaxed its record by beating Swarthmore, on Novem- 
ber 21, for the first time since 1916. It remains to be seen whether 
enthusiasm then aroused will carry over now that the activities of the 
College are less dramatic, but the need for graduate loyalty far 
greater, than a year ago. With the exception of the Pittsburgh asso- 
ciation every local organization held its annual dinner last year, that 
of New England being addressed by the Vice-President and those 
of New York, Baltimore and Washington by myself. The last-named 
organization is, understandably, now far larger than ever before. 
But its rapid enlargement has not meant any decline in the vitality 
of other local alumni bodies. There should be more of these. 

The Haverford Review, which has now completed its second year 
of publication, has in the last three issues, under the skilled editor- 
ship of Dr. Ralph Sargent, increasingly proved its value as a link 
between the College and its alumni, and has further evoked wide- 
spread interest as a distinctive forum on the problems and potenti- 
alities of the small college during this period of crisis. It is hoped 
that this very valuable little publication may nov/ be regarded as 
out of the experimental stage, though the difficulties of the times 
may make it desirable to bring out only two issues (instead of the 
normal three) this year. 

Changes in the regular faculty have been less numerous than 
might have been expected during the period under review. The most 
serious loss for the campus community was the tragic death, on 
October 13, of Assistant Professor Montford V. Melchior, who 
since June had been Acting Chairman of the Romance Language 
Department, succeeding Rene Blanc-Roos, whose resignation was 
accepted that month. Dr. Howard Comfort has now added the act- 
ing chairmanship of this department to his other duties. 

Professor Frank W. Fetter has been on leave of absence with the 
Foreign Economic Administration since February 1 and is now sta- 
tioned in India. Since June Dr. Emmett R. Dunn has been absent on 
a year's leave of absence at the Institute de Ciencias Naturales in 

twenty-seven] 



Bogota, Colombia. Dr. William E. Cadbury left this Fall for a year's 
leave of absence to be spent at the University of North Carolina. Dr. 
Alexander J. Williamson, Mr. Lindsay Lafford and Mr. George 
Vaux have, during the past year, entered the Navy, while Mr. Roy 
Randall has joined the Marine Corps. Otherwise there have been no 
losses in our regular faculty since my last report. There have been 
numerous additions, of a temporary character, all of Mrhom have 
entered into the cooperative solution of our many problems with 
enthusiasm as well as ability. Two deaths among our professors 
emeriti must be regretfully noted — that of Elihu Grant on Novem- 
ber 2, 1942, and that of Don Carlos Barrett on January 20, 1943. 

Promotions during the year raised Dr. Ralph M. Sargent from 
Associate Professor to Professor of English; Dr. Howard M. Teaf, 
Jr., from Assistant Professor to Associate Professor of Economics 
and Dr. Edmund Stinnes from Visiting Professor to Associate Pro- 
fessor of Government. Mr. Brinton H. Stone, who came to the Col- 
lege a year ago as Assistant Dean, has, as noted in another connec- 
tion, been made Assistant to the President; Mr. Thomas C. Gibb, 
formerly Instructor in English as well as Assistant Dean, has been 
made Acting Dean, relieving Vice-President Macintosh of one of his 
many responsibilities. Mr. Gibb, however, continues to give some 
assistance to our English Department. 

Contributions during the past year are detailed in the Treasurer's 
Report and can here be given only a general, though grateful, ac- 
knowledgment. That which must arouse the deepest appreciation 
was the $2500 gift whereby Walter C. Janney cleared off the linger- 
ing debt on the Library addition, which now stands wholly free and 
unencumbered. The same member of the Board of Managers has 
made invaluable contributions of rare volumes to the Quakeriana 
Collection. The foresight of Morris Leeds, in making the beautiful 
Treasure Room in the Library possible, is increasingly attested by 
various deposits of priceless literary and historical material, in which 
the gifts from Walter Janney, '98, and Christopher Morley, '10, are 
outstanding. Under Dr. Lockwood's guidance an organization of the 
"Library Associates" of Haverford College has been formally 
launched. His very interesting report is printed in this issue of the 
"Bulletin." 

An anonymous friend of the College this year supplemented his 
[twenty-eight 



1942 gift of $2250 for Summer Term scholarships with a similar 
$1500 contribution, thus greatly assisting a number of meritorious 
students to pursue the accelerated program. The same donor con- 
tributed $2000 for special scholarship assistance to Chinese students 
here. The Field House fund, formally inaugurated after the Wes- 
leyan game a year ago, has without any attempt at promotion 
climbed by small contributions to attain the $1000 mark. A drive in 
its behalf will be inaugurated when the time seems propitious. 

Mention of the proposed Field House suggests the question of 
post-war plant, to which it is not too early to give advance consider- 
ation. Merion Hall and Annex are definitely antiquated, as well as 
badly situated for dormitory purposes. Another unit of Lloyd Hall, 
together with our House development, would permit us to abandon 
Merion and still easily accommodate the enrollment of 400 students 
agreed upon as the desirable post-war figure. The question of re- 
placement of the Chemistry Laboratory, though this building is for 
its age still in excellent condition and has been improved during the 
past year, is brought nearer by the steady advance in our premedical 
and other Chemistry training. All our laboratory equipment should 
also be carefully reviewed in anticipation of post-war trends. Con- 
struction of a Field House might well permit conversion of the well- 
built gymnasium to laboratory needs. 

There might also be consideration of a residence definitely de- 
signed as the home of the President of the College, which I may 
with the more propriety suggest because there can be no assumption 
that I shall still be at Haverford when the time for this improve- 
ment comes. It is not out of order to state here the belief that the 
man responsible for the administration of Haverford during the 
difficult war period is by no means necessarily the appropriate Presi- 
dent to handle the presumably very different problems of the recon- 
struction era. This is not the time to explain the reasoning behind 
this conviction. The essential point is that Haverford must continue 
to be creative as a dynamic institution, and should therefore con- 
sciously avoid any dubious identification of individual leadership 
and corporate accomplishment. 

Suggestions for the College building program which should at 
least be envisaged before the end of the war will be made to the 
appropriate committee of the Board of Managers in due course. 

twenty-nine} 



Examination of future needs in respect to plant is the more log- 
ical because present equipment has nov/ been brought to a high 
state of efficiency, in part as a result of the advent of the military 
units. Barclay Hall was completely renovated before the arrival of 
the P-M group and desirable improvements have been made in 
Lloyd Hall in connection v^ith the A.S.T. installation. The furnish- 
ing, equipment and lighting of classrooms and laboratories have 
been similarly further modernized. Of particular interest in this 
connection is the decision to install, this vi^inter, the long-discussed 
and much-desired central telephone switchboard, made possible in 
wartime because our service to the Government gives us the neces- 
sary priorities. 

X 

THE COLLEGE AND THE COMMUNITY 

That the American College owes direct service to its community 
has been stressed in previous reports as a cardinal principle of the 
present administration. It is therefore gratifying to note that the con- 
tribution of our E.S.M.W.T. program, initiated on the campus as a 
form of adult education for neighboring industrial workers, has in- 
creased during its second year of operation. 

In 1942-43 there were 148 enrollees in seven courses as against 
98 enrollees in six courses the year previous. A college certificate and 
congratulatory letter are sent to those completing each course. In 
each year there have been 16 instructors, eleven members of our 
faculty and some alumni among the remaining five. Professor Rit- 
tenhouse, who has throughout served most competently as institu- 
tional representative for the U. S. Office of Education in this im- 
portant program, points out that: "A much larger percentage of 
enrollees this past year have been older men and these have been 
recruited from the business class in such relatively non-essential 
work as insurance agents, accountants, salesmen, etc. Also women, 
young and middle-aged, have been enrolled this year in compliance 
with the Government's directive, about thirty in all." 

Limited time will not permit even itemization of all the other in- 
stances in which the College is attempting to integrate itself more 
firmly with the community with very satisfactory results. A case 

[thirty 



which may be noted, however, is the service of Dr. Louis C. Green 
in developing more widely the old-established policy of "open 
house" at the Strawbridge Memorial Observatory. Among the groups 
of astronomical observers one notes a contingent of fifteen Negro 
girls from the Buck Lane Community Center. Moreover, the whole 
campus during the past year has been made freely available to Boy 
Scout jamborees and well-conducted social groups, as well as to 
inter-academic track meets and delegates to the September confer- 
ence on Religion in Higher Education. The College skating pond is 
open this winter to the public on Sunday afternoons as well as daily. 

In addition to those who addressed the three Commencements, a 
number of important speakers have been brought to the campus dur- 
ing the past year. A review of the list shows that the urgency of 
preserving the fundamental liberties in wartime was, through no 
accident, the theme most insistently stressed. 

Thus Charles E. Houston, a prominent Negro attorney of Wash- 
ington, spoke in Collection on October 27, on "The American Ne- 
gro's Position in the Present Crisis"; on December 1, John F. Finerty, 
of the American Civil Liberties Union, told of the work of that 
organization; on January 12, Carl Ackerman, Dean of the School of 
Journalism at Columbia University, addressed Collection on "Free- 
dom of the Press in Wartime," his remarks here being later printed 
in "Vital Speeches of the Day." In addition to these and other not- 
able Collection speakers, many prominent men visited Haverford to 
participate in Seminar and other group discussions. Dr. Stinnes has 
been particularly helpful in bringing to the campus such leaders of 
German liberal thought as former Chancellor Bruening, Dr. Wolf- 
gang Stresemann, Robert Ulich, Max Brauer, Hermann Rauschning 
and others. Scandinavian members of the diplomatic corps re- 
sponded heartily to requests to furnish guest speakers for the R. and 
R. unit. Some were brought in by the very active undergraduate In- 
ternational Relations Club, which carried off high honors at the 
model United Nations Assembly held at Hamilton College last 
March. Among many special addresses on scientific subjects may be 
mentioned the one by Dr. J. Russell Elkinton, '36, on "The Role of 
Water in Physiology." 

The Shipley Lecture was given on January 15 by Mr. Edmund 
Wilson, speaking on "Finnegans Wake." The Library Lecture, de- 

thirty-one] 



livered by Dr. Elton Tmeblood, on December 10, was on "The 
Message of the Bible for This Hour." The normal undergraduate 
musical and dramatic performances, given in conjunction with Bryn 
Mawr, all drew good audiences, in spite of mounting transportation 
difficulties. 

Although the health of the College during the year under survey 
was on the whole excellent, the report of the Morris Infirmary re- 
flects the additional load resulting from the addition of the P-M 
unit in February. During the academic year 1941-42 (excluding 
Summer Term), the Infirmary admitted 94 patients who were hos- 
pitalized there for a total period of 455 days, an average of 4.85 
days per patient. For the corresponding period in 1942-43, the fig- 
ures were 214 patients admitted for a total of 984 days, with the 
almost identical average of 4.60 days per patient. In the past year 
there was a total of 3893 visits to dispensary patients as against 
3469 such visits the year preceding. The gratitude of all connected 
with Haverford is due to the College physician, Dr. Herbert W. 
Taylor, '14, and the resident nurse, Miss Mabel S. Beard, for their 
assumption of heavy additional professional duties. 

This point is as logical a place as any for me to express my deep 
appreciation for the service rendered to Haverford in innumerable 
ways by Major William George Frey, U.S.A. A. F. Commandant of 
our Pre-Meteorology Unit since April 26 and since September 13 in 
command of the entire military contingent. It has been a wholly 
pleasurable experience to work cooperatively with this courteous, 
tactful, intelligent and efficient officer. The solution of many of our 
new problems would have been more difficult without the always 
constructive collaboration of Major Frey. 

A passing reference should perhaps be made to certain extra- 
curricular activities assumed by the President of the College during 
the year under review. It witnessed my appointment to three im- 
portant educational committees, two meeting periodically in Wash- 
ington and one in New York. These, together with the preparation 
of numerous addresses and articles, have absorbed a great deal of 
time but have not been without value for Haverford as an institu- 
tion. The committees referred to are: (1) The War Department's 
Civilian Advisory Committee on the Army Specialized Training 
Program; (2) The American Council on Education's Committee on 

[thirty-two 



The Relationships of Higher Education with The Federal Govern- 
ment; (3) The Association of American Colleges' Committee on 
Problems of Citizenship. 

In addition, with approval of the Board of Managers, I made 
several extended trips to Washington in January and February in 
connection with the writing of a report, requested from me by the 
War Manpower Commission, on "The More Effective Utilization of 
Small College Facilities in the National Interest." Copies of this re- 
port, dated February 11, 1943, have been furnished all members 
of the Board of Managers. 

XI 

THROUGH A GLASS DARKLY 

In conclusion, apologies are in order for the length of this annual 
report and also a word of explanation for its preoccupation with 
factual matters. I have sought to show, admittedly in bald summary, 
how Haverford College has responded and expanded in the face of 
the most severe challenge in its 110 years of corporate life. There 
has been only implicit consideration of the alterations in educational 
policy Tv'hich may become necessary or desirable as a result of the 
cosmic upheaval through which our civilization is passing. 

This subordination of speculation is intentional. The future is so 
obscure, the changes which are coming in our society may be so pro- 
found, that it seems the path of wisdom not to indulge prematurely 
in tenuous consideration of the post-war policy of Haverford. For 
the present the essential task is to improve the College organization, 
to strengthen and vitalize its morale, to modernize its equipment and 
broaden its outlook so that whatever post-war policy may later seem 
clearly advisable can then be carried out with maximum chance 
of success. 

Moreover, it seems probable that the changes to be anticipated at 
Haverford will be less disturbing than those in store for society as 
a whole. That is because this College has always concentrated on 
fundamentals rather than superficialities. And it is the superficial 
rather than the fundamental values which will, I think, be swept 
away by the revolution now in process. 

If a result of the current revolution is a substantial alteration in 

thirty-three] 



the character of our middle class, then the composition of the Hav- 
erford student body will also change, almost automatically. If a re- 
sult should be a permanent increase in the authority and assertive- 
ness of a socialistic state, then Haverford will necessarily have to 
emphasize a close and purposeful integration with the larger com- 
munity of which we are a part. While conservative, Haverford has 
always proved itself adaptable. Emphasis on a well-poised flexibility, 
which will permit us to render the finest possible educational service 
amid wholly unpredictable circumstances, is at present more im- 
portant than any endeavor to design blueprints for a future on the 
character of which wise men withhold prediction. 

Such flexibility of outlook will in the long run mean the strength- 
ening rather than the surrender of our educational ideals. I believe 
these may be summarized by saying that they involve the parallel 
and coordinated development of the ardent intellectual curiosity, 
the constructively critical instinct, and the sincerely Christian char- 
acter of the youth entrusted to our care. Whatever conceivable eco- 
nomic and political circumstances in which Haverford may find it- 
self, these educational objectives can be maintained by the College 
and attained by those who study here. Despite the war, Haverford 
moves forward. 

Felix M. Morley, 
President. 



Report of the Librarian 

To the President: 

I have the honor to submit herewith the Report on the Library 
for the academic year 1942-43. 

I 

It has been demonstrated in the past year that the Library is the 
department of the College least disturbed by the war. This does not 
mean that it is unaffected by the war, for it certainly reflects in its 
book-collections the complete eclipse of European culture and in its 
services it has had to meet new educational demands at short notice. 

[thirty-four 



But thanks to the steady income of our library endowments and to 
the unbroken ranks of our small, but experienced staff, the Library 
has functioned with outward calm. 

As during the two previous years, nine-tenths of our income for 
books has been spent for American and British publications and one- 
tenth set aside for post-war purchases of material not now avail- 
able. As usual, the volumes donated have been approximately equal 
in number and value to those purchased. To put each of the 3500 
new books (both those purchased and those donated) into the exact 
spot where it belongs among the 160,000 already shelved, and to 
keep track of every book in the library in a score of different cate- 
gories useful to students, teachers, and outside readers (such as 
home-loan, over-night reserve, three-day reserve, individual use in 
stack-carrels, and just plain table-use of books drawn from our gen- 
eral and our many special and separately shelved collections) has 
been the task of the library staff, working with the utmost of war- 
time economy. 

The accelerated program and the work of the army units have 
required a considerable increase in the "reserving" of books, and in 
the borrowing of books from neighboring institution — a practical 
form of cooperation which has grown steadily and will continue to 
grow. The class-rooms and the Gummere-Morley room in the new 
building have been a great help in meeting some of the problems 
of war-time instruction. In general, it may be said that the army stu- 
dents have used the Library as much as the civilians, but their use 
has been concentrated in the evening hours. Many an evening the 
old building and the study-carrels in the stacks have been practically 
full. 

A first step toward the complete use of the fourth tier of the stacks 
has been made by moving the entire Mathematics Library from its 
quarters in Founders Hall, which were not fire-proof, to its perma- 
nent location in the new building. Adjacent to the book-shelves, two 
rooms on the fourth tier have been assigned to the Mathematics De- 
partment: one for seminar purposes and the other as a computing 
room, containing calculating machines. The furnishing of the south- 
east class-room and the remaining six or seven studies in the fourth 
tier is much to be desired. 

This leaves five department libraries permanently located in other 

thirty-five} 



buildings along with their respective laboratories: biology, physics, 
engineering, chemistry (which has been enlarged), and astronomy 
(which has been very thoroughly reorganized by Prof. Green). A 
good start has been made on a more accurate system of cards for the 
unsupervised charging-out of books from these libraries. 

II 

The popularity of the Gummcre-Morley Room has steadily in- 
creased. If the lure of its comfortable chairs leads many students to 
use it merely as a study, its primary purpose is nevertheless not for- 
gotten. Browsers, though rarae aves, are regularly seen there. Com- 
plete selections of books have been made in the fields of travel, 
history, and literature. The curator. Prof. Sargent, has sought advice 
and help from many sources, and has chosen the books with great 
care. 

Although an art-museum (in terms of floor-space) is out of the 
question in the library building, the hanging of paintings on the 
walls is a splendid enhancement of the cultural value of the library. 
The new catalogue-room, the center of the building both structur- 
ally and functionally, offers an unusually fine setting for our now 
distinguished collection of paintings: the Pinturicchio presented by 
Miss Griscom and the three masterpieces of the Stork Collection — 
Whistler, Sargent, and Inness. Temporarily hung with these is the 
Hans Has loaned by Prof. Bernheimer. 

In a very different category artistically, but of great historical in- 
terest, are the six tapestries from the League of Nations Building at 
the New York World's Fair. These tapestries, depicting the evolu- 
tion of political society, were loaned by authorization of Prof. Gerig. 
They have now been hung in the Staff Room — not in order that 
their enjoyment may be restricted to the members of the staff (for 
the room is wide-open all day and the tapestries are readily visible 
from the catalog-room outside) , but in order that the tapestries may 
be seen in close sequence and in their proper order, as well as to 
prevent their clashing artistically with the paintings. 

Artistic, as well as practical, considerations suggest what must be 
our next step in reconstructing or remodelling the Library. The old 
North Wing — the entire original building of the 1860's — must be 

[thirty-six 



"uncluttered" and restored to its pristine effectiveness as a charming 
and simple reading-room, without the gallery which blocks off the 
light and without the medley of central bookcases. This and other 
rearrangements and restorations in the old building are well worth 
planning as a post-war hope. 

When the Library Associates shall have been well established, as 
outlined in my article in the summer number of the Haverford 
Review (Vol. II, No. 3), they may perhaps some day hold meetings 
in the old room. 

The total number of volumes in the library at the end of August, 
1943, was 160,268, not including the uncatalogued government doc- 
uments. During the past year 3448 books were formally added to our 
collection. 1634 of these were purchased, l46l were gifts, and 353, 
though merely deposited here by the United States Government, 
were classified and catalogued. There were five or six hundred more 
government documents added to the uncatalogued collection. 152 
volumes were discarded, as being worn out, lost, or no longer useful. 

Ill 

We wish again to express our thanks to all those who have so 
generously donated books or money. The following gifts are espe- 
cially noteworthy: 

An anonymous gift of $750.00 for the Library of Congress 
Catalog of Printed Cards. 

From Morris E. Leeds, $400 for the photo-lithoprint re- 
production of Beilstein's Handbuch der Organischen 
Chemie, and $100 as an organization fund for the 
Library Associates. 

From Prof, and Mrs. Kirsopp Lake, 550 books and 
pamphlets. 

From E. Marshall Scull, 616 volumes in memory of Edward 
Lawrence Scull, class of 1864. 

From Dr. Donald C. A. Butts, 112 scientific books. 

From Elizabeth Williamson, 99 volumes. 

thirty-seven] 



From Peter Deitsch, 64 volumes of general and children's 
literature. 

From Ann C. Almy, 45 volumes of the Everyman series. 

From William L. Baily, 45 volumes. 

From the estate of Albert Edmunds, books and personal 
papers. 

From the Corn Exchange National Bank, 23 books on 
economics. 

From John G. Herndon, 13 volumes. 

From the Biddle Law Library, 12 volumes. 

Not to be reckoned in number of volumes are the extraordinarily 
valuable books and manuscripts presented by Walter Janney and by 
Christopher Morley, which are on exhibition in our Treasure Room. 
With these should be mentioned the first folio Shakespeare depos- 
ited on indefinite loan by John L. Balderston. 

Many other donors contributed one or more volumes each. A com- 
plete list of these individuals and institutions would contain over 
two hundred and fifty names. To all of them we are grateful for 
their contributions. 

Several more volumes have been added to the Rufus M. Jones col- 
lection on Mysticism, bringing the total up to around 965 volumes. 
The cataloging of these books is practically completed and many 
have been bound or rebound, thanks to the generosity of friends of 
the college. 

The total circulation of library books for the past year was 17,843. 
Of this number, 3,117 were loaned to professors, 11,621 to students, 
and 2,805 to borrowers not connected with the College. In addition 
to these, 219 were sent out on inter-library loan, and 75 were bor- 
rowed by us, besides many more which the students themselves bor- 
rowed from cooperating libraries in the vicinity. We find the Union 
Catalog of Philadelphia of great value in locating books, and we 
have also made frequent use of it in our cataloging department. 
During the year, we sent 3451 cards to be added to the Union 
Catalog. 

[thirty-eight 



Although circulation within the building cannot be included in 
our statistics, it has been extensive. It is bound to be heavy in an 
open-shelf library like ours. Books reserved by the professors for the 
various courses were extensively used during the year, both within 
the library and for overnight circulation. In addition to these books, 
many of the students made use of the carrels in the stacks to re- 
serve books for indefinite periods. 

Collections of 150 or more books for the Victory campaign were 
twice passed on to the Free Library of Philadelphia for distribution. 

In place of Miss Barbara Overton, resigned. Dr. Else Goldberger, 
a graduate of the University of Vienna, was appointed to the posi- 
tion of Order Librarian and keeper of Library accounts. 

D. P. LOCKWOOD, 

Librarian. 



REPORT OF THE CURATOR OF THE 
QUAKER COLLECTION, 1942-43 

The first full year in the new Treasure Room of the Library has 
been one of progress commensurate with the beauty and utility of 
this new home for Haverford's rare books and Quakeriana. With 
safety now assured, friends of the College have begun placing here 
their choicest books and manuscripts. Rare works on Penn, Pennsyl- 
vania, and the Puritans have been given to us by Walter C. Janney. 
Christopher Morley has added many items to his earlier gifts of 
books and manuscripts, including an autograph letter-book of Ber- 
nard Barton and a Sherlock Holmes manuscript. John Lloyd Balder- 
ston has entrusted us with his Shakespeare First Folio. Henry J. 
Cadbury has contributed an unusual collection of early anti- 
Quakeriana. 

The great library of the Representative Meeting of Philadelphia 
Yearly Meeting (Arch Street) is being analyzed and made ready for 
incorporation into the Quaker Collection. Quaker families, such as 
the Howlands of New York, and the Emlens and Copes of Ger- 
mantown, have given Haverford the pick of their libraries, and four 
paintings of the famous Cope packet ships of Philadelphia have 
been presented by Thomas Pim Cope through Rufus M. Jones. 

thirty-nine] 



To the Charles Roberts Autograph Collection there have come 
over two hundred autographs from William Bacon Evans. The 
twenty-two scrapbooks of Josiah W. Leeds, placed here on loan by 
his children, contain many famous autographs, as well as much of 
interest relating to Quaker reform activities in the late nineteenth 
century. 

A total of 210 Quaker books were received by gift during the 
year, in addition to 112 which were purchased. There were 315 
manuscripts of Quaker interest given to the College, as well as 195 
pictures, thirty-six manuscript books, and one map. To the Roberts 
Collection were added 233 autographs. 

Much of the time and interest of the Curator and Assistant 
Curator were put into helping in the administration and secretarial 
work of the Reconstruction and Relief unit during the launching of 
this practical expression of the Quaker desire to share in rebuilding 
the warring world. This work will be taken care of through normal 
channels henceforth. But the duty to make the Quaker Collection a 
center of continuing usefulness is greater than ever, now that it 
enjoys the splendid setting of the Treasure Room. 

It would be desirable if arrangements could be made for the room 
to remain open during the evening hours and on week-ends. More 
of Haverford's visitors would thereby see the treasures of the Col- 
lege, and students and scholars would find the annals of the Society 
of Friends more conveniently accessible. 

Thomas E. Drake, 

Curator. 



Qr^^Cl?^::^) 



[forty 



PUBLICATIONS OF THE FACULTY, 1942-43 

ALLENDOERFER, CARL B. 

"The Gauss-Bonnet Theorem for Riemannian Polyhedra" (with Andre 
Weil). Transactions of the American Mathematical Society, 53:101-129. 
Jan. 1943. 

"The Training of Weather Officers in Wartime". American Journal of 
Physics, 11:153-154. June 1943. 

BABBIT, JAMES A. 
"Disorders of Hearing: Diseases of the Ear". Chapter 20, pages 303-315, 
in Geriatric Medicine. Philadelphia: W. B. Saunders. 1943. 

CADBURY, WILLIAM E. 
"Coprecipitation of Chromate with Barium Sulfate" (with William B. 
Meldrum). Industrial and Engineering Chemistry, Analytical Edition, 15:560- 
562. Sept. 1943. 

CHAMBERLIN, WILLIAM H. 

Canada Today and Tomorrow. Boston: Little, Brown, 1942. 

The Russian Enigma: An Interpretation. New York: Charles Scribner's 
Sons. 1943. 

'"Our Ally Mexico". Atlantic Monthly, 170:101-8. Dec. 1942. 

"Sources of Russia's Strength". Harper's, 186:396-403. Mar. 1943. 

"The Middle Road: Post-war." Harper's, 186:587-95. May 1943. 

""The United Nations: Coalition for War and Peace". Yale Review, new 
series, 32:625-41. June 1943. 

"The Confessions of a Chocolate Eater". Atlantic Monthly, 172:107-110. 
July 1943. 

COMFORT, HOWARD 

""War and National Sovereignties". Na2ioni Unite, vol. 1, Oct. 1942. 

"International Authority and National Sovereignty". American Scholar, 
11:504-6. Autumn 1942. 

"The Modern Implication of Greek History". Crozer Quarterly, 20:196- 
211. July 1943. 

"Terra Sigillata from Minturnae". American Journal of Archaeology, 
47:313-330. July-Sept. 1943. 

Occasional articles on Italy in the Christian Science Monitor and other 
newspapers. 

Reviews of classical and archaeological publications. 

forty-one] 



COMFORT, WILLIAM W. 

Quaker Trends for Modern Friends. Philadelphia: Friends Book Commit- 
tee. 1943. 104 pages. 

"Friends and the Bible". Friends Intelligencer, 100:236-237. Fourth 
month 10, 1943. 

DRAKE, THOMAS E. 

"Rare Penn Volumes for Haverford". Haverford Review, 2:27-28. Spring, 
1943. 

Rev. of Ethyn W. Kirby, George Keith (1683-1716), in Pennsylvania 
Magazine of History and Biography, 64:484-485. Oct. 1942. 

EVANS, FRANCIS C. 

"Studies of a Small Mammal Population in Bagley Wood, Berkshire". 
Journal of Animal Ecology, 11:182-197. Nov. 1942. 

"Sylvatic Plague Studies III: An Epizootic of Plague among Ground 
Squirrels (Citellus Beecheyi) in Kern County, California" (senior author, 
with C. M. Wheeler and J. R. Douglas) . Journal of Infectious Diseases, 
72:68-76. Jan.-Feb. 1943. 

"A Population Study of the Beechey Ground Squirrel in Central Califor- 
nia" (senior author, with R. Holdenried). Journal of Mammalogy, 24:231- 
260. May 1943. 

"Double Captures of Small Rodents in California" (senior author, with 
R. Holdenried). Journal of Mammalogy, 24:401. Aug. 1943. 

Rev. of Charles Elton, Alice, Voles and Lemmings, in Journal of Wild- 
life Management. 7:238-240. April 1943. 

FLIGHT, JOHN W. 

Rev. of W. M. Battenhouse, This Seed of Faith, in Journal of Bible and 
Religion, 10:233-34. Nov. 1942. 

Rev. of W. E. Hocking, What Man Can Make of Man, in Journal of Bible 
and Religion, 10:231. Nov. 1942. 

Rev. of W. A. Smart, The Contemporary Christ, in Journal of Bible and 
Religion, 10:244-5. Nov. 1942. 

Rev. of Walter M. Horton, Our Eternal Contemporary, in Journal of Bible 
and Religion, 11:231-2. Aug. 1943. 

Abstracts of archaeological and Historical studies in English and foreign 
periodicals in American Journal of Archaeology. 

Editor, "Proceedings of the Society of Biblical Literature and Exegesis", 
in Journal of Biblical Literature, 62:1-24. 1943. 

Associate Editor, The Journal of Bible and Religion. 

[forty-two 



GREEN, LOUIS C. 
Rev. of J. C. Duncan, Essentials of Astronomy, in The Review of Scien- 
tific Instruments, 13:447. Oct. 1942. 

HERNDON, JOHN G. 

Significant Developments Affecting Business During 1942. Philadelphia: 
John C Winston. 1942. 64 pages. 

"The Federal Income Tax of 1942 Applicable to American Citizens and 
to Aliens Resident in the United States". Pages 1-126 in The Winston 
Cujnulative Business Administration, vol. 3. Philadelphia. Jan. 1943. 

"The Reverend John Thomson". Journal of the Presbyterian Historical 
Society, 20:116-158, Dec. 1942, and 21:34-59, Mar. 1943. 

"Financial Recognition of Ex-servicemen". Annals of the American Aca- 
demy of Political and Social Science, 227:122-127. May 1943. 

"Captain Thomas Redd (ca. 1730-1801) and His Family". Virginia Maga- 
zine of History and Biography, 51 :203-210. April 1943. 

"Six Herndon Immigrants to Colonial America". William and Mary Col- 
lege Quarterly Historical Magazine, second series, 23:330-335. July 1943. 

Rev. of D. O. Bowman, Public Control of Labor Relations, in American 
Political Science Review, 37:144-6. Feb. 1943. 

Comment on Wartime Rationing and Consumption, in American Political 
Science Review, 37:374. April 1943. 

JONES, RUFUS M. 
New Eyes for Invisibles. New York: Macmillan. 1943. ix-185 pages. 
"Jewish Mysticism". Harvard Theological Review, 36:155-163. April 1943. 
"American Friends in France 1917-1919". Administration of Relief 
Abroad, Russell Sage Foundation, August 1943. Pages 1-27. 

LeGALLEY, DONALD P. 

"Improvement of Color Vision by Vitamin Intake". American Journal of 
Pharmacy, 115:95-99. March 1943. 

LOCKWOOD, DEAN P. 

"It is Time to Recognize a New 'Modern Age.' " Journal of the History 
of Ideas, 4:63-65. Jan. 1943. 

Macintosh, Archibald 

"Differential Effect of the Status of the Competing Group upon the Levels 
of Aspiration". American Journal of Psychology, 55:546-554. Oct. 1942, 

forty-three} 



MELDRUM, WILLIAM B. 

"Coprecipitation of Chromate with Barium Sulfate" (with W. E. Cad- 
bury). Industrial and Engineering Chemistry, Analytical Edition, 15:560-562. 

Rev. of Randall and Young, Physical Chemistry, in Journal of the Frank- 
lin Institute, 234:403-405. Oct. 1942. 

MORLEY, FELIX M. 
"Can The Small College Survive?" Saturday Evening Post, Oct. l6, 1943. 
Various Articles and Reviews. 

OAKLEY, CLETUS O. 
"The Coming Revolution — in Mathematics". The Mathematics Teacher, 
Nov. 1942, pages 307-309. 

OHL, RAYMOND T. 
Rev. of Edith Hall Dohan, Italic Tomb-Groups in the University Museum, 
in Classical Weekly, 36:7-8. 5 Oct. 1942. 

PANCOAST, OMAR, JR. 
"Malthus vs. Ricardo — The Effects of Distribution on Production". Politi- 
cal Science Quarterly, 58:47-66. Mar. 1943. 

PEPINSKY, ABE 

"Laryngeal Ventricle Considered as an Acoustical Filter". Journal of the 
Acoustical Society of America, 14:32-35. July 1942. 

"Contributions of Science to an Appreciation of Music". Journal of the 
Franklin Institute, 235:361-392. Apr. 1943. 

Rev. of John G. Watkins, Objective Measurement of Instrumental Per- 
formance, in Science, 97:488-489. May 28, 1943. 

PFUND, HARRY W. 
Editorial Board, American-German Review, vol. 9, Philadelphia, 1942-43. 

POST, L. ARNOLD 

"A Note on Sophronius of Damascus". Harvard Theological Review, 
36:91. Jan. 1943. 

Rev. of Lattimore, Themes in Greek and Latin Epitaphs, in The American 
Oxonian, 30:34-36. Jan. 1943. 

Editor, Loeb Classical Library. 

SARGENT, RALPH M. 
Editor, The Haverford Review, 

[FORTY-FOUR 



SNYDER, EDWARD D. 
Rev. of F. A. Pottle, The Idiom of Poetry, in College English, 4:82-83. 
Oct. 1942. 

STEERE, DOUGLAS V. 

1942 Ingersoll Lecture, Death's Illumination of Life. Harvard Divinity 
School Bulletin, 40: no. 15. 

Rev. of Ethyn W. Kirby, George Keith, in Crozer Quarterly, 20:344-6. 

G)mment on Karl Barth, A Letter to American Christians, in Qiristen- 
dom, 8:469-472. 

Articles and reviews in Friends Intelligencer, The Friend and The Ameri- 
can Friend. 

STINNES, EDMUND H. 
The Economic Unification of Continental Europe. Special Paper for Study 
Groups and Officials in U. S. A. and Great Britain. New York: Commission 
to Study the Organization of Peace. 1942. 16 pages. 

SUTTON, RICHARD M. 

"An Instrument for Drawing Confocal Ellipses and Hyperbolas". American 
Mathematical Monthly, 50:253-4. Apr. 1943. 

"Physics in War and Peace". General Electric Review, 46:479-480. Sept. 
1943. 

Rev. of Frank L. Robeson, Physics, in Review of Scientific Instruments, 
14:112-113. Apr. 1943. 

Rev. of A. Wilmer Duff and Morton Masias, College Physics, in Review 
of Scientific Instruments, 14:114. Apr. 1943. 

Rev. of Ralph Stranger, Dictionary of Radio and Television Tenns, in 
Journal of Applied Physics, 14:166. Apr. 1943. 

Rev. of James Stokley, Science Remakes our World, in Journal of Applied 
Physics, 14:365. July 1943. 

SWAN, ALFRED J. 

"New Developments in the Transcription of Byzantine Melodies" Musical 
Quarterly, 29:254-256. Apr. 1943. 

"S. V. Rachmaninoff in the History of Music" (in Russian), Rossiya, 
New York. vol. 11, 8 Apr. 1943. 

VITTORINI, DOMENICO 
"La 'Corte del Cielo'." Italica, 20:57-64. June 1943. 



Omitted from the 1941-42 list 
BENHAM, THOS. A. 
"An Improved Stimulator for Obtaining Semen from Small Mammals" 
(with Robert K. Enders). North American Veterinarian, 22:300-301. May 
1941. 

FORTY- five] 



STATED MEETINGS of THE CORPORATION 
and THE MANAGERS 



The Annual Meeting of 'The Corporation of Haverford College' 
is held on the second third-day in the Tenth month, at 3 o'clock p.m. 



The Stated Meetings of the Managers for 1944 will be held on the 
third Sixth-day of First, Third, Fifth, Ninth and Eleventh months. 



LEGACIES 

The friends of the College, including former students, and all who are 
interested in the promotion of sound learning, are invited to consider the 
College in the disposition of their estates by will. 



FORM OF BEQUEST OF PERSONAL PROPERTY 

/ give and bequeath, free and clear of all estate, inheritance or other 
similar taxes, unto the Corporation of Haverford College, the sum of 
Dollars. 



FORM OF DEVISE OF REAL ESTATE 

/ give and devise, free and clear of all estate, inheritance or other 
similar taxes, unto The Corporation of Haverford College, its Successors and 
Assigns, in fee, the following described real estate: (Description). 



forty-seven] 



No A^thletic number pw.blisKe4 




HAVERFORD COLLEGE 
BULLETIN 

DIRECTORY ISSUE 



Vol. XLIII 


October, 1944 




No. 1 


For ^''' t o 1 v^ t: 1 , L o FACULTY AND STAFF 






■Report 








Name ' 


Address 


■ 


Telephone 




Haverford, unless 


Ardmore exchar^e 




otherwise noted 


unless otherwise 








noted 


AUendoerfer, Carl B. 


750 Rugby Road, Bryn Mawr 


B.M.2568 J 


Asensio, Mrs. Manuel J. 


2 College Lane 




4163 


Benham, T. A. 


3 College Lane 




6044 


Cadbury, William E., Jr. 


791 College Ave. 




0203 W 


Caselli, Aldo 


Merion Hall 




9458 


Comfort, Howard 


5 College Circle 




3732 


Comfort, William W. 


South Walton Road 




0455 


Drake, Thomas E. 


702 Pennstone Rd., Bryn Mawr 


B.W 


[.1534 


Dunn^ Emmett, R. 


748 Rugby Rd., Bryn Mawr 






Evans, Arlington 


324 Boulevard, Brookline, 








Upper Darby 


Hilltop 


2043 


Evans, Francis Cope 


1 College Lane 




4049 W 


Fetter, Frank W. 


5 Canterbury Lane, St. Davids 


Wayne 


2449 J 


FitzGerald, Alan S. 


Warick Rd. & Cotswold Lane, 








Wynnewood 




1404 


Flight, John W. 


753 College Avenue 




4409 W 


FosS; Martin 


la College Lane 




1599 


Gibb, Thomas C. 


824 Buck Lane 




6949 W 


Green, Louis C. 


791 College Avenue 




4409 J 


Haddleton, A. W. 


29 Tenmore Road 


aM.1235 W 


Henry, Howard K. 


1464 Drayton Lane, Penn Wynne 




3913 J 


Hepp, Maylon H. 


East Founders Hall 




9460 


Herndon, John G. 


1 College Lane 




0364 


Hetzel, Theodore B. 


768 College Avenue 




4393 W 


Holmes, Clayton W. 


720 Millbrook Lane 




4269 W 


Johnston, Robert J. 


Woodside Cottage 




3725 


Jones, Rufus 


2 College Circle 




2777 


Kelly, John A. 


3 College Lane 




4160 


Lockwood, Dean P. 


6 College Circle 




1402 J 


Lunt, William E. 


5 College Lane 




1507 W 


Macintosh, Archibald 


3 College Circle 




0961 


Meldrum, William B. 


747 College Avenue 




0881 J 


Morley, Felix 


1 College Circle 




4712 


Oakley, Cletus O. 


Featherbed Lane 




3109 W 


Palmer, Frederic, Jr. 


1 College Lane 




6878 



Issued four times a year by 

HAVERFORD COLLEGE, HAVERFORD, PA. 

Application for entry as second class mail is pending 



Name 



Pepinsky, Abraham 
Pfund, Harry W. 
Post, Amy L. 
Post, L. Arnold 
Rantz, J. Otto 
Rittenhouse, Leon H. 
Sargent, Ralph M. 
Scaife, Mary L. 
Snyder, Edward D. 
Steere, Douglas V. 
Stinnes, Edmund H. 
Stone, Brinton H. 
Sutton, Richard M. 

Swan, Alfred 
Taylor, Dr. Herbert W. 
Teaf, Howard M., Jr. 
Watson, Frank D. 
Williamson, Alexander J. 
Wills, William Mintzer 

Wilson, Albert H. 
Wylie, Laurence W. 



Address 


Telephone 


Haverford , unless 


Ardmore exchange 


otherwise noted 


unless otherwise 




noted 


7 College Lane 


5324 


624 Overhill Rd., Ardmore 


5532 


C-3 Dreycott Apts. 


1643 M 


9 College Lane 


0258 M 


2122 Chestnut Ave., Ardmore 




6 College Lane 


5522 


4 College Circle 


3339 


E-4 Haverford Gables 


5117 


36 Railroad Avenue 


0712 


739 College Avenue 


0162 


751 Millbrook Lane 


6759 


774 Millbrook Lane 


5555 W 


785 College Avenue, facing 




Walton Road 


0742 W 


3 College Lane 


1562 


457 Lancaster Avenue 


2383 


3 College Lane 


4049 J 


773 College Avenue 


2937 


4 College Lane 


4023 


B-201 Merion Garden Apts., 




Merion, Pa. 


Merion 4760 


765 College Avenue 


1853 


Government House 


9613 



MILITARY STAFF 

3327 Service Unit - ASTP Premedical Unit 

Capt. Ralph J. Henry, Inf., Commanding Officer 
911 Hagysford Rd., Penn Valley 



Cynwyd 0903 R 



Permanent Party - Enlisted Personnel 
Telephone - Ardmore 4066 

S/Sgt. J. Hunter McDowell 

723' Windermere Ave., Drexel Hill, Pa. 
Sgt. Richard R. Bullock 

Box 634, Farmington, N. Mex. 
Cpl. Stanley F. Janiak 

2700 Oakley Way, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Pfc. Frank Soda 

7128 Van Dyke St., Philadelphia 35, Pa. 



COLLEGE OFFICE AND BUILDING TELEPHONES 

Unless otherwise noted, all telephones below may be reached 
by calling Ardmore 6400 

Academic Director, Premedical ASTP, W. B. Meldrum 
Admissions, Archibald Macintosh, Director 
Administrative Secretary, Mary L. Scaife 
Alumni Office, Brinton H. Stone, Secretary 

Army Specialized Training Unit, Barclay Hall 4066 

Army Units, Academic Records Office 
Assistant to the President, Brinton H. Stone 

Barclay Hall, North (Pay Station) 9506 

Barclay Hall, Center (Pay Station) 9459 

Barclay Hall, South (Pay Station) 9508 

Biology Laboratory (Sharpless Hall) 

Business Office, Aldo Caselli, Bursar 

Bucky Foundation Office, R & R Unit 

Chemistry Laboratory (Profs. Meldrum, W. E. Cadbury) 

Coordinator of Army Units, H. M. Teaf, Jr. 

Dean's Office, Thomas C. Gibb, Acting Dean 

Engineering Laboratory (Hilles) 

Faculty Secretary (at Alumni Office) 

Founders Hall, East (Pay Station) . . 9460 

Founders Hall, Dormitory (Pay Station) 9533 

French Department Office 

Government House, 8 College Lane (Pay Station) 9613 

Gymnasium (Pay Station) 9512 

Gyn^nasium Office 

Haverford News 4894 

Haverford Review, Brinton H. Stone, Managing Editor 
Hilles Laboratory of Applied Science (Engineering) 

(Profs. Hetzel, Holmes & Mr. Rantz) 
Infirmary, Mabel S. Beard, R. N. 

Kitchen (Pay Station) 9544 

Language House, Manuel J. Asensio, Director (Pay Station) 9428 

Library: D. P. Lockwood, Librarian 

Amy L. Post 

Circulation Desk 

Thomas E. Drake 

Anna B. Hewitt (Treasure Room) 

Lloyd Hall, 3rd Entry (Kinsey) Rooms 1-12 (Pay Station) 9520 

Lloyd Hall, 5th Entry (Strawbridge) Rooms 13-26 (Pay Station) 9514 

Lloyd Hall, 8th Entry (Leeds) Rooms 27-38 (Pay Station) 9628 

Merion Hall ' 9458 

Observatory 

Physics Laboratory (Sharpless Hall) 

Power House (After 5:00 P.M. - Ardmore 9540 - Pay Station) 

President, Felix Morley 

Reconstruction and Relief Office 

Registrar, W. M. Wills 

Research Laboratory, Alan S. FitzGerald, Director 5092 

Romance Language Department Office 

Science House, 521 Panmure Road (Pay Station) 9523 

Sharpless Hall: T. A. Benham, H. Comfort, F. C. Evans, 
H. K. Henry, A. Pepinsky, R. M. Sutton 



steward, Charles Byles 

Superintendent, R. J. Johnston 

Vice-President, Archibald Macintosh 

Whitall Hall: Profs. J. W. Flight, Maylon H. Hepp, J. G. Herndon, J. A. Kelly, 

William E. Lunt, D. V. Steere, H. M. Teaf, Jr., Frank D. Watson, 

H. W. Pfund, R. M. Sargent, E. D. Snyder. 



FACULTY OFFICE TELEPHONES 

The office of each of the following Members of the Faculty may be reached 
by calling Ardmore 6400 only during the hours when there is an operator at the 
switchboard. 



Benham 


Gibb 


Lockwood 


Snyder 


Cadbury 


Green 


Lunt 


Steere 


Comfort, H. 


Haddleton 


Meldrum 


Sutton 


Dunn 


Henry, H.K. 


Oakley 


Teaf 


Drake 


Hepp 


Pepinsky 


Watson 


Evans, F.C. 


Herndon 


Pfund 


Wilson 


Flight 


Holmes 


Sargent 


Wylie 


Foss 


Kelly 







COLLEGE TELEPHONE SERVICE 

When there is no operator at the switchboard, service can be had only on 
the five numbers given below to the telephones listed beside them. When there 
is an operator on duty (usually 9:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. Monday through Friday, 
9:00 A.M. to 1:00 P.M. on Saturday, none Sunday) any one of these same five 
numbers will reach the switchboard, and from there via the operator any of the 
Campus telephones; except the pay stations, which are listed in this Directory. 

Ardmore 6400 Haverford Library; Superintendent Johnston 

" 6401 Vice-President, Dean, Army Academic Office, Bursar. 

(Macintosh, Gibb, Teaf, Caselli) 

" 6402 Hilles Laboratory; Dr. Sutton's office in Sharpless 



3036 Infirmary 

3761 President Morley's office 



DIRECTORY 

STUDENTS IN THE COLLEGE 

In the last column is given the number of the student's dormitory room; F 
for Founders Hall, G.H. for Government House, L.H. for Language House, L for 
Lloyd Hall, D for day student. The field of major concentration is indicated in 
parentheses. The figure following the name indicates the number of the term now 
laeing completed. Day student's home telephones are listed beneath their addresses. 

Division into undergraduate terms and graduate departments will be found 
in Part Two. 

PART ONE 

CIVILIAN STUDENTS 

(Alphabetically Arranged) 

Name Home Address College Address 

A 

ADAMS, James Fowler, Jr., 3 29 L 

2900 Harrison Street, Wilmington 270, Del. 
ALENICK, Monroe Edward, 2 37 L 

292 Eastern Parkway, Newark 6, N. J. 
ATKESON, Timothy Breed, 2 18 L 

3673 Upton St., N.W., Washington 8, D.C. 

B 

BAILEY, M. Omar, 2 12 L 

160 N. Main St., West Hartford 7, Conn. 
BAKER, Robert Knoche, 1 35 L 

355 Columbia Avenue, Palmerton, Pa. 
BARKER, William Pierson, U, 2 30 F 

1553 Shorb Ave., N.W., Canton 3, Ohio 
BARLOW, Robert, 1 Day 

CPS 49, Cottage 5, Phila. State Hospital, Phila. 14, Pa. 
BEARDSLEY, John Post, 7 (English) 14 L 

1919 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
BELL, William Warren, 2 25 L 

4409 Greenwich Parkway, N.W., Washington 7, D.C. 
BELOOF, Robert, 6 Day 

CPS 49, Cottage 1, Phila. State Hospital, Phila. 14, Pa. 
BERNSTEIN, Daniel Seymour, 2 36 L 

3700 Hilton Road, Baltimore 15, Md. 
BIRDSALL, Joseph Cooper, Jr., 1 20 L 

139 Booth Lane, Haverford, Pa. 
BLUM, Kenneth Richard, 2 36 L 

1185 Park Avenue, New York 28, N. Y. 
BOUZARTH, William Francis, II, 2 11 L 

635 Belair Avenue, Aberdeen, Md. 
BRAWNER, David Montgomery, 2 32 L 

107 Highland Drive, Chevy Chase, Md. 
BROWN, Rodman Weld, 4 Merion 

416 Linden Street, Wellesley Hills, Mass. 



Name Home Address College Address 

BUTTRICK, David Gardner, 1 

21 E. 79th St., New York City 9 F 



CAMERON, Angus Malcolm, 7 (Chemistry) 21 L 

318 - 8th Avenue, S.E., Minot, N. D. 
CAVELL, Matthew Stuart, 2 37 L 

1125 S.E. First Street, Evansville 9, Ind. 
CLAYTON, Robert Francis, Jr., 4 1 L 

49 E. Providence Road, Lansdowne, Pa. 
COFFIN, Lewis Edward, 7 (Chemistry) 5 F 

150 Church Street, Newton 58, Mass. 
COLLINS, Benjamin McVickar, 1 16 L 

Broadlea Farm, Rhinebeck, N. Y. 
COOK, Edward Marshall, Jr., 7 (Physics) Day 

56 Cedarbrook Road, Ardmore, Pa. 

Hilltop 5690 
CULBERT, Craig Dunlap, 1 Day 

26 Chatham Road, Ardmore, Pa. 



DAUDON, Marc Daniel, 2 * Day 

623 Walnut Lane, Haverford, Pa. 

Ardmore 0986 W 
DAVIS, Alan Marvin, 5 (Chemistry) 21b F 

205 W. 89th St., New York, N. Y. 
DOMINCOVICH, Paul Henry, 8 (R & R) 15 L 

236 W. School Lane, Germantown, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Ardmore 5562 
DORN, Richard Kenneth, 1 Day 

6140 Nassau Road, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Greenwood 2618 
DOWBINSTEIN, Israel Morris, 5 (Chemistry) Day 

3211 N. 17th St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Radcliff 2406 
DRAKE, Charles Daniel, 2 22 F 

47 Main St., Franklin, N. J. 



ECROYD, Henry, Jr., 4 (Engineering) 17 F 

226 Lenoir Ave., Wayne, Pa. 
EDGERTON, Charles Willis, Jr., 1 10 L 

College Avenue, Haverford, Pa. 
ELLIOTT, Ralph Menges, 2 30 F 

19 Grace Court, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
EWELL, Albert Hunter, Jr., 6 (Psychology) 38 L 

4937 Walton Ave., Philadelphia 43, Pa. 

F 

FLAHERTY, Joseph Paul, 1 Day 

286 Trent Road, Penn Wynne, Montg. Co., Pa. 
Ardmore 5730 



Name 



Home Address 



FLEMING, Thomas Talbot, 2 

Valley Green Road, Flourtown, Pa. 

Whitemarsh 3233 
FREEMAN, Murray Fox, 3 

324 N. Bowman Avenue, Merion, Pa. 

Merion 1198 



College Address 
Day 

Day 



GANTER, Robert Lewis, 1 

830 Elsinore Place, Chester, Pa. 
GEOFFROY, Charles Henry, 2 

509 Wilde Avenue, Drexel Hill, Pa. 

Clearbrook 7828 
GERLACH, Thomas Bradfield, 1 

1526 N. 15th St., Philadelphia 29, Pa. 
GILMOUR, Richard Malcolm, 2 

249 Green Ave., Lansdowne, Pa. 
GOOD, Robert Crocker, 7 (Philosophy) 

419 Homestead Ave., Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 
GORHAM, William Kane, HI, 1 

3346 Tilden St., Philadelphia 29, Pa. 
GREGSON, E. Wesley, 7 (Philosophy) 

758 Beechwood Road, Beechwood, Upper Darby, Pa. 

Ardmore 0761 R 
GROSS, Gerald Connop, Jr., 4 

3130 Wisconsin Averiue, N.W., Washington, D. C. 
GROSS, Sheldon Harley, 7 (History) 

Quarters 15a, Fort Myer, Va. 
GROSSMAN, Alfred Durant, 2 

10 Wakeman Place, Larchmont, N. Y. 
GRUBB, J. Spenser, 1 

420 Meadowbrook Ave., St. Davids, Pa. 
GUNNISON, Foster, Jr., 1 

R. D. 2, Carmel, N. Y. 

H 

HARDEN, Robert Schermerhorn, 1 

341 E. Main Street, Moorestown, N. J. 
HARRIS, William Hamilton, 2 

204 N. 17th St., Camp Hill, Pa. 
HAUSER, John Norman, 1 

7443 Oakhill Avenue, Wauwatosa, Wis. 
HAWKINS, Lee Wyeth, 2 

Marionville, Missouri 
HENNE, John Kraffert, 4 

332 W. Oak St., Titusville, Pa. 
HERTER, Theophilus John, 7 (Philosophy) 

232 Wendover Drive, Westgate Hills, Upper Darby, Pa. 

Hilltop 1016 
HILTNER, Theodore Martin, 7 (Philosophy) 

4215 E. 33rd Street, Seattle, Wash. 
HOPKINS, Frank Thomas, 2 

316 Thornhill Road, Baltimore 12, Md. 



10 L 


Day 


10 F 


18 L 


3 F 


31 L 


Day 


14 F 


33 L 


19 L 


30 L 


23 L 



28 L 


26 L 


30 L 


32 L 


32 L 


Day 


Gym 


11 L 



Name 



Home Address 



HUEBSCH, Ian, 4 

285 Central Park, West, New York 24, N. Y. 
HUTCHINS, James Sewall, Jr., 7 (Philosophy) 

529 Montgomery Avenue, Haverford, Pa. 
HUTCHINSON, Ernest Charles, 1 

101 Grandview Road, Ardmore, Pa. 

Ardmore 0575 W 



I 



IHRIG, Judson LaMoure, 1 

2611 E. Beverly Road, Milwaukee 11, Wis. 



J 



JACOB, James Archibald, Jr., 2 

1310 Pleasant Ave., Wellsburg, W. Va. 
JACOBS, George Wayne, Jr., 4 

25 Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y. 
JOHNSON, David, 5 (Philosophy) 

18 W. 122nd St., New York, N. Y. 
JOHNSON, James Dexter, 1 

250 S. Brentwood, Clayton, Mo. 
JOHNSON, Richard Schaper, 1 

328 W. 22nd Street, Erie, Pa. 



K 



KATCHEN, Julius, 5 (Philosophy) 

2 Hollywood Avenue, West Long Branch, N. J. 
KATO, Walter Yoneo, 5 (Physics) 

5210 Winthrop Avenue, Chicago 40, 111. 
KENNEDY, Francis Richard, 6 (Physics) 

810 High St., Paris, Kentucky 
KIMMICH, Homer, 1 

505 Lancaster Ave., Haverford, Pa. 
KINDLER, Don, 1 

Jessups, Md. 
KONOWITZ, David Bernard, 3 

85-21 Homelawn St., Jamaica, L.L, N.Y. 



College Address 
7 F 
Day 
Day 



15 F 

30 F 

14 L 

15 L 
21 F 
28 L 

38 L 
19 F 
15 L 
Day 
13 F 
7a F 



LANGSTON, Thomas Dinsmore, 2 

621 Malvern Road, Ardmore, Pa. 

Ardmore 6715 
LEVENSOHN, Alan Mark, 1 

36 Dolphin Rd., Newton Centre, Mass. 
LONG, David E., 7 (International Government) 

1522 Cleveland Ave., Wyomissing, Pa. 



M 



MAKEL, John Selby, 1 

Hdq. 8th Service Command, Dallas, Texas 



Day 

34 L 
3 L 



21 F 



9 



Name Home Address College Address 

MANN, Philip Carl, 2nd, 7 (Government) 16 L 

116 East Riverbank, Beverly, N. J. 
MATHIS, James Leslie, 1 22 F 

R. D. 1, Wyalusing, Pa. 
MEAD, Brian, Jr., 2 27 L 

11 Horseguard Lane, Scarsdale, N. Y. 
MEYERS, Robert Weigel, 3 4 L 

132 W. 9th St., Erie, Pa. 
MILLER, William Henry, 2 2 F 

7703 Crossland Road, Baltimore 8, Md. 
MOORE, Charles Byrd, 1 16 F 

25 Amherst Ave., Swarthmore, Pa. 
MOSES, Charles Henry Mann, Jr., 4 Day 

433 Haverford Road, Wynnewood, Pa. 

Ardmore 4396 
MUENCH, James Frederick, 5 3 L 

300 Riverside Drive, New York 25, N.Y. 

N 

NEWMAN, Paul Freedman, 2 11 L 

7 Balfour Circle, Lansdowne, Pa. 
NOFER, George Hancock, 2nd, 3 Day 

632 W. Elkins Ave., Philadelphia 20, Pa. 

Hancock 3220 
NORTON, Richard William, Jr., 8 (Spanish) Day 

Haverford Court, Haverford, Pa. 

Ardmore 0947 



OLIVIER, Daniel Dretzka, 1 6 F 

Box 306, R. D. 2, Phoenixville, Pa. 
OPPENHEIMER, Martin J., 2 19 L 

3506 Bancroft Rd., Baltimore 15," Md. 
OSWALD, David Statton, 1 13 L 

826 The Terrace, Hagerstown, Md. 



PAYRO, Roberto Pablo, 5 2 L 

Lavalle 357, Buenos Aires, Argentina 
PEASE, William, 2 31 L 

207 Bloomfield Ave., Hartford, Conn. 
PETERS, David Alexander, 2 23 L 

45 N. 11th St., Allentown, Pa. 
PETERSEN, Hans Eberhard, 5 (Greek) Merion 

145 - 95th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
POWER, Richard Wilson, 1 14 F 

25 Pine St., Canton, N. Y. 

R 

RIVERS, Richard D., 5 (Physics) 11 F 

1281 Everett Ave., Louisville, Ky. 



10 



Name Home Address College Address 

ROCHE, Robert Pearson, 5 (English) 1 L 

111 - 7th Street, Garden City, L.I., N.Y. 
ROOSEVELT, Dirck, 1 34 L 

9 Sutton Place, New York City 
ROSENTHAL, David Richard, 2 33 L 

2154 Mt. Royal Terrace, Baltimore 17, Md. 
RUTLEDGE, Neal Person, 1 22 L 

4928 Indian Lane, Washington 16, D.C. 
RYAN, Thomas Joseph, 7 (English) 20 L 

1216 Lindale Avenue, Drexel Hill, Pa. 



SANDERS, Martin, 4 4 L 

55 Clinton Place, Bronx, New York, N.Y. 
SATO, Jyuichi, 6 (Physics) Day 

c/o Dr. Frank Watson 

773 College Avenue, Haverford, Pa. 

Ardmore 2937 
SEGAL, Marvin, 2 Day 

729 Snyder Ave., Philadelphia 48, Pa. 

Dewey 6687 
SETTLE, Lyle G., 2 20 F 

Dryden, N. Y. 
SNODGRASS, Francis Mattlage, 1 35 L 

Windfall, R.D. 1, Martinsburg, W. Va. 
STARKWEATHER, Howard Warner, Jr., 4 29 L 

815 Augusta Rd., Wilmington 67, Del. 
STEEFEL, Lawrence D., Jr., 5 (German) 21 L 

2808 West River Road, Minneapolis, Minn. 
STIMSON, Arthur H., 3 Day 

8 Simpson Rd., Ardmore, Pa. 

Ardmore 2258 
STONE, John Alexander, 1 4 F 

319 W. 88th St., Apt. 8, New York City 
STUART, John Walker, 8 (Biology) Day 

Apt. B-1 Thornbrook Manor Apts. 

819 Montgomery Avenue, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Bryn Mawr 1533 
STURR, George Bowler Tullidge, 5 (Government) 17 L 

129 Fourth Ave., Haddon Heights, N. J. 



THOMAS, David Edward, 1 Day 

518 Foss Avenue, Drexel Hill, Pa. 
THOMPSON, Daniel Bard, 3 22 L 

110 S. Broad St., Waynesboro, Pa. 
THOMPSON, William James MuUins, 3 26 L 

926 Elk St., Franklin, Pa. 
TURLEY, Keith Harold, 2 25 L 

501 Camden Avenue, Moorestown, N. J. 
TUTTLE, Edwin Ellsworth, 2 27 L 

76 Hillcrest Avenue, Summit, N. J. 



11 



Name 



Home Address 
V 



VEDOVA, Harold Frederick, 1 

1463 Hampstead Rd., Penn Wynne, Philadelphia 31, Pa. 
Ardmore 3750 R 

W 

WALTERS, James Donald, 3 

90 Brite Avenue, Scarsdale, N. Y. 
WHEELER, Edward Stubbs, 2 

Route 3, Greencastle, Pa. 
WHITCOMB, Harold Clark, Jr., 2 

337 N. 25th St., Camp Hill, Pa. 
WHITEHEAD, H. Macy, 5 (Philosophy) 

R. D. 1, South Windham, Maine 
WHITMAN, John Turner, 2 

Nashawtuc Hill, Concord, Mass. 
WINGERD, Robert Aitken, 2 

Edgar Avenue and Riddle Road, Chambersburg, Pa. 



College Address 



Day 



2 L 
24 L 
13 L 

1 F 
12 L 
24 L 



ZWEIFLER, Nathan Joseph, 2 

46 Wilbur Ave., Newark, N. J. 



12 L 



Name 



RECONSTRUCTION AND RELIEF UNIT 



Home Address 



College Address 



ANDERSON, Ruth Agnes (A.B., Wellesley, 1941) 
1945 Second Ave., S.E., Cedar Rapids, la. 

ATKINSON, Anna Margaret (A.B., Brown, 1942) 
Wrightstown, Pa. 



B 



BARCLAY, Mary (A.B., Middlebury, 1943) 

424 N. Bluff, Wichita, Kansas 
BARLOW, Joan H. (A.B., Grinnell, 1944) 

157 Sheldon Ave., Ames, la. 
BROOKS, Charlotte Hallowell (A.B., Smith, 1942) 

45 Mystic St., West Medford, Mass. 
BROWN, Sydney Thomson (B.A., Smith, 1943) 

99 Claremont Ave., New York, N. Y. 



G. H. 

L. H. 

L. H. 

G. H. 

L. H. 

L. H. 



12 

Name Home Address College Address 

C 

GARY, Sarah Comfort (A.B., Vassar, 1940) L. H. 

Ellet Lane and.Wissahickpn Ave., Mt. Airy, Phila., Pa. 
CUNNINGHAM^ Nancy Louise (B.A.; Smith, 1944) G. H. 

214 Forest Park Blvd., Janesville, Wis. 

D 

DRISCOLL, Ruth Antoinette L- H. 

1629 Asbury Ave., Evanston, 111. 



FEISE, Dorelen (B.A., Oberlin, 1944) G. H. 

401 Rosebank Ave., Baltimore, Md. 
FOWLE, Helen Joy (B.A., Wellesley, 1943) L. H. 

Thetford, Vermont 
FREEMAN, Charles (B.A., Wake Forest College, 1942) Day 

(M.A., University of N. C, 1944) 

Pendle Hill, Wallingford, Pa. 

(Old Fayetteville Road, Raleigh, N. C.) 
FREYHOF, Betty Keith, {A.B., Wellesley, 1944) G. H. 

3819 Clifton Ave., Cincinnati 20, Ohio 



GARRISON, Elizabeth B. (A.B., Swarthmore, 1938) L. H. 

Cedarville, N. J. 
GEDNEY, Eloise (A.B., Flora Stone Mather, 1942) G. H. 

117 Maplewood Ave., Maplewood, N. J. 
GILDEMEISTER, Maria Luisa (A.B., Haverford, 1944) L. H. 

Casilla Correo 678, Lima, Peru 
GOODIER, .Richard Barritt (A. B., Brown, 1935) F. H. 

(S.T.B., The Biblical Seminary in 
New York, 1938) 
(M.A., Drew Seminary, 1943) 

445 High St., Lonsdale, R. I. 
GRAHAM, Carolyn (B.A., H. Sophie Newcomb, 1944) G. H. 

7821 Freret St., New Orleans 18, La. 
GRANT, Barbara Stevens (A.B., Colby, 1943) ' G. H. 

75 Coleman Road, Wethersfield, Conn. 

H 

HAGGARD, Barbara A. (A.B., Wells, 1943) G. H. 

3100 Warrington Road, Shaker Heights, Ohio 
HOLMES, Barbara Ristine (A.B., Wells, 1942) G. H. 

2734 N. Stowell Ave., Milwaukee 11, Wis. 
HOVEY, Sarah Edith (A.B., Reed, 1944) c/o Dr. H. Comfort 

833 34th Ave., N., Seattle, Washington 

I 

ISGRIG, Aimee Margaret (A.B., Rockford, 1944) G. H. 

1547 Upper Parkway, Wauwatosa, Wis. 



13 

Name Home Address College Address 

J 

JONES, Annette Roberts (B.A., Wellesley, 1941) L. H. 

(M. Ed., Winnetka, 1942) 
272 Vine Avenue, Highland Park, 111. 

K 

KNIGHT, Bernice Eva (B.A., Colby, 1944) G. H. 

County Road, Westbrook, Maine 
KRANCER, Priscilla (B.A., Vassar, 1942) L. H. 

c/o Captain Sprague, St. Albans Hospital, L.I., N.Y. 



LANGSTON, Martha Porter {A.B., Scripps, 1937) L. H. 

1844 Pepper Drive, Altadena, California 
LITCHMAN, Jean M. (A.B., University of Washington, 1943) G. H. 

408 E. 50th St., Seattle, Washington 

M 

MORRISON, Esther (B.S., Miss. State, 1938) Day 

(M.S., U. of Louisville, 1940) 
17 Railroad Avenue, Haverford, Pa. 
(3111 Drummond St., Vicksburg, Miss.) 



PLUMB, Lois Virginia (B.A., Wilson College, 1943) L. H. 

20 Primrose Ave., Tuckahoe, N. Y. 
POHL, Claudine Blanche (A.B., Oberlin, 1944) G. H. 

215 W. 83rd St., New York, N. Y. 

R 

RIGSBEE, Alfred Swain (A.B., Earlham, 1944) Day 

Pendle Hill, Wallingford, Pa. 

("The Maples", Arlington, Ind.) 
RUSSELL, Florence O. (A.B., Scripps, 1944) G. H. 

1811 El Encanto Rd., Santa Barbara, Calif. 



SHORTER, Fred Claiborne (A.B., Reed, 1944) F. H. 

3208 Franklin Ave., Seattle 2, Wash. 



TAFT, Rebekah L. (A.B., Bryn Mawr, 1933) G. H. 

Gray Farm, Salem St., Andover, Mass. 

W 

WEHMEYER, Jean Adele (B.A., Smith, 1943) L. H. 

R. D. S., Clinton Corners, N. Y. 



14 



Name 



I 



Home Address 



WILHELM, Frederick Oscar (B.A., Wesleyan, 1944) 
Pendle Hill, Wallingford, Pa. 
(Box 35, North Granby, Conn.) 
WILLIAMS, Mary.Esther (B.A., Vassar, 1943) 

1317 Bishop Road, Grosse Points, Michigan 
WILLIAMS, Mrs. Robert K. (Miriam) (B. of Arch., 

(Ala. Poly. Inst., 1935) 
2300 St. Stephen's Road, Mobile 17, Ala. 
WILLIAMS, Wendell W. (A.B., College of Emporia, 1938) 
(M.A., University of Kansas, 1941) 
(M.S., George Williams College, 1942) 
Pendle Hill, Wallingford, Pa. 
(Route #1, Emporia, Kansas) 
WYLIE, Anne Stiles (B.S., Simmons, 1943) 

270 Brookline Ave., Boston, Mass. 
WYLIE, Laurence William (A.B. & M.A., Indiana, 1931, 1933) 

(Ph. D., Brown University, 1940) 
270 Brookline Ave., Boston, Mass. 



College Address 
Day 

L. H. 
G. H. 

Day 

G. H. 
G. H. 



Domincovich .... 15 L 



Beardsley 14 L 

Cameron 21 L 

Coffin 5 F 

Cook Day 

Gregson Day 

Beloof Day 

Ewell 38 L 

Davis, A 21b F 

Dowbinstein .... Day 

Johnson, D 15 L 

Katchen 38 L 



Brown Merion 

Clayton 1 L 

Ecroyd 17 F 

Gross, G.C 14 F 



PART TWO 
8th Term (3) 
Norton Day 

7th Term (13) 

Gross, S.H 33 L 

Hiltner Gym 

Herter Day 

Hutchins Day 

Long 3 L 

6th Term (4) 

Kennedy 15 L 



5th Term (13) 

Kato 19 F 

Muench 3 L 

Payro 2 L 

Petersen Merion 

Rivers IIF 

4th Term (10) 

Henne 32 L 

Huebsch 7 F 

Jacobs, G 14 L 



I 

Stuart, Day 

Good 3 p 

Mann 16 L 

Ryan 20 L 

I 

Sato Day 



Roche 1 L 

Steefel 21 L 

Sturr 17 L 

Whitehead .... IF 



Moses Day 

Sanders 4 L 

Starkweather ... 29 L 



15 



Adams 29 L 

Freeman Day 

Konowitz 7a F 

Alenick 37 L 

Atkeson 18 L 

Bailey 12 L 

Barker 30 F 

Bell 25 L 

Bernstein 36 L 

Blum 36 L 

Bouzarth 11 L 

Brawner 32 L 

Caveil 37 L 

Daudon Day 

Drake 22 F 

Elliott 30 F 

Baker 35 L 

Barlow Day 

Birdsall 20 L 

Buttrick 9 F 

Collins 16 L 

Culbert Day 

Dorn Day 

Edgerton 10 L 

Flaherty Day 

Ganter 10 L 

Gerlach 10 F 

Gorham 31 L 



PART TWO (cent.) 

3rd Term (9) 

Meyers 4 L 

Nofer Day 

Stimson Day 

2nd Term (38) 

Fleming Day 

Geoff roy Day 

Gilmour 18 L 

Grossman 19 L 

Harris 26 L 

Hawkins 32 L 

Hopkins 11 L 

Jacob 30 F 

Langston Day 

Mead 27 L 

Miller 2 F 

Newman 11 L 

Oppenheimer ... 19 L 

1st Term (35) 

Grubb 30 L 

Gunnison 23 L 

Harden 28 L 

Hauser 30 L 

Hutchinson Day 

Ihrig 15 F 

Johnson, J.D 21 F 

Johnson, R 28 L 

Kimmich Day 

Kindler 13 F 

Levensohn 34 L 

Makel 21 F 



Thompson.D.B. . 22 L 

Thompson, W.J.M. 26 L 

Walters 2 L 

Pease 31 L 

Peters 23 L 

Rosenthal .... 33 L 

Segal Day 

Settle 20 F 

Turley 25 L 

Tuttle 27 L 

Wheeler 24 L 

Whitcomb .... 13 L 

Whitman 12 L 

Wingerd 24 L 

Zweifler 12 L 



Mathis 22 F 

Moore 16 F 

Olivier 6 F 

Oswald 13 L 

Power 14 F 

Roosevelt 34 L 

Rutledge 22 L 

Snodgrass .... 35 L 

Stone 4 F 

Thomas Day 

Vedova Day 



FIRST GRADUATE RECONSTRUCTION AND RELIEF UNIT (17) 



Atkinson 
Barclay . 
Brooks . 
Brown . . 
Cary . . . 
DriscoU 



L.H. 
L.H. 
L.H. 
L.H. 
L.H. 
L.H. 



Fowle .... 
Garrison . . 
Gildemeister 

Jones 

Krancer . . . 
Langston . . 



L.H. 
L.H. 
L.H. 
L.H. 



L.H. 
L.H. 



Plumb 


. L.H 


Wehmeyer . . 


. L.H 


Williams, M.E 


. L.H 


Wylie, A.S. . 


. G.H 


Wylie, L.W. . 


. G.H 



SECOND GRADUATE RECONSTRUCTION AND RELIEF UNIT (25) 



Anderson. . 
Barlow . . . 
Cunnii^han* 
Feise .... 
Freeman . . 
Freyhof. . . 
Gedney . . . 
Goodier . . . 



G.H. 
G.H. 
G.H. 
G.H. 
Day 
G.H. 
G.H. 
F.H. 



Graham 
Grant . . 
Haggard 
Holmes 
Hovey . 
Isgrig . 
Knight . 
Litchman 
Morrison 



G.H. 


Pohl 


. G.H 


G.H. 


Rigsbee .... 


. Day 


G.H. 


Russell .... 


. G.H 


G.H. 


Shorter .... 


. F.H 


Day 


Taft 


. G.H 


G.H. 


Wilhelm. . . . 


. Day 


G.H. 


Williams, 




G.H. 


Mrs. R.K. 


. G.H 


Day 


Williams, W.W 


. . Day 



16 



ASTP PREMEDICAL TRAINEES 

Telephone - Ardmore 9508 
Barclay Hall, Center 



Name 

ASINOVSKY, Joseph 
BACKUS, John Warner 
CEBULKA, Peter Richard 
CHOJNACKI, Bernard 
CLARK, Randall Lee 
COYNE, John Francis, Jr. 
CURTIS, James LeRoy 
DELASHMUTT, Robert Eugene 
DORFMAN, Murray Lewis 
DROULARD, Kenneth Earl 
EFFINGER, Ceroid Joseph 
JOHNSON, David Halsey 
MALKIN, Robert S. 
McCAUGKEY, Richard Stone 
McHUGH, Daniel 
OGILVIE, Robert Jerrold 
SERGEANT, John H., Jr. 
SMITH, Edwin Robert 
SMITH, James Anthony 
SPENADER, Wayne Frank 
TANNER, Leonard Michael 
THRALL, Howard Curtis 
ULRICH, Christian Andrew 
WELLS, Mortimer Hall, Jr. 
YAMIN, Edward Robert 
ZAGORY. Conrad 



Home Address 

28 Morris St., Rochester, N.Y. 

2203 Grant Ave., Wilmington, DeL 

Hawk Run, Pa. 

3983 E. 74th St., Cleveland, Ohio 

520 N. Duke St., Lancaster, Pa. 

11 Cleaves St., Portland, Me. 

Wilton, Wis. 

326 Osman St., Bucyrus, Ohio 

1726 Davidson Ave., New York, N. Y. 

9207 Stone Rd., Algonac, Mich. 

430 W. Carey St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

237 Dorer Ave., Hillside, N.J. 

8631 112 St., Richmond Hill, N. Y. 

1112 Sheridan Dr., Danville, 111. 

159 Henderson St., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

59 Edgemoor Ave., Wellesley, Mass. 

39-61 65 St., Woodside, L.I., N.Y. 

23 E. 4th St., Mt. Vernon, N.Y. 

R.D. 1, Bainbridge Rd., Chagrin Falls, 0. 

1010 Third Ave., Mendota, 111. 

1206 S. 14th St., Cambridge, O. 

Box 75, Manilla, Ind. 

3951 N. Hoyne St., Chicago, 111. 

4 Brantwood Rd., Arlington, Mass. 

243 S. Grove St., Freeport, N.Y. 

223 White Rd., Mineola, L.I., N.Y. 



^t 



HAVERFO^D COLLEGE 

NOV 4 1944 



HAVERFORD, PA. 



u 



lit 




HAVERFORo coIlEGE 

<iAN 1 9 1945 

^AVERFORD. PA 



1944-1945 

CATALOG ISSUE 



VOLUME XLIII 



NOVEMBER 
1344 



NUMBER TWO 



Issued October, November, December, and February 



BY HAVERFORD COLLEGE 

Haverford, Pa. 
Second Class Permit Applied for. 



yyyyyyyyy>-yyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyy<f-^-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-i-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<A-<-<-< 



HAVERFORD COLLEGE 



Bulletin 



yyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyy 




■<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-(-<-i-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-^-< 



1944-1945 



HAVERFORD, PENNSYLVANIA 



■yyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyy':''-i-<-<-<-<-^-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-<-^-<-< 



1944 


July 


September 


November 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 












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August 


October 


December | 






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1945 


January 


May 


September 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


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February 


June 


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1946 


January 


March 


May 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


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February 


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CONTENTS 

Yearly Calendar 2 

College Calendar 4 

The College 7 

The Officers of the Corporation 11 

Board of Managers and Committees 12 

Faculty 14 

Officers of Administration 19 

Committees of the Faculty and Administration 20 

General Regulations 

Admission 21 

Application for Admission facing 21 

College Entrance Examination Board 22 

Courses of Study 23 

Major Concentration 24 

Degrees 29 

Reconstruction and Relief Unit 31 

Honors 31 

Prizes 33 

Grading of Students 38 

Delinquent Students 38 

Financial Arrangements 

Room, Board, and Tuition 40 

Scholarships and Fellowships 42 

Loan Fund and Employment Bureau 45 

General Information 

Library and Special Collections 46 

Concerts and Lectures 47 

Main Line Forum 48 

Bucky Foundation 49 

Infirmary 49 

Societies, Clubs, and Publications 49 

Preparation for Professions 51 

Courses of Instruction 55 

Degrees Conferred in 1943-1944 90 

Honors Awarded in 1943-1944 

Fellowships, Scholarships and Prizes 91 

Honor Societies 92 

Honors in Special Subjects 93 

Directory of Students, Faculty and Officers 94 

Alumni Associations 108 

Index 110 

3 



CALENDAR 

1944-1945 

Stated Meeting of the Board of Managers Sept. 22 

Registration of all new students Sept. 25 

Reporting of Freshmen to Mr. Macintosh Sept. 25 

Beginning of College Year with Assembly, 11:00 a.m Sept. 26 

Annual Meeting of the Corporation of Haverford College. . .Oct. 17 

Stated Meeting of the Board of Managers Nov. 17 

Thanksgiving Day Nov. 23 

Graduation of Army Pre-Medical Unit Nov. 30 

Last date for selection of Major Subjects by eligible students . Dec. 1 1 

Christmas Recess (dates inclusive) Dec. 21, 1944-Jan. 3, 1945 

Stated Meeting of the Board of Managers Jan. 5 

Last First Semester Classes Jan. 13 

Senior comprehensive examinations and course examina- 
tions for underclassmen* Jan. 17-20 

Course examinations for all classes Jan. 22-26 

Commencement Day Jan. 27 

Beginning of Second Semester, 8:00 a.m Jan. 29 

Stated Meeting of the Board of Managers Mar. 9 

Spring Recess (dates inclusive) Mar. 25-Apr. 1 

Last date for selection of Major Subjects by eligible students .Apr. 30 

Last date for submission of Prize Manuscripts Apr. 30 

Stated Meeting of the Board of Managers May 1 1 

Last Second Semester Classes May 19 

Senior comprehensive examinations and course examina- 
tions for underclassmen-j- May 23-26 

Course examinations May 28-June 1 

Commencement Day June 2 

* At the option of individual departments, comprehensive examinations may begin on Jan. 16. 
t At the option of individual departments, comprehensive examinations may begin on May 22. 



1944-1945 



CALENDAR 

Summer — 1945 

Beginning of Summer Term June 25, 1945 

Last date for selection of Major Subjects by students who 

have been in attendance three terms July 23 

Last Summer Term Classes Aug. 24 

Senior comprehensive examinations* Aug. 22-24 

Commencement Day ; Aug. 25 

* At the option of individual departments, comprehensive examinations may begin on August 21. 



CALENDAR 

1945-1946 

Stated Meeting of the Board of Managers Sept. 21 

Registration of all new students Sept. 24 

Beginning of College Year with Assembly, 9:00 a.m Sept. 25 

Annual Meeting of the Corporation of Haverford College at 

the College, 3:00 p.m Oct. 16 

Stated Meeting of the Board of Managers Nov. 16 

Thanksgiving Day Nov. 22 

Last date for selection of Major Subjects by students who 

have been in attendance three terms Dec. 10 

Christmas Recess (dates inclusive) Dec. 23, 1945-Jan. 6, 1946 

Stated Meeting of the Board of Managers Jan. 4 

Last First Semester Classes Jan. 19 

Senior comprehensive examinations* Jan. 23-25 

Course examinations Jan. 23-Feb. 1 

Commencement Day for Seniors Feb. 2 

Beginning of Second Semester, 8:00 a.m Feb. 4 

Stated Meeting of the Board of Managers Mar. 8 

Spring Recess (dates inclusive) March 24-31 

Last date for selection of Major Subjects by students who 

have been in attendance three terms Apr. 30 

Last date for submission of Prize Manuscripts Apr. 30 

Stated Meeting of the Board of Managers May 10 

Last Second Semester Classes May 25 

Senior comprehensive examinations! May 29-31 

Course examinations May 29-June 7 

Commencement Day for Seniors Jurie 8 

* At the option of individual departments, comprehensive examinations may begin on Jan. 22. 
f At the option of individual departments, comprehensive examinations may begin on May 28. 



HAVERFORD COLLEGE 



GENERAL DESCRIPTION 

HAVERFORD COLLEGE was foundcd in 1833. It owes its origin 
to the vision and energy of a few members of the Society of 
Friends who, in the spring of 1830, conceived the idea of 
founding an institution for education in the higher branches of learn- 
ing. The object, in the words of the founders, was "to combine 
sound and liberal instruction in literature and science with a 
religious care over the morals and manners, thus affording to the 
youth of our Society an opportunity of acquiring an education equal 
in all respects to that which can be obtained at colleges." 

The founders were incorporated in 1833, under the laws of the 
Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, into the Haverford School Asso- 
ciation, a body now known as the Corporation of Haverford College. 
This corporation elects a Board of Managers for the control of its 
affairs and for the administration of its funds. For the founding 
of the School sixty thousand dollars was raised. Since that time, 
by a number of generous bequests and donations, the amount of 
invested funds yielding income has been increased to over four 
million dollars. 

Haverford Station is on the main line of the Pennsylvania Rail- 
road, between Bryn Mawr and Ardmore, and is only twenty minutes 
from downtown Philadelphia by excellent suburban service. The 
College campus adjoins the famous Lancaster Pike (U. S. 30) and 
is two hours' train journey from New York or Baltimore; under 
three hours from Washington. Valley Forge is one of the many 
national shrines in the immediate vicinity. The cities of Trenton, 
Bethlehem, Allentown, Reading, Lancaster, Chester and Wilmington 
all lie within a radius of fifty miles. Whether for historic association, 
cultural advantage or physical accessibility, Haverford College is 
admirably situated. 

The original tract of 198 acres has since been increased to 216 
acres. While a portion is retained as farm and woodland, a lawn of 
sixty acres was long ago graded and tastefully planted with trees and 
shrubs by a landscape gardener, so that the natural beauty of the 
location has increased with passing years. The grounds include seven 

7 



8 Haverford College 

fields for football, baseball, cricket and soccer; a running-track, 
numerous tennis courts, and a pond for skating. 

Parallel with its material growth there have been changes in the 
inner life of the College which have affected the methods of admin- 
istration rather than the essential principles on which the institu- 
tion was founded. It has gradually increased in number of students, 
but with an enrollment limited to 400 still enjoys all the advantages 
of a small college. From the first it gave instruction of collegiate 
scope and grade. Accordingly, in 1856, the name was changed from 
school to college and the right to confer degrees was granted by the 
Legislature. In 1861 the preparatory department was abolished. 
General courses are now given in arts, science and engineering. 

The large endowment enables the College to maintain a faculty 
of unusual size in proportion to the number of students, and to 
expend for the instruction, board, and lodging of each student 
much more than he pays. The advantages of a central location are 
utilized by bringing to college assemblies, on frequent occasions, 
men and women who have established leadership in government, 
business and the professions. Particularly in the Social Sciences, 
where the seminar method is emphasized, theoretical instruction is 
frequently checked against the practical experience of visitors 
prominent in ofl&cial, industrial and professional life. 

Haverford students enjoy unusual liberty, safeguarded by their 
wholesome physical life, by the traditions of the College, and by 
the intimate association with their professors and fellow students. 
All examinations and tests are conducted under an Honor System 
administered by the Students' Association. Under the Honor Sys- 
tem no person, either student or faculty member, acts as official 
proctor during examinations. Responsible student self-government 
is further emphasized in every aspect of campus life. 

The religious tradition bequeathed by the Quaker founders has 
been carefully cherished, and high ideals of life and conduct are 
maintained. Three times a month the College attends Friends 
Meeting in a body. The aims of Haverford have been gradually 
developing and its function is becoming more and more clear — 
"to encourage the growth, among a limited number of young men, 
of vigorous bodies, scholarly minds, strong characters, and a real 
religious experience." 



History and Description 9 

A degree from Haverford College is in itself a certificate that the 
recipient is intellectually, morally, physically and socially equipped 
to play his part, and in time assume a post of leadership, in the 
occupation and community of his choosing. A good proportion of 
Haverford graduates, however, customarily desire to supplement 
this equipment with distinctly professional education. For students 
desiring intensive preliminary training in medicine, the law, engi- 
neering, and other highly specialized subjects, the College offers 
combinations of courses which admit to the best professional schools 
with full standing, and in many cases with advanced credit. 

Sample outlines of study at Haverford, preparatory to post- 
graduate specialization in all the major professions, have been 
prepared and may be obtained by application to the Director of 
Admissions. Whether or not he intends to proceed to graduate 
work the student will in all cases plan his course, and select his 
major subject, in consultation with faculty advisers. 

The first College building was Founders Hall, erected in 1833 
and, with additional wings, is still in active use. The original astro- 
nomical observatory was built in 1852 and in 1933 was replaced by 
the present newly-equipped structure. The new library, constructed 
in 1940-41, has special facilities for research and contains approxi- 
mately 164,000 volumes. 

There are four separate dormitories and, besides modern class- 
rooms, well-equipped laboratories for chemistry, physics, biology 
and engineering. The gymnasium was built in 1900; Roberts Hall, 
containing the college offices and a large auditorium, in 1903; the 
Haverford Union, used for many college activities, dates from 1910; 
the infirmary was built in 1912. In the summer of 1941 the college 
kitchens were completely modernized and a suitable campus dwell- 
ing was converted into a Language House with resident director. 
During the summer of 1942 another of the campus dwellings was 
remodeled into a Government House, which has rooms for fifteen 
students and an apartment for its director. Science House, opened 
in 1943, completes the trio of specialized student residences, the 
occupants of which have all the advantages of fraternity life without 
its social discrimination. 

In February, 1943, the College began the academic training of a 
Pre-Meteorology Unit for the Army Air Forces Technical Training 
Command, these student soldiers remaining in residence for a year. 
In September, 1943, an Army Specialized Training Unit was added, 
composed for the most part of Area and Language Study trainees. 
On the termination of this program Haverford received a small 



10 Haverford College 

Army Pre-Medical Unit, which graduated on November 30, 1944. 
A special Relief and Reconstruction Unit of women students, at 
graduate level, was established during the summer of 1943 and will 
be continued for the duration of the emergency. Civilian enrollment 
at the College stands up unusually well, in part because the average 
entrance age is little beyond the seventeenth birthday. During the 
war period the College has given instruction and accommodation 
to as many as 575 students at one time, thus emphasizing the broad 
margin whereby its facilities exceed the normal undergraduate 
limitation. 



oSClo 



CORPORATION OF HAVERFORD COLLEGE 

Officers 

Morris E. Leeds, President 4901 Stenton Ave., Germantown, Phila. 

Felix M. Morley, President of the College Haverford, Pa. 

J. Henry Scattergood, Treasurer 1616 Walnut St., Phila. 

John Flagg Gummere, Secretary W. School Lane and Fox Ave., Phila. 



Members of the Standing Nominating 
Committee of the Corporation 



Term Expires 1945 

William Wistar Comfort Haverford, Pa. 

LovETT Dewees Sweetwater Farm, Glen Mills, Pa. 

Theodore B. Hetzel 768 College Avenue, Haverford, Pa. 



Term Expires 1946 

Harris G. Haviland 16th and Race Sts., Phila. 

Archibald Macintosh 3 College Circle, Haverford, Pa. 

Jonathan M. Steere 1318 Girard Trust Bldg., Phila. 



Term Expires 1947 

Stanley R. Yarnall 5337 Knox St., Germantown, Phila. 

Irvin C. Poley 6012 Chew St., Germantown, Phila. 

Arthur J. Phillips 274 S. Felton St., Phila. 



11 



Board of Managers 

Ex-officio as Officers of Corporation 

Morris E. Leeds, President 4901 Stenton Ave., Phila. 

J. Henry Scattergood, Treasurer 1616 Walnut St., Phila. 

John Flagg Gummere, Secretary W. School Lane and Fox Ave., Phila. 

Term Expires 1945 

Charles J. Rhoads Ithan Road, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Edward W. Evans 304 Arch St., Phila. 

William A. Battey Liberty Trust Building, Phila. 

Dr. Frederic C. Sharpless Rosemont, Pa. 

John A. Silver Olney P. O., Phila. 

Alfred Busselle 347 Madison Ave., New York, N. Y. 

tWALTER C. Janney 1529 Walnut St., Phila. 

William B. Bell Rockefeller Plaza, New York, N. Y. 

*Paul Van Reed Miller Girard Trust Bldg., Phila. 

♦Owen B. Rhoads Packard Bldg., Phila. 

Term Expires 1946 

Frederic H. Strawbridge 801 Market St., Phila. 

Jonathan M. Steere 1318 Girard Trust Bldg., Phila. 

L. Hollingsworth Wood 103 Park Ave., New York, N. Y. 

Stanley R. Yarnall 5337 Knox St., Germantown, Phila. 

William Wistar Comfort Haverford, Pa. 

Dr. Henry M. Thomas, Jr 1201 N. Calvert St., Baltimore, Md. 

Alexander C. Wood, Jr 511 Chestnut St., Phila. 

Harold Evans 100 Provident Trust Bldg., Phila. 

♦William Nelson West, HI 1 104 Stock Exchange Bldg., Phila. 

Term Expires 1947 

J. Stogdell Stokes Summerdale, Phila., Pa. 

M. Albert Lindon 4601 Market St., Phila. 

Francis R. Taylor 901 Girard Trust Bldg., Phila. 

Edward Woolman Haverford, Pa. 

Thomas W. Elkinton 121 S. 3rd St., Phila. 

Dr. S. Emlen Stokes Moorestown, N. J. 

Henry Carter Evans 635 Manatawna Ave., Roxboro, Phila. 

William M. Maier Bailey Building, Phila. 

*John Colvin Wright 116 E. Penn St., Bedford, Pa. 

Faculty Representatives on Board of Managers 

Term Expires 1945 Term Expires 1946 

Dean P. Lockwood Frank D. Watson 

Officers 

Chairman of Board Secretary of Board 

Morris E. Leeds William Nelson West, HI 



• Alumni Representative Manager, 
t Deceased, October 11th, 1944. 



12 



Standing Committees of the Board of Managers 
OF THE Corporation of Haverford College 

Executive Committee 
J. Stogdell Stokes, Chairman Thomas W. Elkinton 

Jonathan M. Steere S. Emlen Stokes 

J. Henry Scattergood Paul V. R. Miller 

Frederic C. Sharpless W. Nelson West, 3rd 

Alexander C. Wood 

Committee on Finance and Investments 
Jonathan M. Steere, Chairman Alexander C. Wood 

J. Henry Scattergood M. Albert Linton 

William B. Bell S. Emlen Stokes 

Committee on Audit and Accounts 
William A. Battey, Chairman William M. Maier 

Francis R. Taylor John F. Gummere 

Harold Evans John Colvin Wright 

Committee on College Property and Farm 
Henry C. Evans, Chairman Thomas A. Battey 

Frederic H. Strawbridge Thomas W. Elkinton 

Edward W. Woolman John A. Silver 

Alfred Busselle William M. Maier 

Owen B. Rhoads 

Committee on Honorary Degrees 
William Wistar Comfort, Chairman Francis R. Taylor 
Stanley R. Yarnall Alexander C. Wood 

M. Albert Linton Henry M. Thomas 

Counsel 

MacCoy, Brittain, Evans, and Lewis 
1632 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia 



13 



FACULTY 

Felix M. Morley 

A.B., Haverford College; B.A., Oxford University ; Ph.D., Brookings Institution; LL.D., 
Hamilton College and Univertity of Pennsylvania ; Litt.D., George Washington University 

President 



Arranged in order of appointment to present rank 

William Wistar Comfort 

A.B., Haverford College; A.B., A.M., and Ph.D., Harvard University ; Litt.D., University of 
Pennsylvania; LL.D., University of Maryland, Lake Forest College and Haverford College 

President, Emeritus 

Henry Sherring Pratt 

A.B., University of Michigan; A.M. and Ph.D., University of Leipzig 

David Scull Professor of Biology, Emeritus 

James Addison BABBirrt 

A.B., Yale University ; A.M., Haverford College; M.D., University of Pennsylvania 

Professor of Hygiene and Physical Education, Emeritus 

RuFus Matthew Jones 

A.B. and A.M., Haverford College; A.M. and D.D., Harvard University ; Litt.D., Penn College; 

LL.D., Haverford College, Swarthmore College, Earlham College and Williams College; 

D. Theol., University of Marburg ; D.D., Yale University ; D. Lit. Hum., Colgate University ; 

S.T.D., Colby College, Columbia University ; 

H. Litt.D., Jewish Inst, of Religion 

T. Wistar Brown Professor of Philosophy, Emeritus 

Legh Wilber Reid 

S.B., Virginia Military Institute; A.B., Johns Hopkins University ; 
S.M., Princeton University ; Ph.D., University of Oottingen 

Professor of Mathematics, Emeritus 

Albert Harris Wilson 

S.B. and S.M., Vanderbilt University ; Ph.D., University of Chicago 

Professor of Mathematics, Emeritus 

Henry Volkmar Gummere 

S.B. and A.M., Haverford College; A.M., Harvard University ; Sc.D., Haverford College 
Lecturer in Astronomy, Emeritus 



Frederic Palmer, Jr.* 

A.B., A.M., and Ph.D., Harvard University 

Professor of Physics 

William Edward Lunt 
A.B. and L.H.D., Bowdoin College; A.M. and Ph.D., Harvard University 
Walter D. and Edith M. L. Scull Professor of English Constitutional History 

Leon Hawley Rittenhouse* 

M.E., Stevens Institute of Technology 
Professor of Engineering 

Frank Dekker Watson 

S.B. in Economics and Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 

Professor of Sociology and Social Work 

Dean Putnam Lockwood 

A.B., A.M., and Ph.D., Harvard University 
Professor of Latin 

* Absent on leave 1944-45. 
t Deceased, October 14, 1044. 

14 



Faculty 15 

William Buell Meldrum 

B.A. and M.Sc, McGUl University ; Ph.D., Harvard University 

John Farnum Professor of Chemistry 

Levi Arnold Post 

A.B. and A.M., Haver ford College; A.M., Harvard University ; 
B.A. and M.A., Oxford University 

Professor of Greek 

Emmett Reid Dunn 

A.B. and A.M., Haverford College; Ph.D., Harvard University 

David Scull Professor of Biology 

Edward Douglas Snyder 

A.B., Yale University ; A.M. and Ph.D., Harvard University 

Professor of English 

Frank Whitson Fetter* 

A.B., Swarthmore College; A.M., Harvard University ; A.M. and Ph.D., Princeton University 

Professor of Economics 

John Alexander Kelly 

A.B., Emory and Henry College; A.M. and Ph.D., Columbia University 

Professor of German 

Douglas Van Steere 

S.B., Michigan State College; B.A., Oxford University ; A.M. and Ph.D., Harvard Univenity 

Professor of Philosophy 

Richard Manliffe Sutton 

S.B., Haverford College; Ph.D., California Institute of Technology 

Professor of Physics 

Cletus O. Oakley 

B.S., University of Texas; S.M., Brown University ; Ph.D., University of Illinois 
Professor of Mathematics 

Ralph M. Sargent 

A.B., Carleton College; Ph.D., Yale University 
Professor of English 

Martin Foss 
LL.D., University of Jena 
Visiting Professor of Philosophy and Government 

Alfred J. Swan 
B.A. and M.A., Oxford University 
Associate Professor of Music 

John Goodwin Herndon 

A.B. and M.A., Washington and Lee University ; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 
Associate Professor of Government 

John William Flight 

B.A., Hope College; M.A., Yale University; B.D. and Ph.D., Hartford Theological Seminary 
Associate Professor of Biblical Literature 

Harry William Pfund 

A.B., Haverford College; A.M. and Ph.D., Harvard University 
Associate Professor of German 

* Absent on leave 1944-45. 



16 Haverford College 

Howard Comfort 

A.B., Haverford College; A.M. and Ph.D., Princeton University ; 
F.A.A.R., American Academy in Rome 

Associate Professor of Latin and Greek 

Alexander Jardine Williamson* 

A.B., Haverford College; A.M. and Ph.D., Princeton University 

Associate Professor of Romance Languages 

Roy Earl Randall* 

Ph.B., Brown University 
Associate Professor of Physical Education 

Clayton William Holmes 

B.S., University of New Hampshire; A.M., Haverford College; 
M.E., University of New Hampshire 

Associate Professor of Engineering 
Thomas Edward Drake 

A.B., Stanford University; M.A., University of Michigan; Ph.D., Yale University 
Associate Professor of American History 

Howard Morris Teaf, Jr. 

B.S. in Econ., A.M., and Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 
Associate Professor of Economics 

Carl Barnett Allendoerfer* 

S.B., Haverford College; B.A. and M.A., Oxford University; Ph.D., Princeton University 
Associate Professor of Mattiematics 

Richard Max Bernheimer* 

Ph.D., Univer»ity of Munich 
Associate Professor of Art 

Edmund Stinnes 

Ph.D., Charlottenburg Institute of Technology 

Associate Professor of Government 

Abraham Pepinsky 

B.A. and M.A., University of Minnesota; Ph.D., The State University of Iowa 

Visiting Associate Professor of Psychology and Music 

William Edward Cadbury, Jr. 

S.B. and A.M., Haverford College; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 

Thomas Oswell Jones* 

B.E., Oshkosh Teachers College; Ph.M. and Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 
Associate Professor of Chemistry 

Howard Knickerbocker Henry 

B.S., University of Pennsylvania 
Assistant Professor of Botany 

Theodore Brinton Hetzel* 

S.B., Haverford College; B.S., in M.E., University of Pennsylvania ; 
M.S. and Ph.D., Pennsylvania State College 

Assistant Professor of Engineering 

Alfred Wiluam Haddleton 
Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

* Absent on leave 1944-45. 



Faculty 17 



Louis C. Green* 

A.B., A.M., and Ph.D., Princeton University 
Assistant Professor of Astronomy 



Omar Pancoast, Jr.* 

University; Ph.D., Columl 

lean College of Life Under 

Assistant Professor of Economics and Sociology 



B.S., Johns Hopkins University; Ph.D., Columbia University; C.L.U. 
American College of Life Underwriters 



Maylon H. Hepp 

A.B. and A.M., Oberlin College; Ph.D., Brown University 
Assistant Professor of Philosophy 

Herbert William Taylor 

A.B., Haverford College; M.D., University of Pennsylvania 
Lecturer in Hygiene 

Arlington Evans 

B.P.E., Normal College A.G.U.; M.S., Temple University 

Instructor in Physical Education 

Lindsay A. Lafford* 

Fellow of the Royal College of Organists; Licentiate of the Royal Academy of Music; 

Associate of the Royal College of Music 

Instructor in Music 

Thomas C. Gibb 

A.B., Dickinion College; M.A., Haverford College 
Instructor in English 

John Otto Rantz 

Graduate of the Williamson Free School of Mechanical Trades 
Instructor in Engineering 

Thomas A. Benham 
B.S., Haverford College 
Instructor in Physics 

Francis Cope Evans 

S.B., Haverford College; D.Phil., Oxford University 

Instructor in Biology 

Laurence William Wylie 

B.A., and M.A., University of Indiana; Ph.D., Brown University 

Instructor in French 

Elisa Asensio 
Instructor in Spanish 

Elizabeth W. Comfort 

A.B., Vassar College 

Instructor in French 

Absent on leave 1944-45. 



18 Haverford College 

The Acting Dean, the Registrar and the Bursar are ex-officio members 
of the Faculty 



ASSISTANTS 

Alan S. FitzGerald 

Research Associate 

in 

Physics and Engineering 

Lewis Edward Coffin, '45 
Assistant in Chemistry 

The following Lecturers are full or part-time members of the Faculty in con- 
nection with the Reconstruction and Relief Unit. 

Aldo Caselli 

D.S.E. and C, University of Naples 

Italian 

Hertha Kraus 

Ph.D., University of Frankfurt 

International Relief Administration 

Charles Wachtel 

Ph.D., De Pauw University 

Polish 

Walter S. Obold 

B.S., Franklin & Marshall College; M.S. and Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 
Public Sanitation 

LiLA G. Hainer 

B.S., Columbia University ; A.M., University of Chicago 
Home Economics 



c-£^l^ 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 



Felix M. Morley 

A.B., Haverford College; B.A., Oxford University ; Ph.D., Brookings Institution; LL.D., 
Hamilton College and University of Pennsylvania; Litt.D., George Washington University 

President 
Archibald Macintosh 

A.B., Haverford College; M.A., Columbia University 
Vice President, and Director of Admissions 

Thomas C. Gibb 

A.B., Dickinson College; A.M., Haverford College 
Acting Dean 

William Mintzer Wills 

A.B., A.M., Haverford College 

Registrar 

Aldo Caselli 

D.S.E. and C, University of Naples 

Bursar 

Dean Putnam Lockwood 

A.B., A.M., and Ph.D., Harvard University 

Librarian 

Robert J. Johnston* 
Superintendent 

Herbert William Taylor 

A.B., Haverford College; M.D., University of Pennsylvania 
Physician in Charge 

Louis C. Green 

A.B., A.M., and Ph.D., Princeton University 
Director of the Strawbridge Memorial Observatory 

Thomas Edward Drake 

A.B., Stanford University ; M.A., University of Michigan; Ph.D., Yale University 
Curator of the Quaker Collection 

Brinton H. Stone 

A.B., Johns Hopkins University ; M.A., Columbia University 
Assistant to the President 

Charles Byles 
Steward 

Amy L. Post 

A.B., Earlham College 
Assistant Librarian 

Mabel S. Beard 

R.N., Lankenau Hospital 
Resident Nurse 

Mary L. Scaife 
Administrative Secretary 

19 



*Deceased, December 14, 1944 



STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY 
AND ADMINISTRATION 



The President and Vice-President are ex-ofEcio members of all committees. 
These administrative officers, the two faculty representatives on the Board of 
Managers, the three elected divisional representatives of the Faculty, the Director 
of the Reconstruction and Relief Unit, and Mr. Stone compose the Academic 
Council. Under the chairmanship of the President this body meets semi-monthly 
throughout the year to consider matters of College policy. The elected members 
for 1944-45 are Messrs. Herndon (Social Science) , Dunn (Natural Sciences) and 
Flight (Humanities) . 

Admissions 

Mr. Macintosh, Chairman 

Messrs. H. Comfort, Holmes, Kelly, Sutton 

Curriculum and Honors 

Mr. Pfund, Chairman 

Messrs. Dunn, Lockwood, Stinnes, Watson 

Delinquent Students 

Mr. Cadbury, Chairman 

Messrs. Benham, Oakley, Post, Teaf 

Fellowships and Prizes 

Mr. Flight, Chairman 

Messrs. Drake, Pepinsky, Pfund, Snyder 

Graduate Students 

Mr. Steere, Chairman 

Messrs. Dunn, Lunt, Meldrum, Wylie 

Library 

Mr. Sargent, Chairman 

Messrs. Drake, Evans, Foss, Lockwood, Pepinsky 

Postwar Planning 

Mr. Sargent, Chairman 

Messrs. Teaf, H. Comfort, Macintosh, Watson, Holmes, Evans, Stone 

Pre-Medical Education 

Mr. Meldrum, Chairman 

Messrs. Evans, Henry, Sutton, Taylor 

Publications 

Mr. Morley, Chairman 

Messrs. Sargent, H. Comfort, Teaf, Wills 

Student Affairs 

Mr. Evans, Chairman 

Messrs. Benham, Haddleton, Herndon, Kelly 



20 



GENERAL REGULATIONS 

ADMISSION 

The policy of Haverford College is to admit to the freshman class 
those applicants who, in the opinion of the Committee on Admis- 
sions, are best qualified to profit by the opportunities which the 
College offers and at the same time to contribute to the under- 
graduate life. Due regard is given not only to scholarly attainment 
as shown by examination and by school record but also to char- 
acter, personality, and interest and ability in important extra- 
curricular activities. 

Whenever practicable, the College will arrange for the candidate 
to have a personal interview with a representative of this institution. 
Every applicant should realize that, in view of the limited enroll- 
ment, he is entering a competition for admission to a carefully 
selected and comparatively small student organization. On the basis 
of all information available — College Board reports, school record, 
class standing, evidence touching on character and personality — 
the application will be accepted or rejected, and the decision of the 
Committee on Admissions is final. Preference will be given to those 
with superior records and credentials rather than to those with 
mere priority of application. 

Students who are accepted will be admitted without conditions. 
To those who on entrance show marked proficiency in certain sub- 
jects, as a result of special tests provided, advanced standing in 
those subjects will be granted. 

Each applicant for admission must take the Scholastic Aptitude 
Test given by the College Entrance Examination Board, and usually 
some achievement tests given by the same Board. Applications 
involving divergence from the normal procedure must be discussed 
in detail with the Director of Admissions. In addition the applicant 
must present, on blanks furnished by the College, his school record 
and a certificate of character signed by his school principal. The 
school certificate must show satisfactory attainment in 15 units* 
of work. 

The preparatory course must include four years of English, at 
least a year and a half of Algebra and one year of Geometry, and 
three years of one foreign language and two years of another; or, 

* A unit represents a year's study in any subject in a secondary school, constituting approxi- 
mately a quarter of a full year's work. A four years' secondary school curriculum should be 
regarded as representing not more than 16 units of work. 

21 



22 Haverford College 

if four units of Latin are offered, two units of a second language 
are required. Cases involving divergence from the requirement 
should be discussed with the Director of Admissions. The remaining 
units will be drawn from laboratory science, history, and additional 
mathematics and language. 

A candidate may offer an elective in a subject not in the usual 
list, if this choice is approved by the Admissions Committee, and 
if he shows proficiency that indicates an amount of study and intel- 
lectual effort commensurate with that required in other subjects. 

Information Concerning College Entrance Board Tests 

In addition to the Scholastic Aptitude Test of the College Entrance 
Board, which is required of all candidates for admission, each can- 
didate shall take, after consultation with the Admissions Office, three 
of the Achievement Tests offered by the Board. 

A single Bulletin of Information containing rules for the filing of 
applications and the payment of fees, lists of examination centers, 
etc., may be obtained without charge from the College Entrance 
Examination Board. The Board does not publish a detailed descrip- 
tion of the Scholastic Aptitude Test or the Achievement Tests. 
A practice form of the former test will be sent to every candidate 
who registers for it. 

Candidates should make application by mail to the College 
Entrance Examination Board, P.O. Box 592, Princeton, New Jersey. 
Blank forms for this purpose will be sent to any teacher or candidate 
upon request. When ordering the forms, candidates should state 
whether they wish to take the December, April, June, or September 
tests. 

In order to facilitate the arrangements for the conduct of the tests, 
all applications should be filed as early as possible. Each applica- 
tion should be accompanied by the appropriate examination fee, 
which is four dollars for candidates who take only the Scholastic 
Aptitude Test and eight dollars for all other candidates. Applica- 
tions and fees should reach the office of the Board by November 11, 
1944, for the December, 1944 tests; March 17, 1945, for the April 
tests; May 12, 1945, for the June tests, and August 15, 1945, for the 
September tests. 

When a candidate has failed to obtain the required blank form of 
application, the regular fee will be accepted if it arrives not later 
than the specified date and is accompanied by the candidate's name 
and address, the exact examination center selected, the college to 
which his report is to be sent, and the test or tests he is to take. 



HAVERFORD COLLEGE 

APPLICATION BLANK 

To THE Director of Admissions, Haverford College, 
Haverford, Pennsylvania 

Under the conditions set forth on page 21 of the Haverford College Catalog for 
1944-45, I hereby make application for the entry of (write name in full) : 



First name Middle name Last name 
as a student in Haverford College during the year 19 

Date of birth 

Religious affiliation 

School last attended 

Date of graduation 

Course which he desires to enter (mark one) : 

Arts 

Science 

Engineering 

Candidate is an applicant for a scholarship 

Resident or Day Student 

Room preference (expense and location) 



Name of parent or guardian 



Number Street 



City State 

.19 



Date 



General Regulars 23 

The Board will report the results of the tests to the institution 
indicated on the candidate's application. The colleges will, in turn, 
notify the candidates of the action taken upon their applications 
for admission. Candidates will not receive reports upon their tests 
from the Board. 

Admission of Veterans 

The College welcomes the return of men whose education has been 
interrupted by military, naval, or non-combatant service. Veterans 
will be admitted on the standards of accomplishment set for regular 
Haverford students. Academic credit for strictly military courses or 
for work in CPS camps and applications for admission without 
the usual examinations will be considered on an individual basis. 
Flexibility will be maintained in regard to the time of admission of 
veterans, particularly in the fall and spring terms. Candidates who 
are interested should apply to the admissions office for details. 

Advanced Standing 
Since Haverford offers an integrated education, admission with 
advanced standing is ordinarily granted only in a limited number 
of cases. An undergraduate who comes from an approved college 
must submit an official statement of his honorable dismissal, together 
with a full list of his accepted preparatory subjects, and a list of all 
his college courses with his record therein. 

COURSES OF STUDY 

Haverford College recognizes each matriculate as an individual 
whose training in the past and whose plans for the future may differ- 
entiate him from his fellows. The College accordingly lays out 
tentatively an individual plan of study for each student at the begin- 
ning of his Freshman year. This plan is confirmed or modified for 
each succeeding year. 

In making each plan, the College directs Faculty members to see 
to it that the student takes in his Freshman and Sophomore years 
certain courses which are required in his case and that he distributes 
his limited electives so as to make the plan both broad and sound. 

Twenty academic courses plus three Physical Education courses 

are required for graduation. The academic courses may be classified 

as follows: 

Required 1 

Limited Electives 5 or 6 

(Foreign Language 1 or 2, others 4) 

Major Concentration (average) 6 

Free Electives 7 or 8 

Total 20 



24 Haverford College 

For those who undertake an accelerated program the equivalent 
of thirty-six courses of one term each are required. The number 
of required courses, limited electives, and average major concentra- 
tion courses are the same as for those who do not accelerate. 

Required Courses 
Two one-term courses in English, and Physical Education 1, are 
required of all Freshmen. Physical Education 2 and Physical Educa- 
tion 3 are required of all Sophomores and Juniors, respectively. 

Limited Electives 
It is the conviction of Haverford College that the study of Greek 
and Latin offers both general and specific values which ought not to 
be lightly omitted from the education of its students; in view of this 
conviction the College may advise and, where it deems necessary, is 
prepared to require the study of these subjects. 

1. Each student who is a candidate for the Bachelor's degree 
should present at entrance three units of one foreign language and 
two of another. After entrance he must pass either one course in a 
language which he has presented for entrance or two courses in a 
third foreign language. 

2. Each student must pass a course of two terms or two courses of 
one term each in Literature, either English or foreign, from the fol- 
lowing list: English Sb, Ha, I2b, lib, 21a, 216, 22b, 23a, 26b, 27a, 
306, 326, 41a, 426, and 43a; French 166, 17a, 186, 19a; German 5a, 
66, Ha, 126, 13a, 146, 15a, 17a, and 186; Greek 2, 3a, 46, 7a, 86, 9a, 
106, and 27a; Latin 5a, 66, 7, 9a, 106^ 11; Spanish 4a, 46, 5a, 66, and 7. 
Any course in Art or Music may be substituted for a literature course, 
with the permission of the departments concerned. 

3. Each student should present one course involving laboratory 
work in Biology, Chemistry, or Physics, or must take one after 
entrance. 

4. Each student must pass a course of two terms or two courses of 
one term each chosen from Biblical Literature la, 26, 46, 5a, 66, 86; 
Philosophy 3a, 5, 7a, 9a, 106, 17a, 186, or Sociology la, 26, 46. 

5. Each student must pass a course of two terms or two courses of 
one term each in Economics, Government, or History. 

Major Concentration 

A student may elect to major in any one of the following depart- 
ments: Art, Astronomy, Biblical Literature, Biology, Chemistry, 
Economics, Engineering, English, French, German, Government, 
Greek, History, Latin, Mathematics, Music, Philosophy, Physics, 
Sociology, Spanish. 



General Regulations 25 

Definite requirements of each department are stated under the 
name of the department on pages 55-89 and are understood as apply- 
ing to the class of 1948. During the fourth term of his attendance 
each student should confer with the Major Supervisor of the depart- 
ment in which he wishes to major, and must apply to him for writ- 
ten approval of a program of courses for the last four terms. Such a 
program must provide for the completion by the end of the Senior 
year of no fewer than six courses, at least three of which must have 
been in the major department and the others in closely related fields. 
Courses taken before the Junior year are included or not, at the dis- 
cretion of the Major Supervisor. Should the student's application be 
rejected by the department of his first choice, he must immediately 
apply in another. Failure to file with the Dean, before the date speci- 
fied on the College Calendar, a copy of his Major program, signed 
by his Major Supervisor, will entail a fine of $5. Any student who 
continues delinquent in this matter will be debarred from the final 
examinations in his fourth term. Should the student's application 
be rejected by all the departments to which he applies, he will not 
be promoted. 

A student who applies for permission to become a Major in any 
Department may be rejected for scholastic reasons only. The College 
rule on this point is: 

If, at the time specified for application, the average of the grades 
obtained by a student in the preliminary courses and "major require- 
ments" of any department is 75 or above, the student will be accepted 
by that department. 

If the average of the grades obtained in these courses is below 70, 
the student will be accepted in that department only under excep- 
tional circumstances. 

If the average of the grades obtained in these courses is 70 or above, 
but below 75, the decision will be at the discretion of the Major 
Supervisor. 

The phrase "preliminary courses," above, is understood to mean 
any courses the student may already have taken in the department 
for which he is applying. If the applicant has not already taken any 
courses in that department, the department should name courses in 
other departments which might be regarded as "preliminary." 

On a student's approved major registration form shall be listed 
only those major courses and closely related courses which constitute 
his major program. The student chooses his own free elective courses 
for his last four terms, after consultation with his Major Supervisor, 



26 Haverford College 

"whose power outside the field of major concentration is, however, 
merely advisory." (Catalog, 1937, page 36.) 

Each student shall consult with his Major Supervisor within the 
first two weeks of each term during his last four terms for the pur- 
pose of reviewing his program of courses. Due notice of this responsi- 
bility is to be given by the Dean to the students and to the Major 
Supervisors. 

Each Senior must take a special Major examination (written, oral, 
or both) during the week preceding the final examination period. 
The passing grade for this examination is 70. In case of failure a can- 
didate may, with the permission of his Major department, present 
himself for re-examination at a date (to be determined by the Major 
Supervisor) later than Commencement Day of the current year. 

If the re-examination be taken one year later, during the regular 
period of major examinations, there is no fee. But if the candidate 
applies for re-examination at an earlier date (involving the prepara- 
tion of a special examination for one individual) and if the request 
is granted, the fee is $25.00. 

A student who has been formally accepted as a Major by any 
department has the right to remain as a Major in that department as 
long as he is in College. Should he wish to change from one depart- 
ment to another after the beginning of his fifth term, the change 
can be made only by the consent of the two Major Supervisors con- 
cerned and the Dean. 

In order to allow time for preparation for the Major examination, 
any Senior may omit, with the consent of his Major Supervisor, one 
non-Major half-year course in the second half-year. 

Examination in the Major subject in courses taken in the Senior 
year may be omitted at the discretion of the Major Supervisor. 

Free Electives 

A number of courses sufficient to bring the total to twenty aca- 
demic courses shall be chosen by the student, with the understanding 
that for the Freshman and Sophomore years the College reserves the 
right through the Dean to prevent unreasonable combinations of 
courses but that in the Junior and Senior years the student will 
choose his free electives after consultation with his Major Supervisor. 

Programs 

Freshman Program 

Although the Dean is instructed to lay out for each Freshman a 
plan of study suited to his special needs, the Faculty requires that 



General Regulations 27 

English be taken throughout the year, and recommends in all usual 
cases that Freshmen take one or two foreign languages and two or 
three courses chosen from History, Mathematics, and Science, not 
more than one in any one of those fields. 

The courses open to Freshmen, in addition to the required work 
in English and Physical Education, are: 

Art 1 Government 3a, 4b 

Biblical Literature la. 2b Greek 1, 2, 3 

Biology 1 or 2a History 1 

Chemistry 1 or 2 Latin 1, 3, 5a, 6b, 7 

Engineering la, 2b, lOfe Mathematics 1 

French 1, 2 or 3 Physics 1 

German 1, 2 or 3 Spanish 1 or 3 

In special cases. Freshmen may be admitted to certain other courses 
with the consent of the Dean. 

In cooperation with the Department of English the Dean admin- 
isters a series of standard tests to all entrants within the first few days 
of each term. The results of these tests are used to help Freshmen to 
readjust, if necessary, their selection of courses. These tests are also 
used as the basis of a recommendation to some Freshmen to elect the 
course in remedial reading using the Harvard Reading Films. This 
course is offered each term to students who feel the need of estab- 
lishing reading habits that will improve their comprehension and 
increase their speed when studying reading assignments. 

A Freshman will not be permitted to take more than five courses, 
in addition to Physical Education, except with special consent of the 
Faculty. As to requisite grades, see page 38. 

Sophomore, Junior, and Senior Programs 

A Sophomore, Junior, or Senior must take five courses, besides 
Physical Education, and may not take more than five, unless he 
receives the special permission of the Dean or is required to repeat 
or substitute a course, in which case he must also obtain the con- 
sent of the Dean. For promotion and graduation grades, see page 38. 
Unless otherwise specified, all courses offered in any term are open 
to Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors. 

A member of the three upper classes is expected to assume full 
responsibility for his academic program term by term, but the help 
of the Faculty and of the Administration is freely available in regard 
to immediate and general progiams. During the war all students in 
College are required to file in the current term a tentative program 
for the next term, so that plans can be made for offering courses. 



28 Haverford College 

Special Cases 

Whenever a student gives proof of special aims and abilities, the 
College is prepared to lay aside such requirements of the preceding 
plan as stand between him and the accomplishment of his ambitions. 
An undergraduate who is not required to take extra work because 
of a deficiency or delinquency may be able to take extra courses at 
a charge of $25.00 for each extra semester course, by applying to the 
Dean. No refund will be made to a student who drops a sixth course 
after the first two weeks of a semester. 

Conflicting Courses 

A student is not allowed to elect conflicting courses, except with 
the permission of the Dean and the two instructors concerned. 
In case of conflict involving a repeated course the repeated course 
takes precedence. 

Intercollegiate Courtesy 

Because of the cooperative relationship now existing between 
Bryn Mawr College, Haverford College, Swarthmore College, and 
the University of Pennsylvania, full-time students of one of these 
four institutions may, upon presentation of the proper credentials, 
enroll for courses in another institution of the group. This institu- 
tional courtesy does not involve the payment of additional fees 
except in the case of laboratory courses, in which case the visiting 
student will be charged the same laboratory fees or deposits as 
students in the institution to which he goes. 

Students desiring to take advantage of this arrangement should 
secure the permission of the Dean, and also the permission of the 
chairman of the Department at the College under which the course 
involved would most naturally fall. It is also desirable that the 
instructor giving the course be consulted in advance. 

Graduate students will obtain similar permission from the Com- 
mittee on Graduate Students. Ordinarily, the holder of a graduate 
fellowship will not be permitted to take more than one course in 
another institution for credit on his Haverford record. 

The Presidents of Bryn Mawr, Swarthmore, and Haverford con- 
sult at regular intervals to further cooperative arrangements between 
their respective institiuions. 



General Regulations 29 

DEGREES 

Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science 

Students who have received credit for the full number of courses 
in prescribed and elective studies, provided they have for the 
Junior and Senior years, respectively, a general average, for the 
year, of 70 or above, and provided they have passed their Major 
examinations with a grade of 70 or above, are granted the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science. The normal degree con- 
ferred upon all candidates meeting these requirements is that of 
Bachelor of Arts. However, upon request by the candidate, and 
approval by the department concerned, the Bachelor of Science 
degree will be granted to men majoring in Natural Science, Mathe- 
matics, or Engineering. The fee for the Bachelor's degree is $15. 

Master of Arts and Master of Science 

Admission to Candidacy. — Graduates of Haverford College or an 
institution of equivalent standing, who present satisfactory evidence 
of character, seriousness of purpose, and scholarly attainments, may 
be admitted as candidates for the degree of Master of Arts or Master 
of Science. A candidate should have a reading knowledge of one 
foreign language, ancient or modern. 

Requirements. — A candidate who is well prepared for advanced 
study in his special field is required to pass four advanced courses 
(each with a grade of not less than 80) and to do satisfactory addi- 
tional intensive work, equivalent at least to a full course, which may 
take the form of a thesis or other research. (In a full year course in 
which credit is not granted for the work of a single term, the course 
grade is the average of the two term grades; in other cases each term's 
work is a separate course, for the purposes of this requirement.) 
At least two of the courses and the additional intensive work must 
be in the same field and the remaining courses in allied subjects. 
In addition, the candidate may, at the discretion of the professor in 
charge, be required to pass a comprehensive examination upon the 
field of his major subject. The scope of the examination will be 
determined by the professor in charge, and will be communicated to 
the candidate when he is admitted as a graduate student. The entire 
plan of study must be drawn up by the candidate in consultation 
with the professor under whom he proposes to do the major part of 
his work. This plan must be submitted for approval before October 1 



30 Haverford College 

to the Chairman of the Committee on Graduate Students. After 
approval by this Committee, the program must be filed with the 
Registrar. Before award of the Master's degree the candidate must 
deposit two copies of his thesis in the College library. 

A minimum of one year's residence is required, and a candidate, 
if well prepared, should be able to complete his work for the degree 
in this time. If his preparation is inadequate a longer period of 
residence may be necessary, but candidates for the Master's degree 
must complete the required work in not more than two academic 
years. Courses taken before the registration of the candidate as a 
graduate student at Haverford College will not usually be counted 
toward the degree. 

Candidates who engage in any occupation or employment other 
than graduate study will not in general be able to satisfy the require- 
ments for the degree in one year. 

Charges. — The charges for a Graduate Student are: tuition, 
board, |300; lodging, $175. The fee for the Master's degree is 
Laboratory fees, supplies, breakage, and incidentals are extra. 

Fellowships. — Six graduate fellowships of |800 each are available 
each year primarily for members of the Society of Friends and for 
the graduates of other Friends' Colleges in the United States, who 
wish to proceed with their education in any department of Haverford 
College which may be selected, provided the candidate and his pro- 
posed schedules of study are approved by the Committee on Grad- 
uate Students. Any recipient of a graduate fellowship should have 
additional resources of at least $300. The board and lodging must 
be at Haverford College unless by arrangement with the Dean they 
are taken at the neighboring Quaker community of Pendle Hill. 

Applications should be accompanied by a certified list of the 
applicant's courses and grades as an undergraduate, a statement of 
his draft status, three letters concerning the character, personality, 
financial condition and qualifications of the applicant, a copy of the 
catalog of the institution in which the applicant was an under- 
graduate, and a small photograph. Applications and material should 
be in the hands of the Dean of Haverford College before March 1st 
to secure consideration for the following year. 



General Regulations 31 

GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS FOR STUDY 
IN RECONSTRUCTION AND RELIEF 

By act of the Faculty of Haverford College on March 18 and by 
the Board of Managers on March 19, 1943, the Reconstruction and 
Relief Course was declared a possible field for specialization for the 
Master of Arts or the Master of Science degree at Haverford College: 
the Master of Arts and the Master of Science degrees were also open 
to women; and the six Thomas Wistar Brown graduate fellowships 
of $800 each were declared open to men and women candidates 
intending to specialize in the field of Reconstruction and Relief, 
provided that the other conditions of this trust were fulfilled. 

Only those candidates approved by the Faculty Graduate Students 
Committee as suitable for graduate study will be permitted to receive 
credit toward a graduate degree while taking these training courses 
in the Reconstruction and Relief Unit. Further, it is to be noted 
that graduate credit is only to be allowed in those courses which are 
declared open to graduate study. In the case of the Reconstruction 
and Relief courses, all courses in the existing Specialization cur- 
riculum, with the exception of the elementary language courses, 
however, are open to graduate study. The usual requirement of a 
minimum grade of 80 in each course for graduate students will be 
maintained. 

For well-prepared candidates from colleges of high standing, it 
would be possible to complete the course work for the Master of Arts 
or Master of Science degree in the twelve months of resident aca- 
demic study designated in the graduate course of the Reconstruction 
and Relief training. The Master of Arts thesis would alone remain 
to be completed outside of this time. Arrangements have been made 
for an extension of time for completing theses for those actively 
engaged in Relief and Reconstruction service abroad. 

HONORS 

Honors are awarded for excellence in the studies of single depart- 
ments. They are never given merely for performance of routine work 
in courses, but a considerable amount of extra work is demanded 
in every case. 

Honors are of three kinds: Hmrorable Mention, Preliminary 
Honors, and Final Honors. 



32 Haverford College 

Honorable Mentionf will be awarded at the end of the Freshman 
or Sophomore years for work in a single course meeting at least two 
hours per week throughout the year, and additional work to the 
total amount of not less than 60 hours. Candidates for Honorable 
Mention must obtain a minimum grade of 85 in the regular work 
of the course and pass creditably an examination on the additional 
work required. Two courses of one term each in the same depart- 
ment may be construed as a single course. 

A Freshman who has received the prescribed grade in the regular 
work of a course required for Honorable Mention, but who has not 
done the additional work required in connection with such course, 
may, with the consent of the professor in charge, do so during the 
Sophomore year. 

Preliminary Honors will be awarded at the end of the Sophomore 
or Junior year for work in not less than two courses of two terms 
each in a single department, and additional work to the total amount 
of not less than 120 hours. Candidates for Preliminary Honors must 
obtain a minimum average grade of 85 in the courses required for 
such honors and a grade satisfactory to the Department in such of 
these courses as are taken in the Sophomore or Junior year, and must 
pass creditably examinations on the additional work required. 

Final Honors are graded as Honors, High Honors, or Highest 
Honors. They will be awarded upon graduation only to students 
whose work in a major field of concentration has been done with 
marked distinction and has been more profound or more extensive 
in its scope than the minimum required. The award of Honors is 
at the discretion of the major department, but the award of High or 
Highest Honors is to be made by vote of the Faculty upon recom- 
mendation of a department or group of related departments. In order 
to receive High or Highest Honors, the student will usually be given 
a public oral examination, and for Highest Honors, the verdict of 
an outside examiner may be obtained if deemed desirable. The vari- 
ous departments and divisions will adopt such specifications for 
Final Honors as they see fit. 

At the time of the award of Honors there shall be added to the 
general average for the year of each student receiving Honors, one- 

t Honorable mention is awarded in Freshman English in connection with the work of the 
second term (English 26). 



General Regulations 35 

half of one per cent for each award of Honorable Mention or Pre- 
liminary Honors. Honors, High Honors, and Highest Honors shall 
automatically add one, two, and three per cent, respectively, to the 
average for the Senior year of each student receiving such award. 

PRIZES 

All material submitted in competition for prizes should be depos- 
ited with the Registrar under assumed names, with a sealed envelope 
containing the writer's real name, before May 1. 

All prizes awarded in books are marked with appropriate book- 
plates. As soon as possible after the award a list of standard books, 
from which selection is to be made, should be submitted for approval 
to the head of the department awarding the prize. Books selected 
from the approved list may then be ordered through the College 
Office or elsewhere. The College grants an average discount of 
ten per cent on prize books, and supplies the bookplates. 

Alumni Prize for Composition and Oratory 

The Alumni Association, in the year 1875, established an annual 
prize of |50 in money for excellence in composition and oratory. 

John B. Garrett Prizes for Systematic Reading 
IN Literature 

A first prize of |50 and a second prize of |25 will be given at the 
end of the Junior or Senior year to the two students who, besides 
creditably pursuing their regular course of study, shall have carried 
on the most profitable program of reading in a period or compre- 
hensive topic in the field of literature (ancient, American or foreign) 
during at least two years of their college career. 

The administration of these prizes is in the hands of the Commit- 
tee on Fellowships and Prizes, with which the candidate shall register 
and which shall approve the subject chosen. The Committee will 
then recommend the candidate to the Department or Departments 
to which he should apply for counsel and guidance. An oral exam- 
ination will be arranged in the final year to determine the scope 
and quality of the reading. 



34 Haverford College 

The winners will be determined by the Committee after consulta- 
Ijion with the Departments concerned. Either or both of these prizes 
may be omitted if, in the judgment of the Committee, the work does 
not justify an award. 

The Class of 1896 Prizes in Latin and Mathematics 

These are two prizes worth $10 each. They will be awarded in 
books at the end of the Sophomore year to the students who have 
done the best work for the two years in Latin and Mathematics, 
respectively. 

The Lyman Beecher Hall Prize in Chemistry 

J The Class of 1898 on the twenty-fifth anniversary of their gradua- 
tjion established a prize in honor of Lyman Beecher Hall, Professor 
oi Chemistry at Haverford College from 1880 to 1917. 

This prize amounts to $100 and may be awarded to a student who 
has attained a high degree of proficiency in chemistry and who shows 
promise of contributing substantially to the advancement of the 
science. This prize may be awarded to a Junior, to a Senior, or to 
a graduate of Haverford College within three years after gradua- 
tion. It may be awarded more than once to the same student, or 
may be withheld. 

The Class of 1902 Prize in Latin 

The Class of 1902 offers a prize of $10 in books to the Freshman 
whose work in Latin, in recitation and examinations combined, shall 
be the most satisfactory to the professor in charge of the department. 

J The Department Prizes in Mathematics 

A first prize of $15 and a second prize of $10 are awarded on the 
t^asis of a three hour examination on selected topics in Freshman 
Mathematics. The examination is held on the first Monday after 
the Spring Recess, and is open to Freshmen only. 

The Elliston P. Morris Prize 

A prize of $40, open to all undergraduates and to graduates of 
hot more than three years' standing, is offered every year for the 
best essay bearing on the general problem of "International Peace 
and the Means of Securing It." No prize will be awarded unless a 
high standard of merit is attained. Essays should be deposited with 



General Regulations 35 

the Registrar before May 1. The judges shall be appointed by the 
President of the College. For the 1944-45 competition the following 
subjects are offered: 

1. A Critical Evaluation of Leading Proposals for Post-War 
Reconstruction. 

2. Appraisal of Prominent Plans for International Organization 
Following the Present War. 

3. The Problem of Sovereignty versus World-Government. 

4. America's Part in Post-War Organization. 

The presentation should be not merely a catalog of events but also 
an interpretation and estimate of them. Each essay should contain 
references, in the form of footnotes and bibliography, to the authori- 
ties consulted. 

Essays submitted by undergraduates for this prize may also be sub- 
mitted for the Elizabeth P. Smith Prize, but the two prizes will not 
be awarded to one person. 

The Elizabeth P. Smith Prize 

A prize of |40 is offered annually to the undergraduate who pre- 
sents the best essay on international peace under the same conditions 
and terms as the Elliston P. Morris Prize. Essays for this prize should 
be deposited with the Registrar before May 1. The judges shall be 
appointed by the President of the College. 

Prizes in Philosophy and Biblical Literature 
A prize of |40 in books is offered each year to the student who, in 
the judgment of the professor in charge, does the most satisfactory 
amount of outside reading in philosophy in connection with the 
courses in that department. A second prize of $25 in books is also 
offered. 

A prize of $40 in books is offered each year to the student who, in 
the judgment of the professor in charge, does the most satisfactory 
amount of reading on the Bible and related subjects. A second prize 
of $25 in books is also offered. 

These prizes may be competed for during any year of the College 
course. 

The Scholarship Improvement Prizes 

A first prize of $50 and a second prize of $45 will be given at the 
end of the Senior year to the two students who, in the opinion of 



36 Haverford College 

the judges appointed by the President of the College, show the 
most steady and marked improvement in scholarship during their 
college course. 

The Class of 1910 Poetry Prizes 

Two prizes of $15 and $10, respectively, are awarded for the 
best verse written by a Haverford undergraduate during the year. 
Typewritten manuscript, under an assumed name, should be de- 
posited with the Registrar not later than May 1. The judges shall 
be appointed by the President of the College. 

The Logan Pearsall Smith Prize 

An annual award of $50 in books will be made to that member of 
the Senior Class who, in the opinion of the Committee on Prizes, has 
the best personal library. Consideration of the books collected will 
be entirely independent of their cost. 

Candidates must register with the Committee on Fellowships and 
Prizes before March 1. The contest closes May 1. By that date every 
candidate shall have deposited with the Registrar a list of books 
and a brief essay explaining the purpose of his collection. 

The Founders Club Prize 

A prize of $25 is offered by the Founders Club to the Freshman 
who is judged to have shown the best attitude toward college activi- 
ties and scholastic work. 

The S. p. Lippincott Prize in History 

A prize of $100 is offered for competition in the Departinent of 
History under the following general provisions: 

First — The prize may be withheld in any year, if the conditions 
listed below are not met by any of the competitors to the satisfaction 
of a majority of the judges. 

Second — The prize shall not be awarded twice to the same student. 

Third — Competition is open to Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors 
who have taken or are taking work in the Department of History. 

Conditions 

In competition for this prize an essay shall be submitted of not less 
than 5,000 words, offered as evidence of scholarly ability in the col- 
lection and presentation of historical material, treating a subject 



General Regulations 37 

selected from a list announced by the Department of History before 
November 15. The essay should contain references in footnotes to 
the authorities consulted and a bibliography of works cited. 

The essay shall be typewritten and deposited under an assumed 
name with the Registrar before May 1. 

For the competition of 1944-45 the following subjects are sub- 
mitted: 

1. Diplomatic Relations Between Great Britain and France from 
1880 to 1906. 

2. The Development of the Free City of Danzig from 1919 to 1938. 

3. Franco- American Relations, 1776 to 1815. 

4. The Growth of the American Navy, 1865 to 1940. 

The Newton Prize in English Literature 

The Newton Prize in English Literature ($50) may be awarded 
annually on the basis of Final Honors in English, provided that 
the Department judges that the work of the leading candidate merits 
such award. 

The William Ellis Scull Prize 

The William Ellis Scull Prize ($50) will be awarded annually to 
the upper classman who shall have shown the "greatest achievement 
in voice and the articulation of the English language." 

The George Peirce Prize in Chemistry or Mathematics 

In memory of Dr. George Peirce, 1903, a prize of $50 is offered 
annually to a student of Chemistry or Mathematics "who has shown 
marked proficiency in either or both of these studies and who intends 
to follow a profession which calls for such preparation. Preference 
is to be given to a student who has elected organic chemistry, and 
failing such a student, to one who has elected Mathematics or some 
branch of Chemistry other than organic. Should there be two stu- 
dents of equal promise, the one who is proficient in Greek shall be 
given preference." The prize is offered, however, exclusively for 
students who expect to engage in research, and it will not be awarded 
unless the candidate has this expressed intention. 



38 Haverford College 

The National Foundation for Education in 
American Citizenship Prize 

A cash prize of $100 for the best essay, by a Haverford under- 
graduate, on the subject of "The Basic Principles Underlying the 
Government of the United States" is offered by this Foundation. 
The essay shall be typewritten, should not exceed five thousand 
words, and must be deposited under an assumed name with the 
Registrar before May I. Accelerating Seniors are eligible for this 
competition and may submit their essays within one year after 
leaving College. 

GRADING OF STUDENTS 

In determining the standing of the student, daily recitations, hour 
examinations, and final examinations are all considered. Reports, 
with numerical grades and averages, are issued at the end of each 
term. 

Freshmen are expected to obtain a general average for the year of 
at least 60 for promotion to the Sophomore class; Sophomores are 
required to obtain a general average for the year of at least 65 for 
promotion to the Junior class; Juniors, 70 for promotion to the Senior 
class; and Seniors, 70 for graduation. 

DELINQUENT STUDENTS 

A student who achieves a grade of 50-60 (E) as his term mark in 
any course is allowed a special examination in September following 
the failure (on Monday, Tuesday, or Wednesday immediately pre- 
ceding the opening of College) . Seniors who achieve 50-60 in any 
course (except in the Major Examination, see page 25) are permitted 
to take the special examination during Commencement Week. These 
examinations, known as make-up examinations, are scheduled only 
upon written request by the student and on the payment of the fee 
of $5.00 for each examination. The request and the fee must be 
received by the Registrar ten days before the opening of College in 
September. Late applicants are subject to an additional fee of $5.00. 
During the war special examinations for those with a grade of 50-60 
may be arranged through the Dean and scheduled soon after the 
condition is registered. A student who achieves a grade below 50 is 
not permitted to take a special examination in that course. 

A student with 50 or below as his term grade, or with 50-60 as his 
term grade in any course after the special examination privilege has 
lapsed or after taking a special examination must repeat the course 



General Regulations 39 

if it is a required course (repeated courses take precedence in the 
case of conflict, and are recorded and averaged in the year of repeti- 
tion) , or may substitute some other course if the failure is an elective 
course. No course may be repeated more than once; failure to pass 
a repeated required course will consequently prevent a student from 
obtaining this degree. 

A fee of $15 per term is charged for all repeated or substituted 
courses. 

No student, after his freshman year, shall be permitted to drop a 
course after the second week of a term, except upon the recommenda- 
tion of the Dean and with the approval of the instructor in charge. 
A course, once reported to the College office, shall not be removed 
from the student's record. In the case of failure this shall apply, even 
though the credit deficiency has been made up by taking an extra 
course in a subsequent semester, or applying a credit previously 
obtained. If a student fails a course and wishes to make up the credit 
deficiency by taking an extra course in the subsequent term, he shall 
be granted permission only if he first forfeits all right to re-examina- 
tion in his failed course. 

A Sophomore who fails to attain promotion average (see page 38) ;, 
and who has not more than two failures, may have the privilege of 
taking re-examinations in the two half-courses in which he has 
received the lowest grades, provided that these grades be better 
than F. A Senior or Junior who fails to attain promotion average 
(see page 38) , and who has not more than one failure, may take a 
re-examination in the course of one term in which he has received 
the lowest grade, provided that this grade be better than F. 

Any student whose record is such as to justify the belief that he is 
not availing himself of the opportunities offered by Haverford Col- 
lege may be dropped. Usually a student who has failures against 
him in more than two one-term courses at the opening of College 
in September will be dropped. In such cases no refund will be 
made (see page 41) . ; 



FINANCIAL ARRANGEMENTS 

ROOMS 

Entering Freshmen are assigned rooms in the order in which their 
application blanks for admission (see page 21) are received. It is, of 
course, not always possible to meet the desire of Freshmen for the 
cheapest rooms. Twelve of the $100 rooms are regularly reserved for 
Freshmen. The College assumes that a new student will accept any 
available room of approximately the same price as the room for 
which a preference is expressed. The choice of rooms by other stu- 
dents is governed by published rules. 

A deposit of |15 is required of all students, old and new, before 
a room is reserved. In case the student occupies the room, the amount 
will be deducted from his bill for the following year; otherwise it will 
be forfeited, unless the student be excluded by the College for fail- 
ures or other sufficient reason, in which case the fee will be refunded. 

Students are expected to treat their own and College property with 
the same consideration as in their own homes. A student is held 
financially responsible for any damage to his room, and any damage 
wilfully done will be sufficient reason for requesting withdrawal 
from the College. 

The College does not hold itself responsible for the safekeeping 
of private property left by the students in their rooms, or elsewhere 
on the campus. 

EXPENSES 

The combined charge for tuition ($450) , board ($300) , and room 
rent ($100 to $225, according to location) , varies from $850 to $975 
for the fall and spring terms. The charge for the summer session is 
$45 for each term course, $10 a week for board, and $40 to $55 for 
room rent. These charges, which are subject to alteration by the 
Board of Managers if circumstances render such action desirable, 
include heat, electric light, attendance, and the use of necessary bed- 
room furniture, i.e., a bureau and a bed, the linen for which is fur- 
nished and laundered by the College. Students will supply their own 
study furniture, blankets and towels. In general, two students share 
one study and each has his private bedroom adjoining. A few single 
rooms are also available. 

40 



Financial Arrangements 41 

Because of the occupancy of Barclay Hall by the U. S. Government 
units resident at Haverford College, it is not at present available as 
a dormitory. 

The charge for tuition of day-students is $450 for the fall and 
spring terms and |45 for each term course for the summer. A labora- 
tory fee (as specified elsewhere in this catalog) and the cost of mate- 
rials consumed and of apparatus broken are charged in each of the 
laboratories. The fee for dropping a course after two weeks is .1^15. 
The fee for the Bachelor's degree is $15. For Graduate Student fees, 
see page 30. 

The College requires that bills rendered October 1 for three-fiEths 
of the student's total cash indebtedness for the current fall and spring 
terms for room, board, and tuition must be paid in full before 
November 1. Those rendered February 1 for the balance of the fall 
and spring terms must be paid in full before March 1. Bills for the 
summer term rendered July 1 must be paid in full before August 1. 
Failure to pay within the specified period automatically cancels the 
student's registration. 

No reduction or refund of the tuition charge will be made on 
account of absence, illness or dismissal during the year. If the stu- 
dent shall withdraw or be absent from college for any reason, there 
will be no reduction or refund because of failure to occupy the room 
assigned for that semester. In case of illness or absence for any other 
reasons from the college for six weeks or more, there will be a pro- 
portionate reduction for board provided that notice is given to 
the Bursar at the time of withdrawal. Fees cannot be refunded for 
any reason whatsoever. 

As an associate to The Tuition Plan the college is able to extend 
to parents or guardians the opportunity of paying tuition and other 
college fees in equal monthly installments during the college year. 
The additional cost is small. Adoption of this plan is optional and 
intended solely as a convenience. Details will be furnished on request. 

Additional expenses include textbooks which need not exceed 
$25-$40 a year and a $10 activities fee which supports the college's 
extracurricular program. A charge of $1.50 per term will be assessed 
for the use of radios. 



42 Haverford College 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

Scholarships are of two kinds, competitive, and those awarded 
upon merit and individual need. No one scholarship is given for 
more than one year. 

No scholarship will be given to a student who has a failure standing 
against him at the time of application. 

No scholarship will be given to a student whose college bill has 
not been paid in full. 

All preliminary correspondence and applications for undergradu- 
ate scholarships for 1945-1946, together with supporting letters from 
parents or guardians should be in the hands of the Vice-President 
before Tuesday, April the 3rd, 1945. 

It is assumed that requests for scholarships will not be made by 
those whose expenses can be met by their parents or from other 
sources. In the majority of cases the College expects work from 
scholarship students in an amount in proportion to the value of 
each scholarship. 

I. Corporation Scholarships. — Sixteen scholarships are awarded 
at the end of each term, without formal application, to the four stu- 
dents in each class having the highest average grades for the term 
then closing. In the case of the incoming Freshman Class the scholar- 
ships will be assigned immediately after the entrance examinations 

(see page 22) to those candidates entering by any plan of admission 
who are judged to be best prepared to do the work of the College. 
Corporation scholarships are in amount of 1 100.00 for the summer 
term and $150.00 for the fall and spring terms, respectively. 

II. Isaiah V. Williamson Scholarships. — Three scholarships nor- 
mally of $250 each, usually awarded to members of the Senior and 
Junior classes. 

III. Richard T. Jones Scholarship. — One scholarship normally of 
the annual value of $200. 

IV. Edward Yarnall Scholarship. — One scholarship normally of 
the annual value of $200. 

V. Thomas P. Cope Scholarship. — One scholarship normally of 
the annual value of 



VI. Sarah Marshall Scholarship. — One scholarship normally of 
the annual value of $200. 



Financial Arrangements 43 

VII. Mary M. Johnson Scholarship. — One scholarship normally 
of the annual value of $200. 

VIII. Joseph E. Gillingham Scholarships. — Four scholarships nor- 
mally of the annual value of $200 each "for meritorious students." 

IX. Isaac Thome Johnson Scholarship. — One scholarship nor- 
mally of the annual value of $225 available for a student of Wilming- 
ton College or a member of Wilmington (Ohio) Yearly Meeting 
of Friends. 

X. Jacob P. Jones Scholarships normally amount to $1500 an- 
nually. Usually these will be awarded in sums of $150 each, and 
in return for them certain academic duties may be required of the 
beneficiaries. 

XI. Jacob P. Jones Scholarships. — Eight scholarships normally 
of the annual value of $100 each. 

XII. Caspar Wistar Memorial Scholarship. — A scholarship of $250 
is usually available, preferably for sons of parents engaged in Chris- 
tian service, including secretaries of Young Men's Christian Associa- 
tions, or students desiring to prepare for similar service in America 
or other countries. 

XIII. Louis Jaquette Palmer Memorial Scholarship. — This schol- 
arship of $200 is awarded on application, preferably to a member of 
the Freshman Class, who in the opinion of a committee representing 
the donors and the President of the College shall give evidence of 
possessing the qualities of leadership and constructive interest in 
student and community welfare which his friends observed in Louis 
Jaquette Palmer of the Class of 1894. 

XIV. /. Kennedy Moorhouse Memorial Scholarship, $300. — 
Intended for the member of the Freshman Class who shall appear 
best fitted to uphold at Haverford the standard of character and 
conduct typified by the late J. Kennedy Moorhouse, of the Class of 
1900 — "a man modest, loyal, courageous, reverent without sancti- 
mony; a lover of hard play and honest work, a leader in clean and 
joyous living." 

XV. Paul W. Newhall Memorial Scholarship. — One scholarship 
normally of the annual value of $200. 

XVI. Robert Martin Zuckert Memorial Scholarships. — Two or 



44 Haverford College 

more scholarships of the annual value of $250, preference to be given 
to "a native of New York or Connecticut and who now resides in 
one of those states." 

XVII. Samuel E. Hilles Memorial Scholarship. — One scholarship 
normally of the annual value of 



XVIII. Class of 1913 Scholarship. — One scholarship of the annual 
value of about $125. Preference is to be given to sons of members 
of the Class of 1913 who may apply and who meet the usual require- 
ments of the College. 

XIX. Isaac Sharpless Scholarship Fund. — Founded in 1941. 
Scholarships open to graduates of secondary schools and undergrad- 
uates of Haverford College. Awards based upon fulfilment by appli- 
cant of requirements used in selection of Rhodes Scholars to the 
University of Oxford. Awards granted from list submitted to Selec- 
tion Committee by the Director of Admissions, subject always to 
final approval by the President of the College; amount variable. 

XX. Class of 1917 Scholarship. — One scholarship of the annual 
value of about $150. Preference is to be given to sons of members 
of the Class of 1917 who may apply and who meet the usual require- 
ments of the College. 

XXI. The Geoffrey Silver Memorial Scholarship. — A scholarship 
in the sum of $500 will be available to a Public School graduate in 
this general area who may enter Haverford. 

XXII. Daniel B. Smith Fund for Scholarships. — Founded Octo- 
ber 6, 1943, by gift of $2500 from Anna Wharton Wood of Waltham, 
Massachusetts. This will be increased by a bequest of $2500 made 
by Miss Esther Morton Smith of Germantown, Philadelphia, who 
died March 18, 1942. 

"The income is to be used, in the discretion of the Faculty, as an 
annual scholarship for some young man needing financial aid in his 
College course." Preference is to be given to a descendant of their 
father, Benjamin R. Smith, if any such should apply. 

XXIII. Sarah Tatum Hilles Memorial Scholarship Fund. — 
Founded November 1, 1943, by bequest of $75,534.58 from Joseph T. 
Hilles, 1888, in memory of his mother, Sarah Tatum Hilles, "to pro- 
vide for such number of annual scholarships of $250 each as such 
income shall be sufficient to create"; to be awarded by the Managers 
upon "needy and deserving students, and to be known as 'Sarah 
Tatum Hilles Memorial Scholarships.' " 



Financial Arrangements 45 

XXIV. Elihii Grant Memorial Scholarship Fund. — Established 
February 2, 1944, by Mrs. Elihu Grant "to commemorate the service 
to Haverford College of Dr Elihu Grant, from 1917 to 1938 a mem- 
ber of the College Faculty. The income from this fund is applied to 
scholarship assistance to students in Humanistic studies, primarily 
those specializing in the study of Biblical Literature and Oriental 
Subjects." In special circumstances the income may be utilized to 
assist those working for a postgraduate degree at Haverford College. 

Most of the scholarships listed above are permanent founda- 
tions. In addition, the alumni in various districts support regional 
scholarships. 

FELLOWSHIPS 

The Clementine Cope Fellowship, of the annual value of $700, 
may be awarded by the Faculty to the best qualified applicant from 
the Senior Class. He is required to spend the succeeding year in 
study at some American or foreign university approved by the 
Faculty. Applications for the Clementine Cope Fellowship should 
be in the hands of the President of the College before March 1. 

Teaching Fellowships. — With the remaining funds from the 
Clementine Cope Foundation there may be appointed one or more 
graduates of Haverford College as Teaching Fellows, with or without 
specific duties at Haverford College; or a second Cope Fellow may 
be appointed with a stipend of $400 or $500, as the income of the 
Fund may permit. 

Graduate Fellowships. — For information regarding graduate fel- 
lowships, see page 30. 

LOAN FUND 

A loan fund is available for deserving students, other than mem- 
bers of the Freshman Class and transfer students during their first 
year, who may require financial assistance during their college course. 
Federal emergency scholarships for accelerating students are also 
available. 

PLACEMENT BUREAU 

The Placement Bureau is planning for active functioning when 
Haverfordians are again free to avail themselves of its services. 
During the emergency a start has been made in assembling pertinent 
records on recent students and in locating future employment oppor- 
tunities. Part-time work is found for those who desire it while in 
college. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 
THE LIBRARY 

The Haverford College Library building, located near the center 
of the campus, illustrates the steady growth of the college in facilities 
for study and research. The original building, constructed in 1860, 
now forms the north wing of the Library. To this first structure three 
successive additions have been made. The latest of these, a commo- 
dious Stack and a Treasure Room, was dedicated in April, 1941. 
The Mary Newlin Smith Memorial Garden adjoins the south side of 
the Library building. 

The Haverford Library collection now contains about 164,000 
volumes. Over four hundred literary and scientific periodicals are 
taken. Library endowments provide six thousand dollars yearly for 
the purchase of books. The Library is also a depository of govern- 
ment publications. 

With the exception of certain rare books, all volumes in the Library' 
are freely accessible to readers. Though designed especially for the 
use of officers and students of the college, the Library affords to others 
the privilege of consulting and, under certain restrictions, of with- 
drawing books. The Library is open on week days from 8:00 a.m. 
to 10:00 P.M., and on Sundays from 1:30 to 10:00 p.m. Special hours 
are arranged for vacation periods. 

The Gummere-Morley Memorial Reading Room, decorated and 
equipped by the Class of 1892, provides a special reading and brows- 
ing room for Haverford students. 

Rare books and special collections are kept in the Treasure Room, 
where both permanent and temporary exhibitions are held. The 
Treasure Room is open from 9 to 5 (Saturdays, 9 to 12) . 

Special Collections. The Quaker collection, containing both books 
and manuscripts, is probably the most complete in America. It forms 
a central repository for Friends' literature in this country, and makes 
Haverford a prime source for the study of the Society of Friends, 

The William H. Jenks collection of Friends' tracts, mostly of the 
seventeenth century, numbers about fifteen hundred separately 
bound titles. 

The Rufus M. Jones collection on Mysticism contains almost a 
thousand books and pamphlets from the fifteenth century to the 
present day. 

The Tobias collection of the writings of Rufus M. Jones is prac- 

46 



General Information 47 

tically complete. It consists of 168 separate volumes and 16 boxes 
of pamphlets and extracts. 

The Charles Roberts autograph collection contains more than 
20,000 items, embracing not only autograph letters of authors, states- 
men, scientists, ecclesiastics, monarchs, and others, but also several 
series of valuable papers on religious and political history. 

The Christopher Morley collection of autograph letters comprises 
about 200 letters and memoranda selected by Mr. Morley from his 
correspondence files. Over 100 authors are represented. 

The Harris collection of ancient and oriental manuscripts con- 
tains over sixty Hebrew, Greek, Latin, Arabic, Syriac, and Ethiopian 
rolls and codices, collected by J. Rendel Harris. 

Cooperative Services. Haverford maintains a cooperative arrange- 
ment with Bryn Mawr and Swarthmore whereby the facilities of the 
libraries of all three colleges are open to the faculty and students of 
each of the colleges. 

The Philadelphia Bibliographical Center and Union Library 
Catalog, which includes in one alphabetical file a record of all books 
in over one hundred and fifty libraries of the Philadelphia region, 
enables users of the Haverford Library to locate books in the largest 
cooperative catalog in America. The Haverford Library is also a 
member of The Philadelphia Metropolitan Library Council. 

The Library Associates. The newly organized Associates of the 
Haverford Library is an organization of graduates and friends of the 
college, devoted to increasing the usefulness of the Library. It serves 
to bring the facilities of the Library to a wider notice, to make these 
available to the whole Haverford community, to encourage the mak- 
ing of gifts to the Library, and to aid in the use of the Library for 
exhibition purposes. Enquiries should be addressed to The Librarian, 
Haverford College. 

ART COLLECTION 

The Haverford Art Collection, including paintings and drawings 
by Pintorrichio, Whistler, Inness, Sargent, and Turner, is displayed 
in the Library. 

MUSIC ROOM AND CONCERTS 

The Alfred Percival Smith Rooms in the Union now provide a 
music center for the college. There is a room for the Music Library 
and Departmental office, with a larger instruction room adjoining 
containing the Carnegie collection and supplement of recordings. 
This room is used for informal concerts by the Department of Music. 
The phonograph and records may be used by students on Wednesday 



48 Haverford College 

evenings, Saturday afternoons and evenings, and Sunday afternoons 
and evenings. 

The Department of Music offered three public concerts in the 
summer of 1944, and plans at least four such concerts for the aca- 
demic year 1944-45. These concerts, which present both professional 
artists and organizations, as well as local musicians, are open to stu- 
dents and the Haverford community. The Department of Music 
is presenting a series of concerts in the Music Room this season. 

LECTURES 

The Haverford Library Lectures and The Shipley Lectures, both 
endowed lectureships, provide annual speakers. The endowment for 
the former, a gift from the estate of Mary Farnum Brown, is avail- 
able "for an annual course or series of lectures before the Senior Class 
of the College, and other students, on the Bible, its history and litera- 
ture, and as a way may open for it, upon its doctrine and its teaching." 
The fund for the latter was presented by Samuel R. Shipley, in mem- 
ory of his father, Thomas Shipley. The income from the Shipley 
fund is used "for lectures on English literature." 

Other lectures sponsored by departments in the college, especially 
that of government, are offered at various times throughout the 
year. Most of these are open to the public. 

THE MAIN LINE FORUM 

In 1944 Haverford College opened its Main Line Forum. This 
forum, with meetings in Roberts Hall on Wednesday or Thursday 
evenings, is devoted to a discussion of the problems of citizenship in 
a democracy. The speakers are leaders actually responsible for deci- 
sions in dealing with these problems. Each meeting consists of short 
addresses by the speakers of the evening, followed by open discussions. 

For the season of 1944-1945 the forum is centered around three 
series of problems. From October to December topics relate specifi- 
cally to American problems; the remaining two series of discussions 
are devoted to European and Asiatic problems, respectively. 

Meetings are open, free of charge, to students of Haverford Col- 
lege and nearby schools, as well as to residents of the Philadelphia 
suburban area, upon application for tickets to the Secretary of the 
Main Line Forum, Haverford College. Programs may also be 
obtained by application to the Secretary. 

Students from the cooperating colleges, high schools and private 
schools of the area are chosen to hold a private seminar led by the 
speakers in connection with each discussion. 



General Information 49 

Haverford College is aided in its sponsorship of The Main Line 
Forum by the National Foundation for Education in American 
Citizenship. 

THE BUCKY FOUNDATION 

The Bucky Foundation, which has as its goal the promotion of a 
spiritually groimded political and economic order, and the training 
of responsible citizens for such an order, maintains its office in the 
Haverford Union building. It has sponsored the Constructive Citi- 
zenship program, in cooperation with Bryn Mawr and Swarthmore 
colleges, which has provided training in the U. S. Employment Serv- 
ice for students of Haverford, Bryn Mawr, and Swarthmore. The 
foundation is now encouraging the work of Reconstruction and 
Relief training at Haverford. 

THE MORRIS INFIRMARY 

The Morris Infirmary, presented by John T. Morris, '67, contains 
ten beds, a surgical room, an isolation ward for contagious diseases, 
its own kitchen, and accommodations for a physician and a nurse. 
Every provision has been made for medical and surgical treatment 
of all cases among students during the college year. The danger of 
infection through illness in the college dormitories is thus minimized. 

No charge is made for dispensary treatments, for the services of 
the college physician and the nurse, or for residence in the infirmary 
not exceeding one week in each case of illness. Any additional medi- 
cal or surgical service, including special examinations which cannot 
be made in the infumary, will be at the expense of the student. 
For residence in the infirmary beyond the limit of one week the 
charge is $3 a day. 

Dr. Herbert W. Taylor is the physician in charge. Miss Mabel S. 
Beard the resident nurse. 

SOCIETIES AND ORGANIZATIONS 

The Students' Association. This organization is composed of all 
undergraduates in good standing at Haverford. It is the body for 
student self-government at Haverford. On its Council are represen- 
tatives of the four classes and of publications. 

PJii Beta Kappa. The Haverford Chapter of the Phi Beta Kappa 
Society is Zeta of Pennsylvania, chartered in 1898. Elections at 
Haverford are held for students at the end of the junior year and 
at the end of the senior year. 

Founders Club. This Haverford honorary society, established in 
1914 as an organization of students, alumni, and faculty, seeks to 
recognize by election to its membership those undergraduates who 



50 Haverford College 

combine a sound academic record with noteworthy participation in 
extra-curricular activities. Elections are usually made from the 
junior and senior classes, except in unusual cases where sophomores 
are chosen. 

Cap and Bells Club. The Haverford dramatic organization, com- 
posed of graduates and undergraduates, sponsors dramatic produc- 
tions. The Club has collaborated with those of Bryn Mawr and 
Swarthmore in putting on plays and musical productions. 

Nautical Club. The Club provides intercollegiate racing and gen- 
eral sailing for members who have had some experience and those 
who desire to learn to sail. It keeps four dinghies on the Delaware 
river. Intercollegiate meets are held each semester and teams have 
gone to Annapolis, Boston, and the Coast Guard Academy in 
New London. 

Radio Club. A campus broadcasting station is operated as Sta- 
tion WHAV. Programs are presented throughout the year. 

Campus Club. A group of alumni and friends of the college who 
are interested in preserving and improving the natural beauty of the 
campus is organized as The Campus Club. The planning is done by 
an executive committee which meets biannually for the purpose of 
laying out new projects. The Arboretum and Woolman Walk were 
developed and are maintained by The Campus Club. 

Other Organizations. The following groups are also active at 
Haverford: Glee Club, Varsity Club, Debate Council, Biology Club, 
Chemistry Club, Classical Symposium, Engineering Club, Interna- 
tional Relations Club, Mathematics-Physics Club. 

PUBLICATIONS 

Official Publications. The college publishes annually the Haver- 
ford College Catalog, the President's Report, the Treasurer's Report, 
the Report of the Librarian and publications of the faculty, and the 
College Directory. 

The Haverford Review, published two to three times annually, is 
an illustrated alumni magazine, devoted to the interests of the entire 
Haverford community. It provides a forum for the discussion of the 
problems and functions of the small liberal arts college in America. 
Annual subscription |1. Enquiries should be addressed to The Man- 
aging Editor, The Haverford Review, Haverford College. 

The Haverford News, a student publication, appears weekly dur- 
ing the college year. Each issue contains a section of Alumni news. 
The Record, senior yearbook, is distributed immediately before 
commencement. 



General Information 



51 



SPECIAL PLANS OF STUDY IN PREPARATION 
FOR PROFESSIONS 

A large number of Haverford College students desire on gradua- 
tion to enter upon courses of study fitting them for professions. 
For students desiring preparation for the professional schools in 
engineering, medicine, and other highly specialized subjects, the Col- 
lege offers combinations of courses which admit to the best profes- 
sional schools in the country with full standing, and in many cases 
with advanced credit. 

To illustrate this feature of the curriculum there are presented on 
the following pages sample outlines of study for the four years, pre- 
paratory to specialization in Engineering, Medicine, Law, and Busi- 
ness Administration. Similar outlines might be prepared for other 
professions — Teaching, the Ministry, Journalism, Industrial Chem- 
istry, etc. The student will in all cases consult with the Dean and the 
professors concerned in his choice of courses. 

Each of the outlines following is of course a sample only, present- 
ing one among many possibilities, and is not intended to be a pre- 
scribed program. 

Preparation for Engineering. — Engineering today covers an 
extremely broad field of service, and there is accordingly no standard 
type of training suitable for all students preparing themselves for 
an engineering career. A typical four-year course in general engi- 
neering follows: 



Freshman Year 
Principles of Engineering Drawing and 

Shop Methods 
Engineering Orientation and Surveying 
Inorganic Chemistry and Qualitative 

Analysis 
Mathematics 

English Composition and Literature 
Foreign Language 

Junior Year 
Elements of Applied Electricity 
Alternating Currents 
Thermodynamics 
Fluid Mechanics 
Materials of Engineering 
Advanced Calculus and Differential 

Equations 
Government and Business 
Introduction to Sociology 
Industry and Society 
Seminar in Engineering 



Sophomore Year 
Kinematics of Machines 
Analytical Mechanics 
General Physics 
Calculus 

Elementary Economics 
American History 



Senior Year 
Heat Engineering 
Strength of Materials 
Machine Design 
Special Project in Engineering 
Internal Combustion Engines 
Accounting (or Statistics) 
English Elective 
The Corporation 
Labor Policies and Business 

Management 
Seminar in Engineering 



52 Haverford College 

Preparation for Medicine. — In consequence of the relatively 
large number of students preparing for a career in medicine the pre- 
medical course has become a distinctive feature of the work of the 
College. The course is under the direction of the Premedical Com- 
mittee of the Faculty, the members of which stand ready to advise 
students on matters of premedical interest. The program of studies 
includes, in addition to the course in Freshman English and the 
limited electives required for graduation, the courses in the pre- 
medical sciences, biology, chemistry, and physics, which meet the 
requirements for admission to medical school and of the State and 
National licensing boards. Apart from these requirements a sufficient 
number of electives remain available to enable the student to obtain 
a well balanced education. 

A premedical student will ordinarily major in a science subject but 
his choice is not restricted, since he can complete the requirements 
of almost any Major and at the same time meet the medical school 
requirements for admission. However, he must do better than aver- 
age work in the premedical sciences in order to qualify for a favorable 
recommendation by the Premedical Committee. A special Premedi- 
cal Major is in process of formation. 

In the typical premedical program given below, the courses re- 
quired or specifically advised by most medical schools are starred. 
The electives must be so chosen as to satisfy the college require- 
ments with regard to limited electives and concentration in a Major 
field of study and also to meet any special requirements of the medi- 
cal school to which application is to be made. In general, in order to 
avoid conflicts between necessary courses and to avoid overloading 
with laboratory work in the Junior and Senior years, the science 
courses should be taken in the order and in the years indicated. 

First Year Second Year 

English Composition and Literature* English Literature* 

Inorganic Chemistry* Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis* 

General Zoology* General Physics* 

Elementary German (or French) * Intermediate German (or French) * 

Freshman Mathematics Elective 

Junior Year Senior Year 

Organic Chemistry* Physical Chemistry* 

Vertebrate Morphology* Advanced Biology 

Psychology ( one term) * Advanced Organic Chemistry* 

Sociology (one term) * Electives 
Electives 



General Information 



53 



Preparation for the Law. — Even those law schools which require 
that a person must hold a college degree to be eligible for admission 
do not usually specify what studies he shall have pursued in his 
undergraduate course. It is obvious, however, that a choice of elec- 
tives may be made which will be of great value to the student later 
in the study of law and in the practice of his profession. It is recom- 
mended that the following courses be included in a student's pro- 
gram. In the case of those advanced courses which are given only in 
alternate years some variation in this program may be necessary. 



Freshman Year 
English Composition and Literature 
Foreign Language, preferably Latin 
A Modern Foreign Language 
Mathematics 
American Federal Government 

Junior Year 

Elementary Psychology 
English Constitutional History 
Roman Law 

Government and Business 
Constitutional Law 
Accounting 



Sophomore Year 
American History 
Elementary Economics 
Contemporary Legislation 
English, Mediaeval, or Modern Euio 

pean History 
State and Local Government 

Senior Year 

American History 

English Literature 

English, Mediaeval, or Modern Euro- 
pean History 

The Corporation 
Government Finance 

Development of Political Thought 



Preparation for Business Administration. — Students planning to 
continue study at a graduate school of business administration or to 
engage directly in business might arrange their programs for their 
Freshman and Sophomore years as above suggested for those plan- 
ing to study law, but for their Junior and Senior years the following 
courses are recommended. 



Senior Year 
Ethics 

National Income and Investment 
International Trade and Finance 
Government and Business 



Junior Year 
Industry and Society 
Labor Organization and Business 

Management 
Money and Banking 
Accounting 

Introduction to Statistics 
The Corporation 

Students expecting to enter manufacturing industries in any 
capacity are encouraged to take courses in Chemistry, Engineering, 
or Physics in order to become acquainted with the general nature of 
the processes and techniques involved in modern manufacturing. 



54 Haverford College 

Preparation for Public Administration. — Students who are inter- 
ested in entering the government service for work in Public Admin- 
istration should have courses in Elementary Economics, American 
History and Government, National Income and Investment, Political 
Theory, Government Finance, Accounting, Statistics, Public Admin- 
istration, Constitutional Law, and Government and Business. 

Each year the United States Government holds an examination 
for filling vacancies in the field of Public Administration, which is 
covered by these courses given by the College. 



cv9Go 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

The normal course at Haverford College, except in modern lan- 
guages, is three hours per week. The laboratory equivalent for a lec- 
ture hour is customarily two and one half hours. Variations in this 
general rule are noted in the listing of the particular course. Some 
of the courses listed are not offered during the current year, 

ART 

Given by the History of Art Department 
AT Bryn Mawr College 

The instruction in Art has a twofold objective. On the one hand, 
the students' appreciation is furthered by close aesthetic analysis of 
works of art. On the other hand, the history of art is treated as a 
branch of the humanistic studies and attention is given to the devel- 
opment of Art in itself as well as to its contacts with other human 
interests. 

At Haverford the Carnegie set of reproductions and at Bryn Mawr 
a large collection of photographs are available as additional illus- 
trative material. 

All lectures are illustrated by lantern slides. 

Major Requirements 

The undergraduate instruction offered in this department includes three units 
of undergraduate first and second year work and two and one-half units of 
advanced undergraduate and free elective courses. Students majoring in the his- 
tory of art will be required to concentrate in either the field of Mediaeval Art, 
Renaissance Art or Modern Art. For details of the comprehensive examination 
see the Bryn Mawr College Calendar. 

Special work is offered to students recommended by the department for honors 
in history of art, in either Mediaeval Art, Renaissance Art or Modern Art. It in- 
volves a scheme of reading and individual conferences and includes the preparation 
of reports and special examinations. 

101. An Introduction to the History of Art — Mr. Tselos, assisted by Miss 
Wade. 

This course is designed to give the student an understanding of art in its philo- 
sophic, technical, social and historical aspects, thereby laying a basis for more 
advanced work in the department. The discussion of general problems will be 
followed by an analysis of the different periods of art, of the interests that pre- 
vailed during them, and of the formal expression given to such interests. At cer- 
tain points in the course the lectures will be given by guest lecturers from other 
departments. 

201. Italian Art — Miss Jenkins. 

The development of the major arts in Italy is traced from the beginnings of the 
Renaissance in the thirteenth century to the Rococo style of the eighteenth. 
Architecture and sculpture are considered independently as well as in relation to 
the stylistic evolution of painting. 

55 



56 Haverford College 

202. History of European Painting after 1550 — Miss Jenkins. 

The evolution of painting outside Italy from the middle of the sixteenth century 
to the French Revolution is traced in the first semester, followed in the second by a 
consideration of the art movements of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. 

203. Romanesque and Gothic Art and Architecture — Mr. Tselos, Miss 
Jenkins. 

An understanding of Christian mediaeval art is sought through its roots in 
religion, philosophy and social conditions. Emphasis is laid on the great cathe- 
drals, studied in their liturgical, iconographic and artistic aspects; while the gen- 
eral development of the Romanesque and Gothic styles is traced from the eleventh 
to the fifteenth century. 

204b. Chinese Art. 

From the earliest dynasties to modern times. 

301c. The Art of the Northern Renaissance. 

The course covers the development of representative art in the Netherlands, 
France, Germany, Spain and England from the later fourteenth century to the 
later sixteenth. Special emphasis is laid upon the International Style, the reawaken- 
ing of a sense of nature in Flemish painting, and upon the art of Diirer and his con- 
temporaries. The technique and development of the graphic arts are also explained. 

302b. Post-Renaissance and Modem Architecture in Europe and America — 

Miss Jenkins. 

A discussion of the varying forms taken by the Renaissance style in combination 
with the different national building traditions of Europe and the rise of eclecticism 
in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries will be followed by an analysis of the 
advance of structural technique with the machine age and the attempt to formu- 
late an architecture suited to the modern world. 

303a. Early Mediaeval Art — Mr. Tselos. 

The formation of Christian art from the pagan traditions of the antique world, 
and its subsequent development in the eastern Mediterranean and the Latin West 
will be traced to the beginning of the Romanesque era in the eleventh century. 
The arts discussed will include architecture, sculpture, painting, mosaic, illumina- 
tion and ivory carving. 

ASTRONOMY 

The William J. Strawbridge Memorial Observatory enables stu- 
dents to become familiar with a variety of astronomical instruments, 
and to acquire from actual observation a practical acquaintance 
with astronomy. 

The equipment consists of three equatorially mounted telescopes, 
a 10-inch and a 4i/4-inch refractor and a 6-inch reflector; a reflecting 
telescope with 8-inch mirror and altazimuth mounting; a meridian 
circle telescope of 3^-inch aperture; a zenith telescope of 2i4-inch 
aperture; a spectrohelioscope; an astrographic mounting provided 
with two 4-inch Ross lenses and a 4-inch guiding telescope; two 
sidereal clocks; a chronograph by Bond, and other instruments. The 
astronomical library is housed in the Observatory. 

Major Retjuirements 

Either Astronomy la and 2b and four one term courses to be chosen from Astron- 
omy 5a, 6b; 7a, 8b; 9a, 10b. Three courses to be chosen from Mathematics 2, 3 
and Physics 2, 3. 



Courses of Instruction 57 

A comprehensive examination, partly oral, based on the subject matter of the 
above-named courses. 

la. Descriptive Astronomy — Mr. Green. 

A general course open to all students. 

The leading facts of astronomy, with elementary explanation of the methods 
and instruments by which they are ascertained. A portion of the time is devoted 
to the study of the constellations, the handling of the telescopes, and simple 
problems. No fee. 

2b. Celestial Navigation — Mr. Green and Mr. Macintosh. 

The determination of position and course at sea and in the air by trigonometric, 
graphical, and tabular methods. Mathematical aspects of piloting, such as the 
problems of interception and of return to a moving base, will be emphasized. 
Sextant observations will be taken and reduced. Prerequisite, Plane Trigonometry. 
A fee of $7.00 per semester is charged. 

5a, 6b. Observational Astronomy — Mr. Green. 

The subject matter Avill be chosen to meet the needs of the students. A fee of 
$7.50 per semester is charged. 

7a, 8b. Celestial Mechanics and Orbit Determination — Mr. Green. 

An introduction to mathematical astronomy. Prerequisite, Mathematics 3, or in 
conjunction with Mathematics 3. No fee. 

9a, 10b. Astrophysics — Mr. Green. 

A study of the state of matter in interstellar space, in the atmospheres of the 
stars and in their interiors. Prerequisites, Physics 2 and Mathematics 2. No fee. 

BIBLICAL LITERATURE 

The courses in this department are designed to cover broadly the 
history, literature and religion of the Bible with their backgrounds 
in the culture in which they developed and to which they contributed. 
Additional courses are offered in the ancient history of the Near East, 
the Hebrew language, and comparative religion. Sufficient scope is 
thus provided to meet the varied interests of students electing courses 
in the department and to offer either introductory or advanced work. 

A gift enabled the late Professor Grant to make a series of five field 
excavations at a site in Palestine, the archaeological yields of which 
are exhibited in the Beth Shemesh Museum, third floor of Sharpless 
Hall. These materials reveal the life of a typical Near East commu- 
nity in the many aspects of its development and interplay with other 
peoples over a span of 2000 years. Thus, the collections provide a 
laboratory for study of the cultural cross-currents which met in 
Palestine during one of the great formative periods of civilization. 

Major Requirements 

Six half-year courses in Biblical Literature. 

Six other half-year courses in either Biblical Literature or related departments. 
Special study of one selected Biblical field, e.g., history, literature, the Old or 
New Testament. 



58 Haverford College 

A comprehensive examination covering the history, literature, and criticism of 
the Bible; and the religious and moral life of the Hebrews, Jews, and Christians. 

la. Introduction to the Old and New Testaments. 

The literature of the Bible with its historical background. 

2b. The Rise of Christianity — Mr. Flight. 

A study of the background, early development and spread of the Christian 
movement, up to the third century, as reflected in the New Testament, par- 
ticularly in the book of Acts and the letters of Paul, and in the writings of the 
Church Fathers. 

4b. Development of Christian Thought within the Bible — Mr. Flight, 

A study of the origins and development of the basic ideas in the teaching of 
religious leaders from the prophets to Paul. 

5a. Ancient History of the Near East — Mr. Flight. 

The Beginnings of Western Civilization in the Cultures of the Near East; 
Archaeological and Historical. 

(Also called History 8a.) 

6b. Comparative Religion — Mr. Flight. 

A comparative study of the great living religions, their founders, their scrip- 
tures, their characteristic ideas and ideals. 

8b. The English Bible — Mr. Flight. 

History and literary art of the English Bible, particularly the King James version 
and its influence on general literature. 

(Also called English 86.) 

9a or 10b. Biblical and Oriental Conference — Mr. Flight. 

Individual work to be elected by the student from one or more of the following 
divisions of the field: literature, archaeology, history, philosophy. Prerequisite, 
other work in the department, in which a grade of B has been attained. 

11. Hebrew — Mr. Flight. 

Grammar, composition, and reading of simple Old Testament prose. 

BIOLOGY 

The Department of Biology offers courses for students who wish 
to enter medical school; for students who wish to engage in graduate 
work, teaching, or conservation; and for students who wish a general 
knowledge of plants and animals. 

Most medical schools require General Zoology for admission. 
Vertebrate Morphology is required by some and advised by others. 
General Botany is required by a few. Most graduate schools require, 
as a prerequisite for work in Biology, a reading knowledge of French 
and German, Chemistry 1 or 2 and 4, Physics 1 or 2 (or Geology 1, 
depending on the student's field of interest) , and at least Biology 1 
and 2. For advanced experimental Biology, Chemistry 4 may be 
necessary. 

A gift from the class of 1915 enables the department to house and 
display the extensive collections of the college so that they are 
available to anyone interested in the natural history of the Phila- 
delphia area. 



Courses of Instruction 59 

Major Requirements 

Biology 1, 2a, 7, 8b and one of 3, 4, and 5. 

Two courses chosen from Physics 1, 1-2, or 2, Chemistry 1 or 2, Math. 13a, and 
Geology 1. 

Reading and reporting on approximately 15 biological books, besides those read 
in connection with courses. This is to be done at any time between the end of 
sophomore year and date of the comprehensive examination. 

A comprehensive examination on the courses taken and the reading done is 
required to be passed. This examination will be partly written (approximately 
4 hours) , and partly oral. 

1. General Zoology — Four hours. Mr. Dunn, Mr. Henry and Mr. Evans. 

The lectures of this course include a survey of the structure and relationships of 
animals, of the fundamental principles of living organisms, and an outline of the 
more important questions relating to evolution, heredity, and distribution. The 
laboratory periods are devoted to obtaining an acquaintance with the more impor- 
tant types of animal life. Two lectures and two laboratory periods a week. A fee of 
$8.00 per semester is charged. 

2a. General Botany — Four hours. Mr. Henry. 

The fundamental principles of Botany and the application of plant science to 
human welfare are discussed in the lectures. The laboratory work consists of a 
study of the morphology, physiology, and life history of representatives of the 
principal groups of plants. This is a brief course designed to fit the needs of the 
student not majoring in science. A fee of $8.00 per semester is charged. 

3. Vertebrate Morphology — Three hours. Mr. Dunn, Mr. Henry, Mr. Evans. 
The laboratory work of this course includes the dissection of the principal types 

of vertebrates. The lectures deal with the origin, status, and evolution of the organ 
systems of vertebrates. One lecture and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequi- 
site, Biology 1. A fee of $7.50 per semester is charged. 

4. Local Flora — Mr. Henry. 

The work of this course consists of the identification of representative Angio- 
sperms, together with the study of their taxonomy and distribution. Collecting in 
the field will supplement laboratory work. One lecture and two laboratory periods 
a week. Prerequisite, Biology 2a and 8b. A fee of $7.50 per semester is charged. 

5. Entomology — Mr. Henry. 

This course has been designed to give the student a knowledge of the anatomy 
and physiology of insects. The laboratory work consists of the dissection of a rep- 
resentative of each of the larger Orders. Particular emphasis is placed on the 
structures used in identification, and permanent mounts are made of many of 
them. The preparation of local collections is required as part of the work. One 
lecture and two laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite, Biology 1. A fee of $7.50 
per semester is charged. 

7. Evolution, Heredity, and Other General Biological Problems — Mr. Dunn. 

This is a general cultural course, intended not only for students of Biology, but 
for all who wish to be informed on recent developments in the field of biology, 
especially for students of Sociology, Philosophy and History. Special emphasis is 
given to the modern theories of evolution and of heredity. Open, without pre- 
requisite, to Juniors and Seniors. No fee. 

8b. Systematic Botany — Mr. Henry. 

This course, a continuation of Biology 2a, consists of a systematic study of the 
major plant groups. Prerequisite, Biology 2a. A fee of $7.50 is charged. 

10. Seminar Courses — Required of candidates for Honors in Biology. 

Open only by permission of the Instructor. 

Vertebrate Zoology — Classification and evolution of vertebrate groups. Pre- 
requisite, Biology 1, Biology 3 or with Biology 3. Mr. Dunn. 



60 Haverford College 

Advanced Morphology — Study of morphological problems in animals. Pre- 
requisite, Biology 3. Mr. Dunn. 

Ecology and Distribution — Problems of habitat relationships or geographical 
relationship of plants and/or animals. Prerequisite, Biology 1 or Biology 2a and 8b. 
Mr. Dunn, Mr. Henry, and Mr. Evans. 

Genetics — Problems of Genetics. Primarily for Graduate Students. Mr. Dunn. 

Advanced Botany — Studies in comparative anatomy of plants. Prerequsite, 
Biology 2a, 4, Sb. Mr. Henry. No fixed fee. 

CHEMISTRY 

The courses required for the Chemistry Major are designed to give 
the student a comprehensive knowledge of the fundamentals of 
chemistry which will qualify him for entrance to medical school or 
for non-professional chemical work. A student who plans to enter 
medical school should take, regardless of the department in which he 
majors, Chemistry 1 (or its equivalent) , 2, 3, 4, and 5. 

Haverford College has been placed by the American Chemical 
Society on the approved list of institutions for the training of pro- 
fessional chemists. For a departmental recommendation for graduate 
work in chemistry, or a position as professional chemist, a student 
must complete the following courses in chemistry and other subjects: 
Chemistry 1 (or its equivalent) , 2, 3, 4, 5, 11a or \2b, 13a, 146, \ba, 
and an additional half-year course in chemistry; Mathematics 2; 
Physics 2; German 2. 

Major Requirements 

Chemistry 1 (or its equivalent) , 2, 3, 4, 5 and an additional half-year course in 
chemistry, and to courses in related departments. The major examination will 
cover the chemistry courses listed above. 

Seniors majoring in the department will meet during the second half-year with 
members of the staff for a critical discussion of the chemical principles studied in 
the courses and of the applications of these principles. 

Candidates for final honors in chemistry are required to take during the Junior 
and Senior years at least four of the short courses offered by the Department 
such as: Chemical German reading, history of chemistry, glassblowing, chemical 
industry, physiological chemistry, the chemistry of the rarer metals, and special 
topics in inorganic chemistry. 

1. Introductory General Chemistry — Four hours. Mr. Cadbury. 

Primarily for Freshmen and Sophomores who have not had chemistry in pre- 
paratory school. Additional reading required of Juniors and Seniors. 

Lectures and laboratory work dealing with the preparation, properties, and 
uses of the more common elements and their compounds; fundamental laws and 
theories; and the general principles of chemistry applied to industrial processes. 
A fee of $5.00 per semester is charged. 

2. Theoretical Inorganic Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis — Four hours. 
Mr. Meldrum and Mr. Coffin. 

Primarily for Freshmen and Sophomores who have had chemistry in prepara- 
tory school or who have passed Chemistry 1. Fundamental laws and theories. 
Reaction velocity and equilibrium. Theories of ionization and atomic structure 



Courses of Instruction 61 

applied to explain solution and electrolytic phenomena and the mechanism of 
chemical reactions. Qualitative analysis using semimicro methods constitutes the 
laboratory work. A fee of $6.00 per semester is charged. 

3. Quantitative Analysis — Four hours. Mr. Meldrum. 

Lectures on the general principles of gravimetric, volumetric, electrolytic, and 
other methods of analysis. In the laboratory, typical methods are applied. Pre- 
requisite, Chemistry 2 and Mathematics 1. A fee of $6.00 per semester is charged. 

4. Organic Chemistry — Four hours. Mr. Meldrum. 

A study of aliphatic, aromatic, and heterocyclic compounds. Prerequisite, 
Chemistry 2. A fee of $6.00 per semester is charged. 

5. Physical Chemistry — Four hours. Mr. Cadbury. 

A systematic study of the principles of physical chemistry, including the ideal 
gas, real gases, liquids, solids, solutions, electrical conductivity, electromotive force, 
hydrogen ion concentration, reaction velocity, hemogeneous and heterogeneous 
equilibria, adsorption, catalysis and colloids. Prerequisite, Chemistry 3. A fee 
of $6.00 per semester is charged. 

11a. Chemical Thermodynamics — Mr. Cadbury. 

A detailed study of the first and second laws of thermodynamics and their 
consequences; the application of these laws to chemical systems. The develop- 
ment and use of the third law. Prerequisite, Chemistry 2, Mathematics 2 and 
either Chemistry 5 or Physics 2. No fee. 

12b. Advanced Physical Chemistry — Mr. Cadbury. 

Dipole moments, the parachor and spectra. Modern theories of solutions. Reac- 
tion kinetics. Photochemistry. Prerequisite, Chemistry 5, and Mathematics 2. 
No fee. 

13a. Advanced Organic Chemistry and Qualitative Organic Analysis — Mr. 

Jones. 

A study of stereochemistry, carbohydrates, proteins, amino adds, and special 
reactions. The identification of organic substances by classification reactions and 
by the preparation of derivatives constitutes the laboratory work. Prerequisite, 
Chemistry 4. A fee of $6.00 per semester is charged. 

14b. Organic Syntheses — Mr. Jones. 

A study of organo-metallic compounds, rearrangements, unsaturated systems, 
and special preparative reactions of organic chemistry. Prerequisite, Chemistry 4. 
A fee of $7.50 per semester is charged. 

15a. Advanced Quantitative Analysis — Mr. Meldrum. 

A systematic study of methods for the quantitative determination of the ele- 
ments. The laboratory work includes the Carius method for halogen, the deter- 
mination of carbon and hydrogen by combustion, the analysis of fuel gas, and elec- 
trolytic analysis. Prerequisite, Chemistry 3. A fee of $6.00 per semester is charged. 

17a, 18b. Chemistry Research — Mr. Meujrum, Mr. Cadbury, and Mr. Jones. 

Open only to Senior chemistry majors and graduate students in chemistry. May 
be elected as one or more courses. No fixed fee. 

21a, 22b. Special Topics in Theoretical Chemistry — Mr. Meldrum. 
Open only to graduate students. No fee. 
Chemistry 1&, Ab, and 17a were given in the summer of 1944. 



62 Haverford College 

ECONOMICS 

The instruction in Economics is intended primarily to give stu- 
dents an understanding of the working of modern economic society. 
The advanced courses are designed to give a liberal education and 
to arouse an informed interest in public affairs, as well as to meet 
the needs of men going into business or finance, or going on to grad- 
uate work in economics or business administration. Several of the 
advanced courses are designed to be of special value to men planning 
to enter the foreign service or other fields of government work, or 
going into journalism or law. A number of the courses acquaint the 
student with significant source material, and with research methods 
in economics, and give practice in the preparation of analyses and 
reports. 

Men majoring in Economics should take supporting work in the 
fields of Government, History, and Sociology, and are encouraged to 
take Introduction to Statistics, offered by the Department of Mathe- 
matics. Mathematics I is a prerequisite to Statistics. 

Economics 1 is elective for Sophomores and is a prerequisite to all 
other courses in Economics. It may be taken by Freshmen on the 
recommendation of the Dean, and by Juniors and Seniors with the 
permission of the professor in charge. 

Major Requirements 

Economics 1, 3a, 9a, 13a, and three other half-year courses in Economics. 
Mathematics 13b (Introduction to Statistics) may be considered as one such half- 
year course. 

Sociology la, and three other half-year courses in supporting fields, as approved 
by the professors concerned. 

Selected readings on the history of economic thought and on current economic 
problems. 

A seven-hour comprehensive examination covering a review of the major courses 
and the readings. A part of the comprehensive examination may be oral. 

1. Elementary Economics — Mr. Teaf. 

The purpose of this course is to acquaint the student with the main features of 
modern economic life, and to develop an understanding of the principles under- 
lying economic relationships. Emphasis is laid on the application of these prin- 
ciples to present day problems. 

3a. Money and Banking — Mr. Fetter. 

A study of the history and principles of money, credit, and banking, with par- 
ticular reference to American conditions. Such problems as monetary standards, 
price movements and their effects, foreign exchange, commercial banking, and 
central banking and the Federal Reserve System are considered. 

4b. International Trade and Finance — Mr. Fetter. 

A study of foreign trade and exchange, international payments and trade prob- 
lems connected therewith, money and banking in their international aspects, and 
international indebtedness. 



Courses of Instruction 63 

5a. Industry and Society — Mr. Watson. 
See Sociology 5a. 

6b. Labor Policies and Business Management — Mr. Watson. 
See Sociology 6b. 

8b. Government Finance — Mr. Herndon. 
See Government 8b. 

9a. Accounting — Mr. Teaf. 

The balance sheet and statement of profit and loss, the classification of accounts, 
the theory of debit and credit, the books of original entry and of record, opening 
and closing the books, corporation accounts, reserves, etc. Discussion is accom- 
panied by practice problems. This course is intended to provide an understanding 
of accounting sufficient for students going into the professions as well as a founda- 
tion for advanced accounting courses for those who will go into business. 

10b. The Corporation — Mr. Teaf. 

Economic functions and legal responsibilities of the corporation and its mem- 
bers; fixed capital, and the analysis of financial statements; policies involving 
surplus, reserves, dividends, etc.; expansion, combination, and reorganization. 
Social problems created by the growth of corporations are given special attention. 
Prerequisite, Economics 9a. 

11a. Government and Business — Mr. Teaf. 

A study of the historical development, economic basis, and the present problems 
of the regulation of business organization and policies by government. Special 
attention is given to such topics as the trust movement, anti-trust legislation, the 
Federal Trade Commission, competitive practices, cartels and trade associations. 

Also called Government 11a. 

13a. National Income and Investment — Mr. Fetter. 

A study of the meaning of national income and the methods of measuring it; 
its distribution in the United States; the economic effects of the allocation of 
national income as between consumption, investment, and hoarding; the signifi- 
cance of investment in the modern economy; the effects of governmental policy 
upon income distribution. 

Enrollment limited. A seminar course intended primarily for economics majors, 
but also open to qualified students from other departments. 

14b. Seminar in Economic Problems — Mr. Fetter. 

This seminar will deal with an economic problem of current importance, with 
emphasis on the relation between economic analysis and the formulation of 
public policy. 

The subject of the course may shift from year to year, or the same topic may be 
continued for several years, depending on developments in world economic affairs. 
In case of a shift in the subject matter of the course, it may be repeated for credit. 

15a, 16b. Seminar — MR. Fetter and Mr. Teaf. 

Readings, reports, and conferences on selected topics, to meet the individual 
needs of graduate students. Advanced undergraduate students may enroll for this 
course after specific arrangement with the chairman of the department. 

Economics 17a. Readings in Foreign Economics — Mr. Fetter. 

This course is to train men in the reading of economic literature in foreign 
languages, and to familiarize them with current economic publications and with 
the principal economic journals and sources of commercial and statistical infor- 
mation appearing in foreign languages. Intended primarily for economics majors, 
but qualified men in other fields will be admitted. 



64 Haverford College 

The course will be given as demand warrants, with reading in French, German, 
or Spanish to meet the needs of individual students. Men admitted to the course 
ordinarily must have the equivalent of two years of college study in the language 
to be covered, but by special permission a man with only one year may be admitted. 

ENGINEERING 

The engineering courses are designed to give a thorough training 
in fundamental engineering principles and, as far as practicable, to 
illustrate the application of these principles to their associated 
industries. 

Students not intending to enter the highly specialized fields of 
design and research will find the Haverford courses ample for their 
needs. Graduates of Haverford who have majored in engineering 
are admitted to the student-engineers' courses of the leading indus- 
trial companies on equal terms with graduates of the larger engineer- 
ing colleges. Those who desire more specialized training before 
entering the active work of the profession are granted substantial 
credit toward advanced standing in technical institutions or are 
admitted to their graduate schools. 

The engineering courses are conducted in the Hilles Laboratory 
of Applied Science, a modem building containing classrooms, draw- 
ing rooms, a departmental library, mechanical, electrical, and elec- 
tronics laboratories. 

Exceptional facilities for observing the practical side of the work 
are offered by the many manvifacturing companies in and near Phila- 
delphia, and frequent inspection trips are made. 

A typical selection of courses for those majoring in engineering 
is outlined on page 51. 

The specific courses offered by the department are described below; 
but, in addition, others may be arranged to cover special needs. 
Application for admission to such courses should be made to the 
professor in charge. Engineering 13a, 14b and 23a, 24b may be 
counted as courses in Physics for the purpose of satisfying any cur- 
riculum requirements. 

Major Requirements 

Engineering la, 2b, 7a, 8b, 13a, 14b, 15a, 16b. 

Chemistry 1 or its equivalent. Mathematics 2, Physics 2 and two additional 
half-year courses from Engineering, Mathematics, Physics or Chemistry. 
An active interest in current professional work. 
Engineering seminar and comprehensive examination. 

la. Principles of Engineering Drawing and Shop Methods — MR- Hetzel, 
Mr. Holmes and Mr. Rantz. 

Lettering, conventions, projection, perspective, sketching, detail and assembly 
drawings, checking, and blue printing. Text: French, Engineering Drawing, and 



Courses of Instruction 65 

French and McCuUy, Engineering Drawing Sheets. Woodworking, pattern and 
foundry work in shop. Inspection trips. A fee of $11.00 per semester is charged. 

2b. Engineering Drawing, Orientation, Surveying and Shop Methods — MR- 

Holmes, Mr. Hetzel and Mr. Rantz. 

Additional work on detail and assembly drawings for a complete machine. 
Exercises in machine-tool work, in plane surveying and in the mechanical labora- 
tory. Lectures will be arranged by outside specialists in the various branches of 
engineering for orientation purposes. Attendance at these lectures will be required. 
Discussions and reports. Inspection trips. A fee of $11.00 per semester is charged. 

5a. Shop Methods — Mr. Rantz. 

Machine-tool work on the lathe, planer, milling machine, shaper, etc. Reference 
reading and reports on modern production methods, costs and time studies. A fee 
of $12.50 per semester is charged. 

7a. Kinematics of Machines — Mr. Hetzel. 

Velocity and acceleration analysis of mechanisms; cams, belts and chains, gears, 
etc. Occasional inspection trips. Text: Keown and Faires, Mechanism, and 
Headley, Problems in Kinematics. A fee of $5.00 per semester is charged. 

8b. Analytical Mechanics — Mr. Hetzel. 

A study of forces and moments of forces; determination of forces in trusses and 
cranes; centroids and center of gravity; rectilinear and curvilinear motion; trans- 
lation and rotation of bodies; work, power, and energy; impulse and momentum; 
balancing and moments of inertia. Prerequisite or parallel course, Mathematics 2. 
No fee. 

10b. Materials of Engineering — Mr. Holmes. 

A study of the production and engineering properties of metals, their alloys and 
the more important non-metallic materials. Laboratory exercises on the testing 
machine, heat treatment, microscopic study of metals, hardness testing, etc. Text: 
Mills, Materials of Construction. Inspection trips. A fee of $7.50 per semester 
is charged. 

11a. Fluid Mechanics — Mr. Holmes. 

The properties of fluids; statics and dynamics of compressible and incompressible 
fluids; accelerated liquids in relative equilibrium; Reynolds' number; Bernoulli's 
theorem; flow of fluids in pipes, orifices and nozzles; flow with a free surface in 
channels and weirs; impulse and momentum in fluids; resistance of immersed 
and floating bodies; cavitation and dynamic similitude. A fee of $5.00 per semester 
is charged. 

12b. Thermodynamics — Mr. Holmes. 

Energy, gas laws, vapors, mixtures of gases and vapors, flow of fluids, theoretical 
and actual thermodynamic cycles for power and refrigeration. No fee. 

13a. Elements of Applied Electricity. 

This course, while fundamental to the more advanced electrical courses, is 
adapted to the needs of those students desiring practical experience with the 
common applications of electricity. It includes a study of circuits, d.c. and a.c. 
generators and motors, lamps, heaters, etc. The instruction is carried on by text- 
book and laboratory work. Text: Cook, Elements of Electrical Engineering. A fee 
of $7.50 per semester is charged. 

14b. Alternating Current Tlieory and Practice. 

A continuation of course 13a, with a more detailed study of alternating currents 
including power, electronics and communication apparatus. A fee of $7.50 per 
semester is charged. 



66 Haverford College 

15a. Heat Engineering — Four hours. Mr. Holmes. 

This course includes a study of steam and gas engines, turbines, condensers, 
air-compressors, steam boilers, power-plant economies, and cost ot power. Text: 
Severns and Degler, Steam, Air and Gas Power. 

One laboratory period a week is required. The laboratory' exercises parallel the 
classroom work and include boiler and engine testing, fuel tests, gas analysis, 
calibration of instruments, etc. Comprehensive reports for each test are required. 
Inspection trip. A fee of $7.50 per semester is charged. 

16b. Strength of Materials — Mr. Holmes. 

A study of stress and strain; of beams and columns; of shafting; of girders, 
trusses, combined stresses, etc. A series of tests on the screw testing-machine is 
made by each student. Text: Laurson and Cox, Mechanics of Materials. Inspection 
trips. Prerequisite, Engineering 8b. A fee of §7.50 per semester is charged. 

17a. Electronics — MR. Benham. 

Lectures, problems, and laboratory work covering fundamental principles, vac- 
uum and gas tubes, photo-electric devices, etc. See Physics 15a. 

18b. Internal Combustion Engines — Mr. Hetzel. 

A course on gasoline and Diesel engines, with particular attention to thermo- 
dynamics and the subject of fuels. Special topics may be arranged according to 
the interests of the group. Lectures, assigned reading, problems, laboratory- experi- 
ments, inspection trips. No fixed fee. 

21a, 22b. Mechanical Laboratory — Mr. Holmes and Mr. Hetzel. 

Operation, testing, and theory of steam, gas, hydraulic, and air machinery. 
Two periods of experimental work per week with reports on each test. If taken 
as 21a, the course may be continued through the second half-year by arrangement. 
Prerequisite, Engineering 15a. Assigned reading and comprehensive reports. A fee 
of $7.50 per semester is charged. 

23a. Electrical Circuits and Measurements. 

Circuit theory and laboratory work covering magnetic, inducti\e, capacitive and 
polyphase circuits; transients, non-sinusoidal voltages and currents. Text: Wein- 
bach, Alternating Current Circuits. A fee of §7.50 per semester is charged. 

24b. Electrical Theory and Experimentation. 

Special topics in electronics, communications and power. This course will be 
suited to the needs of a limited number of students electing it. Prerequisite, 
Engineering 14b or 17a. 

25a, 26b. Special Projects in Engineering. 

Students majoring in Engineering are encouraged to do individual work in spe- 
cial fields of investigation. Each student devotes the time equivalent to one or two 
semester courses in comprehensive reading or experimental work and reports on 
some particular topic. No fixed fee. 

27a, 28b. Machine Design. 

A study of the design of machine elements followed by a comprehensive design 
project in which a complete machine will be designed and detail working draw- 
ings made. Open to Senior engineering majors. Text: Faires, Design of Machine 
Elements. No fixed fee. 



Courses of Instruction 67 

ENGUSH LANGUAGE AND UTERATURE 

The department believes it essential to insure that all undergrad- 
uates should be able to use the English language efficiently in their 
college courses, regardless of the nature of those courses. Freshmen, 
therefore, are required to prove their ability in this respect. 

It believes further that the departmental curriculum must provide 
a general cultural background for those students whose interests are 
chiefly scientific or technical. It ofiEers, therefore, intermediate courses 
in English and American literature. 

It believes, finally, that courses must be provided for students who 
intend to do graduate work in literature or related fields. It offers, 
therefore, advanced courses designed both in content and method to 
train students with serious special interests. 

The department recognizes that these intentions cannot be rigidly 
differentiated, and there is no intention that they should be. Consid- 
erable freedom of selection is possible for the individual student after 
appropriate consultation. 

Major Requirements 

An individual program equal to six courses of two terms each, made up princi- 
pally from the advanced English courses with the approval of the Major Super- 
visor, and stressing the Elizabethan and nineteenth-century literature. 

la. Methods and Techniques of College Work — MR. Gibb and Mr. Sargent 
or Mr. Snyder. 

2b. Types of English Literature — Mr. Sargent or Mr. Snyder. 
An analysis of drama, poetry, fiction and expository prose. 

3a. Advanced Freshman English — Mr. Gibb. [Incorporated into English 4b, 

1943-1944.] 

Elective for those Freshmen who satisfy the instructor and the administration of 
their eligibility for advanced work. Limited to eight. 

4b. Intermediate Composition — MR- Gibb. 

A practical course in exposition and argumentation, ^sTitten and oral, for 
Seniors, Juniors, Sophomores and Freshmen. Individual conferences to promote 
clear and logical presentation of difficult material. Limited to twelve. Apply in 
advance. 

8b. The English Bible — Mr. Fught. 
(See Biblical Literature 8b.) 

lib. Shakespeare — Mr. Sargent. 

Reading and study of twelve plays with emphasis on features of general and 
popular interest. Not restricted, but offered primarily for Sophomores. 



68 Haverford College 

12a. Contemporary Drama — Mr. Snyder. 

A study of the technique and practice of the modern drama, as illustrated in 
the works of Ibsen and the best modern dramatists of England and America. 
Not restricted, but offered primarily for Sophomores. 

14b. American Literature to the Civil War — Mr. Snyder. 

21b. Nineteenth-Century Prose Writers. 

A reading course with conferences and occasional lectures on novelists from 
Austen to Hardy and essayists from Lamb to Morris. 

22b. Nineteenth-Century Poets — Mr. Snyder. 

A study of six poets: Coleridge, Wordsworth, Shelley, Byron, Keats, and Tenny- 
son. Lectures and classroom discussions. 

23a. Elizabethan Literature — Mr. Sargent. 

Chief writers of the English Renaissance, omitting Shakespeare. Verse, prose and 
drama. Prerequisite, English lib. 

26b. Eighteenth-Century Literature — Mr. Snyder. 
The age of Johnson. 

27a. Greek Literature in English — Mr. Post. 
(See Greek 27a.) 

28b. Creative Writing — Mr. Sargent. 

Practice in writing imaginative literature. Chiefly confined to prose fiction. 
Regular assignments, class discussion and personal conferences. Limited to twelve 
Juniors and Seniors. 

30b. Chaucer — Mr. Sargent. 

Some introduction to the study of Middle English, but main emphasis upon 
analysis of the literary qualities of Troilus and Criseyde and The Canterbury Tales. 

32b. Contemporary English and American Literature — Mr. Sargent. 

Selected twentieth-century writers, from Conrad and Crane to the present. 
Fiction, verse and criticism. Emphasis on development and treatment of literary 
problems in this period. Prerequisite, two half-courses in English beyond the 
Freshman year. 

34b. Public Discussion and Dramatic Presentation — Mr. Gibb. 

Practice in public speaking for such purposes as debating, forum discussions, 
dramatic performances, and radio broadcasting. 

42b. Special Topics in Poetry — Mr. Snyder. 

Important treatises on poetics from Aristotle to \Vhitman. An intensive study 
of Browning's poems. Limited to twelve. Required of all English Majors. Apply 
in advance. 

43a. Methods of Literary Scholarship — Mr. Sargent. 

A study of the aims, problems and methods of research in English literature by 
means of a survey of types of Shakespearean scholarship. Bi-weekly reports, and 
one piece of original investigation. Required of all English Majors. Apply in 
advance. Limited to twelve. 

English la, 27a, and 32b were offered in the summer of 1944. 



Courses of Instruction 69 

GEOGRAPHY AND GEOLOGY 

1. Geography and Ceology — Mr. Dunn. 

A discussion of the general principles of these sciences, with special reference to 
North America, and to the Philadelphia region. Practical work in mineralogy, 
physiography, and stratigraphy is required. Three lectures a week (one omitted 
at option of instructor) . Open to Juniors and Seniors without prerequisite. 

2. Climate, Weather, and Terrain — Mr. Dunn. 

GERMAN 

German 1, 2, 3, and 9a [106] are primarily language courses. The 
remaining courses are devoted primarily to the history of German 
literature, or to the intensive study of special periods or authors. 
The courses in literature are open to Juniors and Seniors, and to 
especially well qualified Sophomores. 

Opportunity is given to students who complete German 1 or Ger- 
man 2 with distinction to advance rapidly into higher courses by 
passing a special examination on a prescribed program of collateral 
reading. 

Major Requirements 

German 3, 5a, 6b, 9a [10b], 11a, 12b, 13a, 14b, 15a. 

Supporting courses to be arranged in conference with Mr. Kelly. 

A comprehensive examination covering: 1. The German language; 2. History 
of the German language; 3. German literature; 4. German history, 1517-1914; and 
5. A special period, literary movement, or author. 

1. Elementary German* — Mr. Kelly and Mr. Pfund. 
Grammar, conversation, and the reading of simple texts. 

2. Intermediate German* — Mr. Kelly and Mr. Pfund. 

Texts of moderate diflBculty are read both in class and as outside work. One hour 
a week is devoted to composition. German is the language of the classroom. 
Scientific German may be chosen as collateral reading. 

3. Advanced German — Mr. Pfund. 

Reading of standard works of German literature. Composition and Conversa- 
tion. The collateral reading may be done in literary or scientific German. 
Prerequisite, German 2 or the equivalent in school. 

5a. Tlie Beginnings of Modern German Literature — A study of Lessing and 
the early works of Goethe and Schiller. Hours to be arranged, first half-year. 
Mr. Kelly. 

Prerequisite, German 3. 

6b. The Classical Period of German Literature — A study of the mature works 
of Goethe and Schiller. Hours to be arranged, second half-year. Mr. Kelly. 
Prerequisite, German 5a 

* These courses meet four times per week. Three hours credit. 



70 Haverford College 

7a. Advanced German — Mr. Kelly. 
Reading in German literature. 

9a or 10b. Advanced Composition and Conversation — Mr. Pfund. 

Prerequisite, German 3 or the equivalent. 

11a. History of German Literature from its Origins to the Seventeenth 
Century — Mr. Pfund. 

Lectures in German, with collateral reading in modern German translation. 
Discussions. Written and oral reports. 
Prerequisite, German 3. 

12b. History of German Literatiu*e from the Seventeenth Century to the 
Present — Mr. Pfund. 

A survey course with lectures in German. Collateral reading. Discussions. 
Written and oral reports. 
Prerequisite, German 3. 

13a. German Romanticism — Mr. Kelly. 

A study of the Romantic movement in Germany and its relations to similar 
movements in England and France. 
Prerequisite, German 3. 

14b. The German Drama of the Nineteenth Century — Mr. Kelly. 

15a. Faust — Mr. Pfund. 

An intensive study of Goethe's Faust in the original. Consideration is given to 
kindred works in European literature. 

17a. The Life and Works of Richard Wagner — Mr. Kelly. 
18b. German Lyric Poetry — Mr. Pfund. 

1 R & R. Elementary German — See Reconstruction and Relief. 
German 1, 2a, and 3a were offered in the summer of 1944. 

GOVERNMENT 

Courses in Government are designed with three purposes: to pro- 
vide an understanding of the philosophy behind and the evolution 
of political ideas; to study contemporary forms and processes of local, 
state, national, and international government; to provide training 
for students entering public service, journalism, or the law. 

Major Requirements 

Government 3a, 4b, 17a, and 18b. 

Any four other courses of one term each in Government. 
Any four other courses of one term each in any of the social sciences. 
A three-hour examination in political philosophy. 

A four-hour examination in other courses taken in the Department of Govern- 
ment. 



Courses of Instruction 71 

2b. Government and Economic Resources. 

A study of the basic geographical factors which have influenced political policies, 
governmental institutions, and economic adjustments. 

3a. American Federal Government — MR- Herndon. 

A study of the origin and structure of the American Federal governmental 
system. 

This course is intended primarily for Freshmen and Sophomores, and is a pre- 
requisite for advanced courses in this department. 

4b. American Public Administration — Mr. Herndon. 

A study of the functioning of the American Federal governmental system, 
including its participation in the program of the United Nations. 

5a. Contemporary Legislation — Mr. Herndon. 

A study of the technique of legislation and an analysis of certain selected bills 
currently before Congress. 

8b. Government Finance — Mr. Herndon. 

A study of the general principles of public revenues, public expenditures, public 
indebtedness, fiscal administration, and of the principles of equity in the distri- 
bution of tax burdens. Prerequisite, Government 3a or Economics I. 

Also called Economics 8&. 

9a. Constitutional Law — Mr. Herndon. 

A study of the principles of constitutional interpretation and of the leading 
decisions of the Supreme Court. This course also includes readings in selected 
works on constitutional development and lectures on the essentials of jurisprudence. 

10b. State and Local Government — Mr. Herndon. 

A study of the structure and administration of state and local government, with 
special reference to: Pennsylvania; Montgomery, Delaware, and Philadelphia 
Counties; Haverford and Lower Merion Townships. 

11a. Government and Business — Mr. Teaf. 

See Economics 11a. 

13a. American Foreign Policy — Mr. Herndon. 

A study of the basic foreign policies which have evolved in the experience of the 
United States, and the adaptations which have been found necessary in recent 
times. 

15a. The World's Political, Economic, and Social Problems and Their EKs- 
torical Background — Mr. Stinnes. 

A lecture and seminar course on the more significant political, economic, and 
social problems growing out of the Reformation and the American and French 
Revolutions, and on the problems of Asia and Latin America. 

17a, 18b. The Development of Political Thought — Mr. Morley, assisted by 
Messrs. Foss, Herndon, Post, Steere, and Stinnes. 
See Philosophy 17a, 18b. 

19a. Planning for the Post- War World — Mr. Stinnes. 

A seminar course based upon study of problems arising as the aftermath of war 
(full employment, community planning, inter-racial relations, etc.) and interna- 
tional relations (world organization, spheres of influence, trade policies, economic 
unification of Europe, long term trends of Russian politics, and the rise of 
Asiatic nationalism) . 



72 Haverford College 

21a. Political, Economic, and Social Problems of Latin America and Their 
Historical Background — Mr. Stinnes. 
A lecture and seminar course, with special emphasis on Argentina and Brazil. 

22b. Political, Economic, and Social Problems of Europe and Their His- 
torical Background — MR. Stinnes. 

A lecture and seminar course, with special emphasis on Germany, Czechoslo- 
vakia, Austria, and Poland, and the historic forces making for unity and disunity 
on the Continent. 

Students interested in taking certain courses offered by the Faculty in Politics 
of Bryn Mawr College should consult Mr. Herndon. 

Government 4b was offered in the summer of 1944. 

GREEK 

Instruction in Greek aims to familiarize the student with the 
thought and culture of ancient Greece. Greek language is important 
for its relations to other European languages and for its effect on 
modern scientific terminology, particularly in medicine. 

Greek literature and thought continue to be an important force 
in the modern world; in connection with their study the recurring 
principles of behavior, statecraft, philosophy, and drama are stressed. 

Major Requirements 

Greek 3, and four half-year courses from Greek 7a, 8b, 9a, 10b, 11a, 12b, 27a, 
and History 13a. 

Three additional courses to be arranged in conference with Mr. Post. 

If Greek 3 is not taken in college, an additional half-course will be required. 

A comprehensive examination on Greek language and literature, Greek history 
and Greek civilization. 

1. Elementary Greek — Mr. Post. 

Thorough study of the elements of the language follo^ved by the reading of 
simple Attic prose. This course should be taken in Freshman year, if possible. 

2. Intermediate Greek — Mr. Post. 

A rapid reading course in such authors as Homer, Herodotus, and Euripides. 

3a, 4b. Advanced Intermediate Greek — MR. Post. 
Selections from Plato, Menander, Aristophanes, and the tragedians are read. 

7a, 8b. Advanced Greek — Mr. Post. 

The instructor will arrange with students electing this course for systematic 
study of special subjects in Greek philosophy, history, or literature in connection 
with the reading of Greek authors. 

9a, 10b. Advanced Greek — Mr. Post. 

A continuation of the work done in Greek 7a, 8b. 

11a, 12b. Advanced Greek Prose Composition — Mr. Post. 
This course should be taken by all candidates for final honors in Greek. 

27a. Greek Literature in English — Mr. Post. 

Lectures on Greek literature. Reading of Greek poetry, drama, and literary 
criticism in translation. Essays and discussions. No knowledge of Greek is required 
in this course, but a general acquaintance with English literature is essential. 
Also called English 27a. 



Courses of Instruction 73 

fflSTORY 

The study of History provides a background against which many 
current problems may be viewed to advantage, and it helps to develop 
critical standards for the evaluation of evidence. It is further impor- 
tant as a foundation for professional studies in fields such as public 
administration, journalism and the law. 

Major Requirements 

Four full-year courses (or three full-year courses and two half-year courses) in 
History, other than History 1 and 8a. 
Two full-year courses or their equivalent in related departments. 
Four review examinations of three hours each. 

1. English History — Mr. Lunt. 

A survey of political, constitutional, economic, and social history, intended as 
an introductory course. 

2. Foundations of the United States, 1492-1865 — Mr. Drake. 

Lectures, reading, and discussion in American colonial and early national his- 
tory. Elective for undergraduates who have been in residence two terms. 

3. National Development of the United States, 1865 to the Present — Mr. 

Dr.'VKE. 

A study of institutional growth, with the larger social and political issues of 
the present considered in their historical setting. A lecture, reading, and discus- 
sion course. Elective for undergraduates who have been in residence two terms. 

4. English Constitutional History — Mr. Lunt. 

A study of the formation and growth of English institutions, designed to be 
useful particularly to those who are interested in government and law. Elective 
for undergraduates who have been in residence two terms. 

5. Mediaeval History — Mr. Lunt. 

A survey of the history of Europe from the time of the barbarian invasions to 
about 1500. Elective for undergraduates ^vho have been in residence two terms. 

6. Modem European History — MR. Lunt. 

A survey of the history of Europe from about 1500 to the present. Elective for 
undergraduates who have been in residence two terms. 

8b. Ancient History of the Near East — MR- Flight. (.\1so called Biblical 
Literature 5a.) 
Elective for undergraduates who have been in residence two terms. 

13a. Greek History — Mr. H. Comfort. 

A survey of Greek history, with frequent reports on the art, archaeology, and 
political institutions of Greece. A knowledge of Greek is not required. 
Elective for undergraduates who have been in residence two terms. 

14b. Roman History — Mr. H. Comfort. 

I A sur\'ey of Roman history to the time of Constantine. Frequent class reports 

I on special topics. A knowledge of Latin is not required. 

! Elective for undergraduates who have been in residence two terms. 



74 Haverford College 

HUMANISTIC STUDIES 

la, 2b. Mr. Post. 

This course is designed to introduce students to the life and literature of the 
Far East through the use of translations and to develop their mastery of a major 
field and of expository writing. G. Nye Steiger, A History of the Far East, is recom- 
mended for supplementary reading. Essays weekly or biweekly for discussion at 
individual meetings with the instructor. It may be taken as one or two half-courses 
in either half-year by a limited number of students who will be admitted only 
after a personal interview and only if there is still room for them when they apply 
to the instructor. 

LATIN 

The courses in Latin supplement the intensive foundation work 
of the secondary school by means of more extensive reading over a 
wider range of literature, illustrating successive eras of culture from 
the third century B.C. to the sixteenth century A.D. By inculcating 
a fuller knowledge of the Latin language as a tool, the same courses 
open the door to a better command of English, Romance languages, 
philosophy, and history. 

Major Requirements 

Four full-year courses in Latin (not including 1, 3, 5a, and 6b) . 

Two such additional full-year courses in other departments as are arranged in 
conference between the student and the professors in charge. 

A comprehensive written examination on Roman history, literature, and civiliza- 
tion, and the classical heritage of medieval and modern times. Candidates for 
honors must also take an oral examination. 

1. Elementary Latin — Mr. H. Comfort. 
Grammar, reading, composition. Prepares students for Latin 3. 

3. Cicero — Mr. Lockwood. 

Orations of Cicero and readings in other prose authors. 

5a, 6b. Vergil — Mr. H. Comfort. 
Six books of Vergil's Aeneid and readings in other Roman poets. 

7. Survey of Classical Roman Literature — Mr. Lockwood. 

Rapid reading of classical authors from Plautus to Suetonius. Emphasis w^ill 
be laid on literary history and appreciation. Text: Lockwood, A Survey of Classical 
Roman Literature. 

Any of the following higher courses may he repeated, with change of content, for 
full credit. 

9a, 10b. Readings in Latin Literature — Mr. Lockwood and Mr. H. Comfort. 

Individual work. Each student may select a field of %vriting which is correlated 
with his other college courses (e.g.. in philosophy, history, Romance languages, or 
English literature) or he may pursue more intensive ^vork in one of the periods or 
one of the literary types surveyed in Latin 7 or II. 



Courses of Instruction 75 

11. Sur\eT of Medieval Latin Literature — MR. Lockwood. 

Rapid reading of selections from the post-classical, Christian, and medieval 
Latin ^^Titers. Study of the phases of European civilization represented in Latin 
literature. 

13a, 14b. Advanced Prose Composition — Mr. Lockwood. 
Either 13a or 14b is required of candidates for Final Honors. 

17. Roman Law — Mr. Lockwood. 

Reading of selections from the Institutes^ the Digest, and other texts and sources 
of Roman Law. 



MATHEMATICS 

Freshman mathematics is designed to provide that background of 
trigonometry, algebra and analvtic sreometrv which is necessarv for 
any serious student of the physical or social sciences and which is 
culturally desirable for many others. 

The more advanced courses are arranged to meet the needs of two 
groups in addition to those majoring in mathematics: 

(1) Students of Chemistrv, Physics, and Engineering, who should 
take Mathematics 2 and in many cases Mathematics 3 and Mathe- 
matics 11a. 

(2) Students, such as economists and biologists, who need statis- 
tics in their major fields and who should take Mathematics 13a 
and 14b. 

The department major prepares for teaching in preparatory 
schools, for graduate study leading to college teaching, and for sta- 
tistical and actuarial work. 

Major Requirements 

Mathematics 1, 2, 3, 7a, 8b, 9a, 10b, 11a, and 16b. 

Prescribed parallel reading on the history and general principles of Mathematics. 

Three written comprehensive examinations, each three hours in length. .\n oral 
examination will be required of candidates for final honors. 

It is recommended that fadlitv in reading French and German be acquired as 
early in the college course as possible. 

1. Freshman Mathematics — Four hours. Mr. Oakley and Mr. Holmes. 

First semester — Plane Trigonometry, including logarithms and the solution of 
triangles. Topics in College Algebra, including complex numbers, combinations 
and permutations, determinants, and the elements of the theory of equations. 

Second semester — Analytic Geometry. General methods in the plane with appli- 
cations to conic sections and other curves. Introduction to the geometrv of three 
dimensions. 

Freshmen with superior preparation are invited to discuss with the department 
the possibility of their taking Mathematics la, 9b, or in rare cases Mathematics 2, 
in place of Mathematics 1. 



76 Haverford College 

2. Calculus — Mr. Oakley. 

Differential and Integral Calculus, with applications. Prerequisite, Mathe- 
matics 1. Specially well qualified Freshmen may elect this course with the per- 
mission of the department. 

3. Advanced Calculus and Differential Equations — Mr. Oakley. 

Prerequisite, Mathematics 2. 

7a. Theory of Equations — Mr. Oakley. 

Advanced theory of equations, determinants, matrices. Open to specially well 
qualified freshmen in place of mathematics la. Otherwise, Prerequisite, Mathe- 
matics la. 

8a. Advanced Algebra — Mr. Oakley. 

Introduction to number theory and modern abstract algebra. Prerequisites, 
Mathematics 2, la. 

[Offered on request to majors only.] 

9b. Plane and Solid Analytic Geometry — Mr. Allendoerfer. 

Review of plane analytic geometry followed by solid analytic geometry. Open 
to freshmen with a knowledge of analytic geometry in place of Mathematics lb. 
Otherwise, Prerequisite, Mathematics lb. 

10b. Introduction to Higher Geometry — Mr. Allendoerfer. 

Projective geometry from the synthetic and the analytic points of view. Klein's 
theory of general geometries including the standard non-Euclidean cases. Pre- 
requisites, Mathematics 2, 9b. 

[Offered on request to majors only.] 

11a. Partial Differential Equations and Fourier Series — Mr. Green. 

Problem course, with many applications to Chemistry, Engineering and Physics. 
Prerequisite, Mathematics 3. 

13b. Introduction to Statistics — Mr. Oakley. 

Tabular and graphic methods, frequency distribution, averages, measures of 
central tendency, dispersion and skewness, correlation, tests of significance. Lectures 
and laboratory. Prerequisite, Mathematics 1. A fee of $5.00 per semester is charged. 

14a. Advanced Statistics, Elementary Probabilities and Finite Differences — 

Mr. Oakley. 

This course is designed for students who are interested in statistical and actuarial 
work. Prerequisite, Mathematics 2 and 13b. 

15a or 16b. Special Topics — Mr. Oakley, Mr. Allendoerfer, and Mr. Green. 
The content of this course may vary from year to year to suit the needs of 
advanced students. May be repeated for credit. 

19a. Mechanics — Mr. Sutton. 
See Physics 9a. 
Mathematics 1, 2, 13a were offered in the summer of 1944. 

MUSIC 

In addition to a considerable collection of musical scores and books 
in the general library, the special equipment of the Music Depart- 
ment consists of a collection of phonograph records, scores, and books 
presented in 1933 by the Carnegie Corporation and amplified by 



Courses of Instruction 77 

yearly accessions to double its original size (ca. 1600 records), sev- 
eral pianos, and a Hammond organ with a "Model E type" console. 

The new Music Room is open to students, army, and faculty at 
certain hours. It is used for music classes and, in preparation for 
them, for record playing and rehearsals. A series of informal con- 
certs will be held there on certain Sunday nights during 1944-45. 
Certain instruments, as well as a selected library of chamber music 
literature, will be made available for those desiring participation in 
ensemble playing. 

The Haverford College Glee Club holds its concerts on the campus 
and outside in cooperation with the Cap and Bells. Its membership 
is composed of civilian and army students. Rehearsals are held on 
Tuesday and Thursday evenings. Joint concerts are given with other 
institutions, for the sake of performing works for mixed voices. 
Musically endowed students will find ample opportunity to study the 
musical masterpieces at first hand, through singing and playing. 

A series of formal concerts in Roberts Hall, at which well-known 
soloists as well as outside choral and instrumental ensembles will be 
presented, will take place during the academic year 1944-45. 

Major Requirements 

Three full year courses in Music and three full year (or six half year) courses 
in related fields such as Art 2, 4, or 6b; German 17b; English 23; Physics 12b, or 
other courses in Music. These courses are to be arranged in conference with the 
professor in charge. 

A comprehensive examination in two parts: the History of Music, showing a 
general knowledge of the music of the Christian era and a special knowledge of 
one designated period (Gothic, Baroque, Classical, Romantic, or Modern) , and 
Musical Craftsmanship, showing aptitude in strict and free counterpoint and har- 
monic devices, as well as scoring for an orchestral ensemble. 

1. Introduction to Music History and Appreciation — Mr. Swan and Mr. 
Pepinsky. 

Intended for those students who have a general interest in music without as yet 
possessing the necessary criteria in approaching it, listening to it intelligently, and 
appraising it. Devoted to the study of the basic forms of musical art, an analysis 
of the modern orchestra, and the acquisition of a historical perspective. No 
prerequisites. 

2. The main periods of Music History from the Renaissance to the Nine- 
teenth Century. 

Music in the Nineteenth Century — Mr. Swan and Mr. Pepinsky. 

A study of the succession of styles in music (e.g., the Palestrina style, the Baroque, 
the Classical style of the Viennese masters, etc.) . Analysis of motets, madrigals, 
concerti, sonatas, and symphonies. The study of the Nineteenth Century includes 
the Romantic symphony, chamber and piano music, the opera from Rossini to 
Verdi, Wagner, and the Russians, the art song from Schubert to Wolf. Prerequisite, 
Music la or some previous acquaintance Avith music. 



78 Haverford College 

3. Musical Craftsmanship — Mr. Swan and Mr. Pepinsky. 

A beginners' course for those who want to be initiated into musical composition. 
After disposing of the rudiments of music (notation, clefs, intervals, etc.) , the 
student is taught the principles of melodic construction, and of writing in two 
parts melodically. Practice in the simpler contrapuntal, harmonic and rhythmic 
devices. Scoring for various instruments. No prerequisites. 

4. Instrumentation (in combination with the Departments of Physics and Psy- 
chology) — Mr. Pepinsky. 

A study of the orchestral instruments from the point of view of their tone-color 
and tone-production, their idiosyncrasies and limitations, and the effects of combi- 
nation in ensemble. An intimate study of the scores of master works will be made. 
A knowledge of harmony and performance on a musical instrument is prerequisite. 
Text: Forsythe, Orchestration, The Macmillan Co. 

PHILOSOPHY 

The courses in philosophy are intended to help men face and 
examine the great issues of life, to acquaint them with the major 
currents of reflection upon the nature of the universe, and to assist 
them in finding their own way to a more ordered and intelligent 
relation with their world. The work aims to acquaint the students 
with the great classical thinkers and movements of philosophy and 
to put them in touch with present day philosophical and political 
discussions. 

Major Requirements 

Psychology la; Philosophy 5, 7a. 

Four other half-year courses in Philosophy. 

Four half-year courses in related fields to be arranged in conference with the 
professor in charge. 

A comprehensive examination in two parts: three hours on the History of 
Philosophy and three hours on one optional field selected from Topics in Philos- 
ophy since 1800, or Religious Thought, or Psychology. 

3a. Introduction to Philosophy — Mr. Hepp. 

An understanding of the nature and function of philosophy and of its relations 
to other fundamental human interests such as science, religion, and art is sought 
through a consideration of representative philosophical problems. 

5. History of Philosophy — Mr. Foss and Mr. Steere. 

A study of the development of philosophy with special reference to Plato, 
Aristotle, Descartes, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, Spinoza, Leibnitz, Kant, and Hegel. 
First-hand acquaintance with selected writings of these philosophers, reports, lec- 
tures, and class discussions. Philosophy 3a is recommended but not required. 

7a. Ethics — Mr. Hepp and Mr. Steere. 

The course will study (1) conflicts of ethical values involved in contemporary 
life; (2) certain classical ethical devices for resolving those conflicts; (3) the role 
of the individual and of the group in the realization of ethical values. Case mate- 
rial drawn from contemporary situations and from literature will be widely used. 
Discussions, lectures and papers. 



Courses of Instruction 79 

9a. Qassics of Religious Literature — MR- Steere. 

A study which will include such books as Augustine, Confessions; Bernard of 
Clairvaux, On Consideration; Meister Eckhart, Sermons; Little Flowers of St. 
Francis of Assisi; Thomas ^ Kempis, Imitation of Christ; Theologica Germanica; 
Theresa of Avila, Autobiography; Frances de Sales, Introduction to the Devout 
Life; Lancelot Andrewes, Preces Privatae; Pascal, Thoughts; Isaac Penington, 
Letters; John Wesley, Journal; John Henry Newman, Apologia; George Tyrrell, 
Autobiography. 

10b. Nineteenth-Century Thinkers — Mr. Steere. 
Selected writings of Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, Tolstoy, and Bergson. 

11a. Logic — Mr. Hepp. 

The principles of valid inference and their application to reasoning in every-day 
life and in the sciences; the syllogism and other types of formal reasoning, the 
nature of proof, the detection of fallacies; introduction to the logic of scientific 
method and to contemporary developments in symbolic logic. 

12b. Philosophy of Science — Mr. Hepp. 

This course, designed for students with a general cultural interest as well as for 
those specializing in some one of the sciences, aims at an understanding of the 
nature of scientific knowledge, the logical methods of science, and the structure 
of scientific systems. The course will aid students of the special sciences in appre- 
ciating the manner in which the work of their own field expresses man's scientific 
interest and contributes to the scientific world-view. Basic concepts such as 
induction, causation, probability, measurement, explanation, prediction, and veri- 
fication are analyzed. 

15a. History and Philosophy of Quakerism — MR. W. \V. Comfort. 

The Quaker Movement is studied in its relation to other intellectual and 
religious movements of its time, particularly those found in English philosophy. 
The development of the dominant Quaker conceptions is traced to the present 
day and critically examined. The course is designed for non-Friends as well as for 
Friends. Not open to Freshmen. 

17a, 18b. The Development of Political Thought — Mr. Morley, assisted by 

Mr. Foss, Mr. Herndon, Mr. Post, Mr. Steere, and Mr. Stinnes. 

See Government 17a, 18b. 

A seminar course based upon the writings of selected political philosophers from 
Plato to the present day. 

21. Philosophical Seminar — Mr. Steere, Mr. Foss and Mr. Hepp. 

Specialized work in some restricted field of philosophic or religious thought is 
undertaken, the precise subject depending upon the needs of the students and tlie 
general interests of the group. Primarily designed for seniors majoring in philos- 
ophy and for graduates. 

Philosophy la (Elementary Psychology) and 6b (Main Problems of Philosophy) 
were offered in the summer of 1944. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

The college equipment for outdoor athletics includes: Walton 
Field, for football and track and field sports, with a 440-yard oval 
and a 220-yard, eight-lane straightway cinder track; the Class of 1888 
and Merion Fields for Association (soccer) football, both of which 



80 Haverford College 

are used for baseball in the spring; a skating pond; Cope Field for 
cricket; an athletic field, presented by the Class of 1916; a baseball 
field, presented by the Class of 1922 and used also for soccer in the 
fall, and twelve tennis courts, five of which were presented by the 
Class of 1923. 

The Gymnasium floor, sixty by ninety feet, is used for basketball 
and intramural sports. Adjoining the main floor are offices for the 
instructors, the administration of physical examinations, and for 
special student conferences. Adjoining the main hall is a large and 
comfortable lounging room. The basement contains dressing rooms, 
a number of well-ventilated lockers, shower baths, a pool, a wrestling 
room and storage room for athletic equipment. Through the courtesy 
of the Merion Cricket Club and the Merion Golf Club, facilities for 
squash are available. 

A thorough physical examination with a series of efficiency tests 
is given to each student upon entrance, and another at the end of 
Sophomore year. A Tuberculin Test is given to all Freshmen, fol- 
lowed by an X-ray if necessary, as part of this required examination. 
No student whose physical condition is unsatisfactory will be per- 
mitted to represent the College on any athletic team. 

Course 1 is required of Freshmen; Course 2, of Sophomores; 
Course 3, of Juniors. 

These courses are arranged in accordance with the plan for all- 
year physical training during Freshman and Sophomore years, and 
part-year physical training during Junior year. All accelerated sum- 
mer students must participate in some activity. For Physical Educa- 
tion 1 and 2 — a half course credit will be given. For Physical Edu- 
cation 3 — a pass or failure will be shown. 

Work on varsity and junior varsity squads may be substituted for 
regular Physical Education requirements. 

1. Physical Education — Three hours. Mr. Haddleton, Mr. Evans, Mr, 
Bra MALL, and Mr. Mullan. 

A course of elementary instruction in athletic games, including football, soccer, 
basketball, tennis, golf, track, volley ball, handball, badminton; partly elective. 
Special corrective exercises during the 2nd and 3rd quarters. 

2. Physical Education — Three hours. Mr. Haddleton, Mr. Evans, Mr. 
Bramall, and Mr. Mullan, 

A course of advanced instruction in athletic games with emphasis on intra- 
mural sports. 

3. Physical Education — Three hours. Mr. Haddleton, Mr. Evans, Mr. 
Bramall, and Mr. Mullan. 

A course almost entirely elective, involving participation in some organized and 
supervised athletic activity during two of the three athletic seasons of the 
college year. 



Courses of Instruction 81 

PHYSICS 

The introductory courses are Physics 1 and 2. The first of these 
covers elementary Physics a little more thoroughly than a secondary 
school course, but the laboratory work is designed especially for 
those who do not expect to specialize in physics. Physics 2 is the 
basic course for further work in physics, chemistry, or engineering. 
It covers the work required in physics for admission to many medi- 
cal schools. For the present Physics 1 also will be accepted as the 
required prerequisite for admission to the more advanced courses. 

Students intending to specialize in physics, chemistry, or medicine 
should also elect Physics 3. 

Physics 1, 2, 3 and 13 are offered annually. Other courses are 
offered according to demand. 

Major Requirements 

Physics 2, 13 and tuo courses of two terms each from Physics 3, 4b, 5a, 7a, 8b, 9a, 
10b, Ila, 12b, 15a, 16b 

History of Physics. 

Mathematics 3, and one or one and one-half courses from Chemistry 1 or 2, 
Engineering 13a, 14b, 23a, 24b, Astronomy la, 3a, 4b, or additional mathematics. 

A comprehensive examination based upon above-mentioned courses. 

1. Introductory Physics — Four hours. Mr. Benham. 

An elementary course designed for students who have had no previous study of 
physics, especially for those who may have no intention of specializing in science. 
Its purpose is to acquaint students with the principles underlying common physical 
phenomena and to illustrate, by lecture table experiments, solution of problems 
and simple laboratory experiments, how these principles apply to matters of 
everyday experience. This is a much less exacting course than Physics 2. Text: 
Black, An Introductory Course in College Physics. A fee of $7.50 per semester is 
charged. 

2. General Physics — Four hours. Mr. Sutton and Mr. Pepinsky. 

Mechanics, heat, sound, magnetism, electricity, and light are studied with the 
help of problems and lecture demonstrations. A feature of this course is the labora- 
tory work, the chief aim of which is accuracy of observation and measurement. 
Text: Mendenhall, Eve, Keys, and Sutton, College Physics. Prerequisites, Trigo- 
nometry, and Entrance Physics or Physics 1. A fee of $7.50 per semester is charged. 

3. Atomic Physics — Mr. SunoN. 

A large amount of reading supplementary to the lectures is required in the 
library of reference books. Experiments are performed by the class as a whole upon 
such subjects as: atomic and molecular dimensions, weight, and numbers; magni- 
tude of charge and ratio Eh-M for electrolytic ions; e-:-m for cathode rays; prop- 
erties of gaseous ions; measurement of the electronic charge e by Millikan's 
oil-drop method; current and space charge in an electron tube; photo-electric 
effect; radiation and ionization potentials; X-ray spectra; rate of decay of thorium 



82 Haverford College 

emanation, and of the active deposit from radon; counting the alpha particles 
from a specimen of polonium. Prerequisites, Physics 2. A fee of $7.50 per semester 
is charged. 

4b. Spectroscopy — Mr. Sutton. 

Lectures, readings, and experiments on spectroscopy and atomic structure giving 
emphasis upon the underlying theory and offering acquaintance with the labora- 
tory methods involved. A fee of $7.50 per semester is charged. 

5a. Transmission Systems — Mr. Benham. 

Lectures, class discussions and occasional experiments on the theory and prac- 
tice of networks. The course covers reduction and transformation of complex 
impedance and resistance networks, resonance in electrical circuits, transmission 
lines, filters, coupled circuits, equalizers, and bridge circuits. Text: W. L. Everitt, 
Communication Engineering. Prerequisites, Physics 2, Mathematics 2. Laboratory 
fee, $7.50 per semester. 

7a. Electricity and Magnetism — Mr. Benham. 

Lectures and laboratory experiments in precision electrical measurements. This 
course treats such topics as Kirchhoff's la^vs. Gauss's theorem, magnetic circuits, 
potential, capacity, inductance, alternating current, and the laws of the electro- 
magnetic field. Textbook: Page and Adams, Principles of Electricity, Prerequisites, 
Physics 2 and Mathematics 2. Fee, $7.50 per semester. 

8b. Intermediate Radio Communication — Mr. Benham. 

Lecture and laboratory course in high frequency transmission and reception. 
Textbook: Terman, Radio Engineering. Prerequisites, Physics 2 and Mathe- 
matics 2, and preferably Physics 7a. A fee of $7.50 per semester is charged. 

9a. Mechanics — Mr. Sutton. 

Analytical mechanics treating the statics, kinematics, and dynamics of particles 
and rigid bodies. Lectures and problems on the application of calculus and vector 
methods to mechanical systems including a brief treatment of Lagrange's equations 
and the special theory of relativity. Text: Synge and Griffith, Principles of 
Mechanics. Prerequisites: Physics 2 and Mathematics 5 (or Mathematics ) may 
be taken concurrently) . No fee. 

Also called Mathematics 19a. 

10b. Introduction to Mathematical Physics — Mr. Sutton. 

Lectures and problems on selected topics in mathematical physics, such as 
hydrodynamics, thermodynamics, kinetic theory, wave motion, theory of electric 
fields, etc. Textbook: Page, Introduction to Theoretical Physics. This course and 
Physics 9a are complementary courses affording one full year in theoretical physics, 
but a student may elect either half. Prerequisites, Physics 2 and Mathematics 3 
or Mathematics 3 may be taken concurrently) . No fee. 

11a. Optics and Photography — MR. Sutton. 

A study of the principles of physical optics with special reference to photography 
followed by a systematic study of the photographic process. Laboratory work 
includes both measurements in optics and photographic dark-room manipulations. 
Text: Mack and Martin, The Photographic Process. A fee of $7.50 per semester 
is charged. Prerequisite, Physics 1 or 2. 

12b. Sound — Second half-year. Mr. Benham or Mr. Pepinsky. 

A course of lectures, readings and class experiments designed to familiarize the 
student with recent developments in acoustics. Study is given to the fundamentals 
of sound wave propagation, modern electrical and mechanical acoustic systems, 
architectural acoustics, supersonics, speech and hearing, and the analysis of musical 
sound. Prerequisites, Physics 2, Mathematics 2. Fee, $7.50 per semester. 



Courses of Instruction 83 

13. Physics Seminar — Mr. Sutton and Mr. Benham. 

Advanced students in physics are encouraged to do individual work in special 
fields of investigation. Each student devotes the time equivalent to a full course 
in pursuing comprehensive reading and experimental work on some particular 
topic. Weekly meetings are held with the members of the department to discuss 
the progress in each field of investigation, so that each student becomes familiar 
with problems other than his own. In this course, the accomplishment of scholarly 
work of a nature preliminary to research work is the basis for awarding credit 
toward a degree. Fee, $10.00 per semester. 

14b. Communications — Mr. Benham. 

An introduction to such subjects as telephone, telegraph, teletype and facsimile 
(picture transmission) is given. Also, a major part of the work is devoted to learn- 
ing the Continental Morse code. Laboratory periods are spent in practicing receiv- 
ing and sending the code under the guidance of the Instructor. Supplementary 
reading and code practice are required. Prerequisite, Physics 1 or high school 
physics. Laboratory fee, $4.00. 

15a. Electronics — Mr. Benham. 

This course includes material introductory to electron theory, study and appli- 
cation of vacuum-tubes and problems pertaining to design and analysis of typical 
circuits employing the vacuum-tube. Laboratory experiments are designed to give 
the student experience in the handling of apparatus in which the vacuum-tube is 
used. Prerequisites, Physics 2. Laboratory fee, $7.50 per semester. 

Also called Engineering I7a. 

16b. Advanced Radio — Mr. Benham, 

This course takes up the design and operation of such apparatus as radio trans- 
mitters, receivers, cathode-ray oscillograph, frequency modulated transmitters, 
television. Laboratory periods are intended to give the student experience in 
handling receiving and transmitting equipment. Prerequisite, Physics 15a or 8b. 
Laboratory fee, $7.50. 

Physics 1-2 and 7a were offered in the summer of 1944. 



P 



PSYCHOLOGY 



Courses in Psychology have for their goal the understanding and 
prediction of human behavior. The elementary course is designed 
especially for the premedical student but covers the needs also of the 
student of philosophy and the social sciences, and those expecting to 
assume executive positions. 

1. Elementary Psychology — Mr. Pepinsky. 

A course of three demonstration lecture periods and one laboratory a week to 
illustrate such topics as the nervous system and level of brain functioning, motiva- 
tion of behavior, likes, ways of learning, remembering and inventing. Elective for 
1 undergraduates who have been in residence two terras. 

i 2b. Advanced Psychology — Mr. Steere. 

A study of the nature and functioning of personality by an examination of 
personality in difficulties. Both the forms of abnormal behavior and the modern 
theories of psychotherapy will be studied. Lectures, class reports, and occasional 
trips to clinics. Elective for twelve Juniors and Seniors and only by consent of 
instructor. Prerequisite, Psychology 1. 



84 Haverford College 

ROMANCE LANGUAGES 

The first objective of instruction in the Romance Languages is the 
cultivation of fluent and accurate command of the contemporary 
idiom, both written and oral. Exceptional opportunities for devel- 
oping oral facility in French, Spanish, Italian and German are 
afforded by residence in the Language House. 

Study of the national literatures of France, Spain and Italy pre- 
supposes more than elementary facility in conversation and com- 
position. Admission to literature courses is therefore contingent 
upon the consent of the instructor, which will not ordinarily be 
granted earlier than the completion of at least French 3 or Spanish 2 
or Italian 1, or their equivalents. 

The Department of Romance Languages offers Major Programs in 
French and in Spanish. 

French 

Major Requirements 

French 3, 4, 16b. 17a, 18b. 19a. 

History of France since 1515. 

Supporting courses in the Latin, German, Spanish, Italian and English lan- 
guages and literatures. History of Art, Philosophy; to be arranged in individual 
conference. 

A written and oral comprehensive examination on the language, literature and 
history of France. 

1. Elementary French* — Mrs. Comfort. 

Oral and written introduction to the French language preparatory to French 3. 

2. Intermediate Elementary French* — Mr. Wylie. 

Preparation for French 3; for students presenting one or two years of French 
at entrance. 

3. Advanced Elementary French* — Mrs. Asensio. 

A continuation of the work of French 1 or 2, with additional emphasis on 
reading. 

4. Advanced French Conversation and Composition. 

Normal prerequisites are French 3 and a course in French Literature, but exemp- 
tion from the latter may be granted to well qualified students interested primarily 
in the language. 

16b. French Literature through the Sixteenth Century. 

Lectures with collateral reading and reports on the history of early French 
Literature. 

17a. French Literatiu-e of the Seventeenth Century — Mr. Wylie. 

Reading, reports and discussion of the main currents of thought and the out- 
standing literary figures of the century. 

* These courses meet six hours per week, with corresponding reduction in outside preparation; 
3 hours credit. 



Courses of Instruction 85 

18b. French Literature of the Eighteenth Century. 

Reading, reports and discussion of the main currents of thought and the out- 
standing literary figures of the century. 

19a. French Literature of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries. 

Reading, reports and discussion of the main currents of thought and the out- 
standing literary figures since 1800. 

Spanish 

Major Requirements 

Spanish 3, 4a, 4b, 5a, 6b, 7. 

History of Spain and Spanish America, as a background for literature. 
Supporting courses in the Latin, French, Italian and English languages and 
literatures. History of Art, Philosophy: to be arranged in individual conference. 
Written and/or oral comprehensive examinations. 

1. Elementary Spanish — Mrs. Asensio. 

Oral and written introduction to the Spanish language. 

2. Intermediate Elementary Spanish — Mrs. Asensio. 

A continuation of the work of Spanish 1, with additional emphasis on reading. 

3. Advanced Spanish Conversation and Composition. 

Normal prerequisites are Spanish 2 and a course in Spanish Literature, but 
exemption from the latter may be granted to well qualified students interested 
primarily in the language. 

4a. Spanish Literature from its origins to the Golden Age — Mrs. Asensio. 
Lectures, reading, written and oral reports. 

4b. Introduction to Spanish-American Literature. 

Lectures, reading, written and oral reports. 

5a. Spanish Literature of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries. 

Romanticism in Spain; the Movement of '98. Lectures, reports and discussions. 

6b. Spanish Literature of the Golden Age. 

Cervantes, Lope de Vega, Tirso, Calderon. 

7. Special Topics in Spanish Literature. 

Italian 

1. Elementary Italian — Mr. H. Comfort. 

Oral and written introduction to the Italian Language. Not open to Freshmen. 

2. Readings in Italian Literature. 

The Divina Commedia and other Italian classics. 

SOCIOLOGY 

The courses in Sociology are designed to prepare students for citi- 
zenship in a democracy. Most, if not all, of our problems are at 
bottom traceable to faulty relationships between people and between 
groups of people. Hence, Sociology as the "Science of human rela- 
tions" aims to throw light on the relationship of the individual to 
the group; of group to group; and of group to community. 



86 Haverford College 

Sociology, furthermore, analyzes problems of social maladjustment, 
such as crime, poverty, and the breakdown of family life, which call 
for intelligent social action if community life is to be the matrix 
from which good citizenship is born. 

Major Requirements 

Six half-year courses in Sociology. 

Six other half-year courses or their equivalent, chosen from the following: 
Biology 7, Psychology 1, Psychology 2b, Government 3a, Economics I and Mathe- 
matics 13a, in consultation with the major supervisor. 

Additional selected readings covering a special field in Sociology. 

A four-hour comprehensive examination covering the field of Sociology and 
related courses. 

A three-hour examination, written or oral or both, covering a special field in 
Sociology chosen by the student. 

For graduate students majoring in Sociology, Mathematics 13a (Introduction 
to Statistics) and Mathematics 14b (Advanced Statistics) may be counted as 
courses in Sociology. 

la. An Introduction to Sociology — Mr. Watson. 

This course is an introduction to the scientific study of society. Its purpose is to 
study (1) those social forces and social processes whereby original nature is trans- 
formed into human nature, and (2) a description of the social organization man 
has evolved and the interaction between it and himself. 

2b. Criminology — Mr. Watson. 

Social origins of crime and criminals; costs to the community and society; appre- 
hension and rehabilitation of offenders; police organization; the courts in opera- 
tion; penology, including the probation and parole systems. Trips to penal 
institutions and the criminal courts will be made. Prerequisite, Sociology la. 

4b. Ethnic Relations — Mr. Watson. 

A study of "racial" and cultured factors in American communities. Special 
attention will be paid to the Negro, the American-born Japanese, the American 
Indian, and other minority groups. The particular cultured contributions of 
various minority groups are explored, and methods of resolving conflicts between 
groups are examined. Prerequisite, Sociology la. 

5a. Industry and Society — Mr. Watson. 

A sociological appraisal of modern industrialism. The course includes a detailed 
study of certain social problems, such as unemployment, and other forms of 
economic insecurity. 

Special emphasis is placed on methods of resolving industrial conflict. Studies of 
actual cases before the National War Labor Board are made with the view of 
discovering sound principles of labor management relations. Prerequisite, Eco- 
nomics 1 and Sociology la. 

Also called Economics 5a. 

6b. Labor Policies and Business Management — Mr. ^VATSON. 

A study of business administration and organization and the philosophy of 
management, with special reference to the fields of personnel administration and 
industrial relations. The course surveys the movement for "scientific manage- 
ment." It includes an analysis of the nature, objects and technique of labor 
management, employee representation and union-management cooperation. Pre- 
requisite, Sociology 5a. 

Also called Economics 6b. 



Courses of Instruction 87 

7a. Seminar in Social Science Research — Mr. Watson. 

The seminar aims to acquaint the student with the general methods of research 
in the social sciences and their interrelations. It lays a foundation for the prepara- 
tion of M.A. theses and longer term papers involving social science research 
techniques. 

Classes limited to men majoring in one of the social sciences. Prerequisite, 
one two-term course or two one-term courses in any of the social sciences. 

8b. Problems of the Modern Family — Mr. Watson. 

A seminar course on problems of the modern family and education for parent- 
hood. A discussion of relationships of husband-wife; parent-child; and family- 
community. The emphasis throughout is on factors making for normal family 
life and successful adjustment thereto. Restricted to a limited number of upper 
classmen or graduate students. Apply in advance. Prerequisite, Sociology la. 

9a. The Field of Social Work — Mr. Watson. 

A course of twenty-four lectures beginning in January, 1945, running for six 
weeks. The course will place special emphasis on the principles and technique of 
social case work. Restricted to students in the Relief and Reconstruction unit in 
Haverford College. 

GRADUATE TRAINING IN RECONSTRUCTION 
AND RELIEF 

(See Special Section binder Graduate Students, p. 32) 

The course is run on the quarter system. Autumn quarter, 1944: 
Sept. 25-Dec. 20. Winter quarter, 1945: Jan. 4-Mar. 24. Spring 
quarter, 1945: April 2- June 15. Summer Field Work quarter, 1945: 
June 22-Sept. 18. Autumn quarter, 1945: Sept. 24-Dec. 21. 

Students will be expected to take four courses per quarter. For the 
first three quarters all students who are not fluent in two European 
languages will take two of their four courses in languages. German 
and French will be spoken in the resident dormitory and at meals. 

Sample Program of Studies in 
Graduate Course of Reconstruction and Relief Follows 

First quarter: Double course in Elementary German, or a single course in 
Advanced German and a course in Russian; Philosophy & Practice of Reconstruc- 
tion; Special Area Study. 

Second quarter: Continuation of double course in Elementary German or con- 
tinuation of Advanced German and Russian; six weeks of Social Case Work and 
initial six weeks of sixteen weeks of International Relief Administration; Special 
Area Study, etc. 

German 1. R & R (Elementary German) — Mr. Kelly. 

An intensive double course in German designed to take those who have had 
either no German language study or those with limited study and prepare them 
for a command of spoken German. 

German 2. (Intermediate German) — Mr. Kelly. See German 2. 

German 3. (Advanced German) — Mr. Pfund. See German 3. 



88 Haverford College 

French 1. — Mrs. H. Comfort. 

French 2. — Mr. Wylie. 

French 3. — Mrs. Asensio. 

French 4. R & R — Mr. Wylie. 

A special conversational course designed to improve the fluency of those already 
possessing a grasp of the language. 

Polish 2. — Mr. Wachtel. 
An elementary course to prepare for facility in spoken Polish. 

Russian 1. — Mr. Senn. (Given at Bryn Mawr College.) 
Elementary study of the Russian language. 

Advanced Italian. — Mr. Caselli. 

Advanced Spanish. — Mrs. Asensio. 

Special Area Study. — Messrs. Stinnes, Wylie, Foss, Steere, Pfund, and others. 

An intensive study designed to acquaint future reconstruction workers with 
some of the characteristic features of Central and Northern European social and 
economic life, and with the mentality and character of the people of these areas. 

Autumn quarter: Germany; winter quarter: Germany, Poland, Czechoslovakia, 
Russia; spring quarter: France. 

Lectures by distinguished nationals of each country studied: Bruening, Robert 
Ulich, Stresemann, Sollman, Rauschnig, Segal, Brun, Kohlemainen, Elsa Brangstrom 
Ulich have spoken in this series; papers, journal club, and discussions. 

Philosophy and Practice of ReconsU'uction. — Autumn quarter, Mr. Steere 
and others. 

This course falls into two parts. The first is a series of lectures and biographical 
readings on great humanitarians in an effort to discover the sources of their power 
and to study the evolution of charitable services through the contributions of 
notable figures, such as Francis of Assisi, Vincent de Paul, John Woolman, John 
Frederic Oberlin, Florence Nightingale, Henri Dunant, Jane Addams, Matilda 
Wrede, Albert Schweitzer, and Fridtjof Nansen. 

The second part is a weekly conference with a distinguished administrator or 
field worker of the American Friends Service Committee in order to study inten- 
sively the scope and method of operation of a single reconstruction agency; Rufus 
Jones, Clarence Pickett, John Rich, Leslie Heath, J. Henry Scattergood; Alfred G. 
Scattergood, William Comfort, Howard Comfort, Hertha Kraus, Emily Parker 
Simon, Emma Cadbury, Josiah Marvel and Roger Wilson have spoken in this series. 

Social Case Work. — Winter quarter, 1944 (one-half quarter) . Mr. Watson. 
A concentrated course in social case work presented with special emphasis 
upon the features transferable to foreign reconstruction situations. Lectures and 
field trips. 

International Relief Administration. — Winter and spring quarters (one and 
one-half quarters) . Dr. Hertha Kraus. 

A lecture and seminar course designed to acquaint the student with some back- 
ground of the existing European social welfare facilities; with the principles and 
practices of the major types of relief and reconstruction work that have been 
carried on in Europe; and with the policies of the leading relief and reconstruc- 
tion agencies in this country. Representatives of these agencies will be invited to 
discuss their policies with members of the seminar. Lectures, research projects, 
discussions. 



Courses of Instruction 89 

Bookkeeping and Accounting — Autumn quarter (one-half quarter). Mr. 
Teaf. 

This course is to acquaint future workers with the elements of bookkeeping and 
accounting practices and will use record systems of leading relief agencies in its 
problems. 

Elementary Nutrition — Autumn quarter (one-half quarter) . Miss Hainer and 
Mrs. Mack. 

An orientation in basic principles of nutrition, with special reference to such 
problems as dietary analysis, supplementary feeding, and mass feeding involved 
in foreign relief operations. 

Elementary Village Hygiene — Autumn quarter (one-half quarter) . Mr. Obold. 
A survey of standard emergency practices in disposal of waste, purification of 
water, control of disease carriers, epidemic prevention and control, etc. 

Mental Hygiene of the Relief Worker — Autumn quarter (one-half quarter) . 
Mr. Steere. 

A study of the common personal problems faced by the relief worker in the 
field with attention directed to the psychological and spiritual resources available 
for a creative adjustment to the situation. 

Work Camp Administration — Autumn quarter (one-half quarter) . Messrs. 
Steere, Miller, Schnitzer, Jackson, Morris. 

A survey of the history and practice of work camps, with particular emphasis 
upon the application of past experience to international labor services in the post- 
war period. 

Applied Work. 

In addition to carrying four courses per quarter, each student will be assigned 
to some type of applied work. The field of this work will be chosen only after 
careful consultation with the student and with an attempt to develop or strengthen 
some special skill useful in the work of reconstruction. In the autumn of 1944 
applied work projects included: apprentice work with different sections of the 
American Friends Service Committee, apprenticeship to the week-end work-camp 
under the direction of David and Mary Richie, child care in day nursery, work 
with consumers' cooperatives, nurses' assistant work at the Douglass Hospital in 
Philadelphia, secretarial work, and employment providing experience in dietary 
management. 

Field Work Projects. 

In the summer quarter all students will be assigned to a three months' period 
of field work to be chosen from available projects, again with an attempt to 
strengthen and develop the students' special skills useful in Reconstruction. In the 
summer of 1944 five students directed volunteer work-camps under the A.F.S.C.; 
five served in model detention programs in Sleighton Farms and the Massachu- 
setts Reformatory for Women; two served in a nutrition experiment in Phila- 
delphia; one was a member of the UNRRA staff in Washington; two were staff 
members of the Henry Street Settlement Farm Camp; one served in a Home Mis- 
sion Rural Community Project in Higgins, N. C; two were nurses' aides in a 
Federal Migratory Worker Camp Program in Texas; tuo worked in a Recreational 
Program with children in a large camp of Polish refugees at Colonia Santa Rosa 
in Mexico. 



DEGREES, PRIZES, AND HONORS 
GRANTED IN 1943-1944 

Degrees 

The following degrees were conferred on Haverford students 
enrolled in the V-12 Navy Unit at Swarthmore College on October 24, 
1943. The class association of accelerated students is listed. 

BACHELORS OF SCIENCE 
Horace Newton Compton, Jr., 1944 William Eastman Howe, 1944 
Jodie Dee Crabtree, Jr., 1944 John Bronson Logan, 1944 

Allan Corning Hamilton, 1944 

The following degrees were conferred on Commencement Day, 
February 12, 1944. 

BACHELORS OF ARTS 
Maria Louisa Gildemeister, 1944 Edgar William Willar, Jr., 1944 

Manuel Joseph Gomez, 1944 

BACHELORS OF SCIENCE 
Ellsworth Chapman Alvord, Jr., 1944 George Dearborn Hopkins, 1944 
John Arthur Frantz, 1944 

The following degrees were conferred on Haverford students 
enrolled in the V-12 Navy Unit at Swarthmore College on Febru- 
ary 27, 1944. 

BACHELORS OF SCIENCE 
Arthur Rice Harned, 1945 Donald Alexander Purdy, 1945 

Roy Herrick Hopkins, 1945 Stagey Harrison Widdicombe, Jr., 1945 

David Mallery, 1945 

The following degrees were conferred on Commencement Day, 
June 3, 1944. 

BACHELORS OF ARTS 
Samuel Mickle Fox, 3rd, 1945 Clark Everett Hulings, 1945 

Edgar Dauphin Free, 1944 Henry Fillmore Lankford, 1945 

David Evans Grant, 1945 James Boyer Wright, 1945 

Robert White Hill, 1944 William Leonardo Lehmann, 1945 

As of 1942 
Edwin Harrington 

BACHELORS OF SCIENCE 
Richard Wallace Cole, 1945 Edmund Goerke, Jr., 1944 

Henry Harter Fetterman, 1945 Vernon Metcalf Root, 1945 

As of 1943 
Thomas Elkinton 

90 



Degrees 9 1 

The following degrees were conferred on Commencement Day, 
August 25, 1944. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE 
John Lyle Street 

BACHELORS OF ARTS 

Theodore Crandall Alford, Jr., 1944 Masamori Kojima, 1945 

George Rowland Cocks, 1944 Charles McCurdy Mathias, Jr., 1944 

Charles Edwin Fox, Jr., 1944 Herbert Norman Slotnick, 1945 
David Yi-Yung Hsia, 1945 

BACHELORS OF SCIENCE 

Edward Block, 1945 Douglas Cary Wendell, Jr., 1944 

Thomas Mason Tr.\iner, 1945 

Corporation Scholarships for the Summer Term, 1944 
(Award Made on the Basis of Semesters Completed) 

7 Semesters 
David Yi-Yung Hsl\ Masamori Kojima 

5-6 Semesters 
David E. Long Paul H. Domincovich 

3^ Semesters 
Albert H. Ewell, Jr. Charles Long, II 

1-2 Semesters 
Robert H. Richie, Jr. Ian Huebsch 

Entering Class 
Timothy B. Atkeson John T. Whitman 

Corporation Scholarships for the Fall Term, 1944-1945 

7-S Semesters 
Paul H. Domincovich Thomas Joseph Ryan 

3-6 Semesters 
Albert H. Ewell, Jr. David E. Long 

3-4 Semesters 
Ian Huebsch Julius Katchen 

1-2 Semesters 
Richard Malcolm Gilmour Murray Fox Freeman 

Entering Class 
David Edward Thomas Judson LaMoure Ihric 



92 Haverford College 

PRIZES 

The Clementine Cope Fellowship for 1944-45 ($700) 

for graduate study at another institution was awarded to 

Robert Briggs Day, 1944 

The Class of 1S96 Prizes ($20 in books) in Mathematics 

for Sophomores were awarded to 

Thomas Paton Goodman, 1946 

Cloyd Marvin, 1947 

The Mathematics Department Prizes ($25 for Freshmen) 

awarded in competition by examination were awarded to 

First Prize ($15) , Murray Fox Freeman, 1948 

Second Prize ($10) , Ian Huebsch, 1947 

The Alumni Prize for Composition and Oratoiy ($50) 

was divided between 

Masamori Kojima, 1944 

William Huston Chartener, 1946 

The William Ellis Scull Prize ($35) 

for the upper classman who shall have shown the "greatest achievement in 

voice and the articulation of the English language" was awarded to 

Theodore Martin Hiltner, 1945 

The Scholarship Improvement Prizes ($95) 

for the two Seniors who have shown the most steady and marked improvement 

in scholarship during the college course were awarded as follows: 

First Prize ($50) , Henry Fillmore Lankford, 1944 

Second Prize ($45) was divided between 

Richard Wallace Cole, 1944 

Vernon Metcalf Root, 1944 

The Founders Club Prize ($25) 

for the Freshman who has shown the best attitude toward college activities 

and scholastic work was awarded to 

Lawrence D. Steefel, Jr., 1947 

The Newton Prize in English Literature ($50) 

was awarded to 

Edward Burroughs Irving, Jr., 1944 



HONOR SOCIETIES 

The following students were elected to the Phi Beta Kappa Society 

Edmond Emerson Hammond, Jr., 1944 Richard Wallace Cole, 1945 
Samuel Emlen Stokes, Jr., 1944 

The following students were elected to the Founders Club, an organization 
based on merit in both studies and college activities 

As of 1943 

John Richard Gary, 1945 Edward Preston, III, 1945 

David Yi-Yung Hsia, 1945 Stacey Harrison Widdicombe, Jr., 1945 

Robert Gilmour Pontius, 1945 



Honors 93 

As of 1944 
Henry Harter Fetterman, 1945 William Huston Chartener, 1946 

Samuel Mickle Fox, 3rd, 1945 George Montgomery, Jr., 1946 

Manuel Joseph Gomez, 1944 William Edwards Sherpick, 1946 

Robert Haig Bedrossian, 1946 

The following students were elected to the 
Tau Kappa Alpha National Honorary Debating Fraternity 

As of 1943 
John Richard Gary, 1945 David Yi-Yung Hsia, 1945 

William Huston Chartener, 1946 Charles Spahr Sangree, 1946 

Thomas Paton Goodman, 1946 Richard Spatz, 1946 

As of 1944 
Richard Wallace Cole, 1944 Masamori Kojima, 1944 

Walter Yoneo Kato, 1946 John Kelway Libby, 1946 

HONORS 
FINAL HONORS 

Including Honors, High Honors, and Highest Honors awarded upon graduation, 
and by vote of the Faculty on recommendation of a department or group of related 
departments. Awarded only to students whose work has been more profound 
in a given field, or more extensive in scope, than the minimum required, and 
who have fulfilled all the requirements for Final Honors in their respective Major 
Departments. 

High Honors 

Richard Wallace Cole, 1944 Physics 

David Yi-Yung Hsia, 1945 Chemistry 

Masamori Kojima, 1944 Government 

Honors 
Edward Block, 1945 Physics 

PRELIMINARY HONORS 
Charles Caldwell Ryrie, 1946 Music 

HONORABLE MENTION 

In Single Courses in the Freshman or Sophomore Year 

Representing a minimum of 60 hours of Honors work in addition to that required 

for the course named, plus a grade of 85 or better, in the same course. 

James Fowler Adams, Jr., 1948 English 2b 

Frederick Leighton Blake, 1947 Chemistry 2 

Israel Morris Dowbinstein, 1947 Chemistry 3a, 4a 

David Bernard Konowitz, 1948 English 2b 

Donald Meldrum, 1947 Chemistry 2 

Martin Sanders, 1947 Biology 1 

Howard Warner Starkweather, Jr., 1946 Chemistry 2 



DIRECTORY 

STUDENTS IN THE COLLEGE 

In the last column is given the number of the student's dormitory 
room; F for Founders Hall, G.H. for Government House, L.H. for 
Language House, L for Lloyd Hall, D for day student. The field of 
major concentration is indicated in parentheses. The figure follow- 
ing the name indicates the number of the term now being completed. 
Day students' home telephones are listed after their addresses. 

Division into undergraduate terms and graduate departments will 
be found in Part Two. 

Part One 

CIVILIAN STUDENTS 

(Alphabetically Arranged) 
Name Home Address College Address 

A 

Adams, James Fowler, Jr., 3 29L 

2900 Harrison Street, Wilmington 270, Del. 
Alenick, Monroe Edward, 2 37 L 

292 Eastern Parkway, Newark 6, N. J. 
Atkeson, Timothy Breed, 2 18 L 

3673 Upton Street, N. W., Washington 8, D. C. 

B 

Bailey, M. Omar, 2 12 L 

160 N. Main Street, West Hartford 7, Conn. 
Baker, Robert Knoche, 1 35 L 

355 Columbia Avenue, Palmerton, Pa. 
Barker, William Pierson, II, 2 30 F 

1553 Shorb Avenue, N. W., Canton 3, Ohio 
Barlow, Robert, 1 Day 

CPS 49, Cottage 5, Phila. State Hospital, Philadelphia 14, Pa. 
Beardsley, John Post, 7 (English) 14 L 

1919 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Bell, William Warren, 2 25 L 

4409 Greenwich Parkway, N. W., Washington 7, D. C. 
Beloof, Robert, 6 Day 

CPS 49, Cottage 1, Phila. State Hospital, Philadelphia 14, Pa. 
Bernstein, Daniel Seymour, 2 36 L 

3700 Hilton Road, Baltimore 15, Md. 
BiRDSALL, Joseph Cooper, Jr., 1 20 L 

139 Booth Lane, Haverford, Pa. 
Blum, Kenneth Richard, 2 36 L 

1185 Park Avenue, New York 28, N. Y. 
Bouzarth, William Francis, II, 2 11 L 

635 Belair Avenue, Aberdeen, Md. 

94 



Directory 95 

Name Home Address College Address 

Brawner, David Montgomery, 2 32 L 

107 Highland Drive, Chevy Chase, Md. 
Brown, Rodman Weld, 4 Merion 

416 Linden Street, Wellesley Hills, Mass. 
BuTTRicK, David Gardner, 1 9F 

21 E. 79th Street, New York City 

C 

Cameron, Angus Malcolm, 7 (Chemistry) 21 L 

318 8th Avenue, S. E., Minot, N. D. 
Cavell, Matthew Stuart, 2 37 L 

1125 S. E. First Street, Evansville 9, Ind. 
Chartenf.r, William Huston, 7 (History) 3 L 

414 Parkway, Monessen, Pa. 
Clayton, Robert Francis, Jr., 4 IL 

49 E. Providence Road, Lansdowne, Pa. 
Coffin, Lewis Edward, 7 (Chemistry) 5 F 

150 Church Street, Newton 58, Mass. 
Collins, Benjamin McVickar, 1 16 L 

Broadlea Farm, Rhinebeck, N. Y. 
Cook, Edward Marshall, Jr., 7 (Physics) Day 

56 Cedarbrook Road, Ardmore, Pa. Hilltop 5690. 
Culbert, Craig Dunlap, 1 Day 

26 Chatham Road, Ardmore, Pa. 

D 

Daudon, Marc Daniel, 2 Day 

623 Walnut Lane, Haverford, Pa. Ardmore 0986W. 
Davis, Alan Marvin, 5 (Chemistry) 21b F 

205 W. 89th Street, New York, N. Y. 
Domincovich, Paul Henry, 8 (R & R) 15 L 

236 W. School Lane, Germantown, Philadelphia, Pa. Ardmore 5562. 
DoRN, Richard Kenneth, 1 Day 

6140 Nassau Road, Philadelphia, Pa. Greenwood 2618. 
Dowbinstein, Israel Morris. 5 (Chemistry) Day 

3211 N. 17th Street, Philadelphia, Pa. Radcliff 2406. 
Drake, Charles Daniel, 2 22 F 

47 Main Street, Franklin, N. J. 

E 

Ecroyd, Henry, Jr., 4 (Engineering) 17 F 

226 Lenoir Avenue, Wayne, Pa. 
Edgerton, Charles Willis, Jr., 1 10 L 

College Avenue, Haverford, Pa. 
Elliott, Ralph Menges, 2 30 F 

19 Grace Court, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Ewell, Albert Hunter, Jr., 6 (Psychology) 38 L 

4937 Walton Avenue, Philadelphia 43, Pa. 

F 

Flaherty, Joseph Paul, 1 Day 

286 Trent Road, Penn Wynne, Montgomery County, Pa. Ardmore 5730. 

Fleming, Thomas Talbot, 2 Day 

Valley Green Road, Flourtown, Pa. Whitemarsh 3233. 

Freeman , Murray Fox, 3 Day 

324 N. Bowman Avenue, Merion, Pa. Merion 1198. 



96 Haverford College 

Name Home Address College Address 

G 

Ganter, Robert Lewis, 1 10 L 

830 Elsinore Place, Chester, Pa. 
Geoffroy, Charles Henry, 2 Day 

509 Wilde Avenue, Drexel Hill, Pa. Clearbrook 7828. 
Gerlach, Thomas Bradfield, 1 10 F 

1526 N. 15th Street, Philadelphia 29, Pa. 
GiLMOUR, Richard Malcolm, 2 18L 

249 Green Avenue, Lansdowne, Pa. 
Good, Robert Crocker, 7 (Philosophy) 3 F 

419 Homestead Avenue, Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

Gorham, William Kane, III, 1 31 L 

3346 Tilden Street, Philadelphia 29, Pa. 
Gregson, E. Wesley, 7 (Philosophy) Day 

758 Beechwood Road, Beechwood, Upper Darby, Pa. Ardmore 0761R. 
Gross, Gerald Cannop, Jr., 4 c/o Dr. Sutton 

3130 Wisconsin Avenue, N. W., Washington, D. C 
Gross, Sheldon Harley, 7 (History) 33 L 

Quarters 15a, Fort Myer, Va. 
Grossman, Alfred Durant, 2 19L 

10 Wakeraan Place, Larchmont, N. Y. 
Grubb, J. Spenser, 1 30 L 

420 Meadowbrook Avenue, St. Davids, Pa. 

Gunnison, Foster, Jr., 1 23 L 

R. D. 2, Carrael, N. Y. 

H 

Harden, Robert Schermerhorn, 1 30 L 

341 E. Main Street, Moorestown, N. J. 
Harris, William Hamilton, 2 26 L 

204 N. 17th Street, Camp Hill, Pa. 
Hauser, John Norman, 1 29 L 

7443 Oakhill Avenue, Wauwatosa, Wis. 
Hawkins, Lee Wyeth, 2 32 L 

Marionville, Mo. 
Henne, John Kraffert, 4 32 L 

332 W. Oak Street, Titusville, Pa. 
Herter, Theophilus John, 7 (Philosophy) Day 

232 Wendover Drive, Westgate Hills, Upper Darby, Pa. Hilltop 1016. 
Hiltner, Theodore Martin, 7 (Philosophy) Gym 

4215 E. 33rd Street, Seattle, Wash. 
Hopkins, Frank Thomas, 2 IIL 

316 Thornhill Road, Baltimore 12, Md. 
Huebsch, Ian, 4 7F 

285 Central Park, W., New York 24, N. Y. 
Hutchins, James Sewall, Jr., 7 (Philosophy) Day 

529 Montgomery Avenue, Haverford, Pa. 
Hutchinson, Ernest Charles, 1 Day 

101 Grandview Road, Ardmore, Pa. Ardmore 0575W. 



Ihrig, Judson LaMoure, 1 15 F 

2611 E. Beverly Road, Milwaukee 11, Wis. 



Directory 97 

Name Home Address College Address 

J 

Jacob, James Archibald, Jr., 2 30 F 

1310 Pleasant Avenue, Wellsburg, W. Va. 
Jacobs, George Wayne, Jr., 4 14 L 

25 Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y. 
Johnson, David, 5 (Philosophy) 15 L 

18 W. 122nd Street, New York, N. Y. 
Johnson, James Dexter, 1 18 F 

250 S. Brentwood, Clayton, Mo. 
Johnson, Richard Schaper, 1 28 L 

328 W. 22nd Street, Erie, Pa. 

K 

Katchen, Julius, 5 (Philosophy) 38 L 

2 Hollywood Avenue, West Long Branch, N. J. 
Kato, Walter Yoneo, 5 (Physics) 19 F 

5210 Winthrop Avenue, Chicago 40, 111. 
Kennedy, Francis Rich.\rd, 6 (Physics) 15 L 

810 High Street, Paris, Ky. 
KiMMiCH, Homer, 1 Day 

505 Lancaster Avenue, Haverford, Pa. 
Kindler, Don, 1 13 F 

Jessups, Md. 
KoNowiTz, David Bernard, 3 7a F 

85-21 Homelawn Street, Jamaica, L. I., N. Y. 

L 

Langston, Thomas Dinsmore, 2 Day 

621 Malvern Road, Ardmore, Pa. Ardmore 6715. 
Levensohn, Alan Mark, 1 34 L 

36 Dolphin Road, Newton Centre, Mass. 
Long, David E., 7 (International Government) 3 L 

1522 Cleveland Avenue, Wyomissing, Pa. 

M 

Makel, John Selby, 1 21 F 

Hdq. 8th Service Command, Dallas, Tex. 
Mann, Philip Carl, 2nd, 7 (Government) 16 L 

116 East Riverbank, Beverly, N. J. 
Mathis, James Leslie, 1 22 F 

R. D. 1, Wyalusing, Pa. 
Mead, Brian, Jr., 2 27 L 

1 1 Horseguard Lane, Scarsdale, N. Y. 
Meyers, Robert Weigel, 3 4L 

132 W. 9th Street, Erie, Pa. 
Miller, William Henry, 2 2F 

7703 Crossland Road, Baltimore 8, Md. 
Moore, Charles Byrd, 1 16 F 

25 Amherst Avenue, Swarthmore, Pa. 
Moses, Charles Henry Mann, Jr., 4 Day 

433 Haverford Road, Wynnewood, Pa. Ardmore 4396. 
MuENCH, James Frederick, 5 3L 

300 Riverside Drive, New York 25, N. Y. 



98 Haverford College 

Name Home Address College Address 

N 

Newman, Paul Freedman, 2 IIL 

7 Balfour Circle, Lansdowne, Pa. 
NoFER, George Hancock, 2nd, 3 Day 

632 W. Elkins Avenue, Philadelphia 20, Pa. Hancock 3220. 
Norton, Richard William, Jr., 8 (Spanish) Day 

Haverford Court, Haverford, Pa. Ardmore 0947. 

O 

Olivier, Daniel Dretzka, 1 7F 

Box 306, R. D. 2, Phoenixville, Pa. 
Oppenheimer, Martin J., 2 19 L 

3506 Bancroft Road, Baltimore 15, Md. 
Oswald, David Station, 1 13 L 

826 The Terrace, Hagerstown, Md. 

P 

Payro, Roberto Pablo, 5 2 L 

Lavalle 357, Buenos Aires, Argentina 
Pease, William, 2 31 L 

207 Bloomfield Avenue, Hartford, Conn. 
Peter, David Alexander, 2 23 L 

45 N. 11th Street, Allentown, Pa. 
Petersen, Hans Eberhard, 5 (Greek) Merion 

145 95th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Power, Richard Wilson, 1 14 F 

25 Pine Street, Canton, N. Y. 

R 

Rivers, Richard D., 5 (Physics) 1 1 F 

1281 Everett Avenue, Louisville, Ky. 
Roche, Robert Pearson, 5 (English) 1 L 

111 7th Street, Garden City, L. I., N. Y. 
Roosevelt, Dirck, 1 34 L 

9 Sutton Place, New York City 
Rosenthal, David Richard, 2 33 L 

609 Reservoir Street, Baltimore 17, Md. 

RUTLEDGE, NeAL PERSON, 1 22 L 

4928 Indian Lane, Washington 16, D. C. 

Ryan, Thomas Joseph, 7 (English) 20 L 

1216 Lindale Avenue, Drexel Hill, Pa. 

S 

Sanders, Martin, 4 4L 

55 Clinton Place, Bronx, New York, N. Y. 
Sato, Jyuichi, 6 (Physics) Day 

c/o Dr. Frank Watson, 773 College Avenue, Haverford, Pa. Ardmore 2937. 
Segal, Marvin, 2 Day 

729 Snyder Avenue, Philadelphia 48, Pa. Dewey 6687. 
Settle, Lyle G., 2 20 F 

Dryden, N. Y. 
Snodgrass, Francis Mattlage, 1 35 L 

Windfall, R. D. 1, Martinsburg, W. Va. 



Directory 99 

Name Home Address College Address 

Starkweather, Howard Warner, Jr., 4 29 L 

815 Augusta Road, Wilmington 67, Del. 
Steefel, Lawrence D., Jr., 5 (German) 21 L 

2808 West River Road, Minneapolis, Minn. 
Stimson, Arthur H., 3 Day 

8 Simpson Road, Ardmore, Pa. Ardmore 2258. 
Stone, John Alexander, 1 4 F 

319 W. 88th Street, Apt. 8, New York City. 
Stuart, John Walker, 8 (Biology) Day 

Apt. B-1, Thornbrook Manor Apts., 819 Montgomery Avenue, Bryn Mawr, 
Pa. Bryn Mawr 1533. 
Sturr, George Bowler TuLLmcE, 5 (Government) 17 L 

129 Fourth Avenue, Haddon Heights, N. J. 

T 

Thomas, David Edward, 1 Day 

518 Foss Avenue, Drexel Hill, Pa. 
Thompson, Daniel Bard, 3 22 L 

110 S. Broad Street, Waynesboro, Pa. 
Thompson, William James Mullins, 3 26 L 

926 Elk Street, Franklin, Pa. 
Turley, Keith Harold, 2 25 L 

501 Camden Avenue, Moorestown, N. J. 
Tuttle, Edwin Ellsworth, 2 27 L 

76 Hillcrest Avenue, Summit, N. J. 



Vedova, Harold Frederick, 1 Day 

1463 Hampstead Rd., Penn Wynne, Philadelphia 31, Pa. Ardmore 3750R. 

w 

Walters, James Donald, 3 2L 

90 Brite Avenue, Scarsdale, N. Y. 
Wheeler, Edward Stubbs, 2 24 L 

Route 3, Greencastle, Pa. 
Whitcomb, Harold Clark, Jr., 2 13 L 

337 N. 25th Street, Camp Hill, Pa. 
Whitehead, H. Macy, 5 (Philosophy) IF 

R. D. 1, South Windham, Maine. 
Whitman, John Turner, 2 12 L 

Nashawtuc Hill, Concord, Mass. 
WiNGERD, Robert Aitken, 2 24 L 

Edgar Avenue and Riddle Road, Chambersburg, Pa. 



Zweifler, Nathan Joseph, 2 12 L 

46 Wilbur Avenue, Newark, N. J. 

RECONSTRUCTION AND RELIEF UNIT 
A 

Anderson, Ruth Agnes (A.B., Wellesley, 1941) G. H. 

1945 Second Avenue, S. E., Cedar Rapids, la. 
Atkinson, Anna Margaret (A.B., Brown, 1942) L. H. 

Wrightstown, Pa. 



100 Haverford College 

Name Home Address College Address 

B 

Barclay, Mary (A.B., Middlebury, 1943) L. H. 

424 N. BlufF, Wichita, Kansas. 
Barlow, Joan H. (A.B., Grinnell, 1944) G. H. 

157 Sheldon Avenue, Ames, la. 
Brooks, Charlotte Hallowell (A.B., Smith, 1942) L. H. 

45 Mystic Street, West Medford, Mass. 
Brown, Sydney Thomson (B.A., Smith, 1943) L. H. 

99 Claremont Avenue, New York, N. Y. 

c 

Calkins, Fay Gilkey (B.A., Oberlin, 1943) L. H. 

1112 N. Evergreen Street, Arlington, Va. 
Gary, Sarah Comfort (A.B., Vassar, 1940) L. H. 

EUet Lane and Wissahickon Avenue, Mt. Airy, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Cunningham, Nancy Louise (B.A., Smith, 1944) G. H. 

214 Forest Park Boulevard, Janesville, Wis. 



Driscoll, Ruth Antoinette L. H. 

1629 Asbury Avenue, Evanston, 111. 

F 

Feise, Dorelen (B.A., Oberlin, 1944) G. H. 

401 Rosebank Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 
FowLE, Helen Joy (B.A., Wellesley, 1943) L. H. 

Thetford, Vt. 
Freeman, Charles (B.A., Wake Forest College, 1942) (M.A., University of 

North Carolina, 1944) Day 

Pendle Hill, Wallingford, Pa. (Old Fayetteville Road, Raleigh, N. C.) 
Freyhof, Betty Keith (A.B., Wellesley, 1944) G. H. 

3819 Clifton Avenue, Cincinnati 20, O. 

G 

Garrison, Elizabeth B. (A.B., Swarthmore, 1938) L. H. 

Cedarville, N. J. 
Gedney, Eloise (A.B., Flora Stone Mather, 1942) G. H. 

117 Maplewood Avenue, Maplewood, N. J. 
Gildemeister, Maria Luisa (A.B., Haverford, 1944) L. H. 

Casilla Correo 678, Lima, Peru. 
Goodier, Richard Barritt (A.B., Brown, 1935) (S.T.B., The Biblical Semi- 
nary in New York, 1938) (M.A., Drew Seminary, 1943) F. H. 

445 High Street, Lonsdale, R. L 
Graham, Carolyn (B.A., H. Sophie Newcomb, 1944) G. H. 

7821 Freret Street, New Orleans 18, La. 
Grant, Barbara Stevens (A.B., Colby, 1943) G. H. 

75 Coleman Road, Wethersfield, Conn. 

H 

Haggard, Barbara A. (A.B., Wells, 1943) G. H. 

3100 Warrington Road, Shaker Heights, O. 
Holmes, Barbara Ristine (A.B., Wells, 1942) G. H. 

2734 N. Stowell Avenue, Milwaukee 11, Wis. 
HovEY, Sarah Edith (A.B., Reed, 1944) c/o Dr. H. Comfort 

833 34th Avenue, N., Seattle, Wash. 



Directory 101 

Name Home Address College Address 



IsGRiG, AiMEE Margaret (A.B., Rockford, 1944) G. H. 

1547 Upper Parkway, Wauwatosa, Wis. 



Jones, Annette Roberts (B.A., Wellesley, 1941) (M.Ed., Winnetka, 1942) . . .L. H. 
272 Vine Avenue, Highland Park, 111. 

K 

Knight, Bernice Eva (B.A., Colby, 1944) G. H. 

County Road, Westbrook, Me. 
Krancer, Priscilla (B.A., Vassar, 1942) L. H, 

c/o Captain Sprague, St. Albans Hospital, L. I., N. Y. 

L 

Langston, Martha Porter (A.B., Scripps, 1937) L. H. 

1844 Pepper Drive, Altadena, Calif. 
Litchman, Jean M. (A.B., University of Washington, 1943) G. H. 

408 E. 50th Street, Seattle, Wash. 

M 

Morrison, Esther (B.S., Mississippi State, 1938) (M.S., University of Louis- 
ville, 1940) Day 

17 Railroad Avenue, Haverford, Pa. (3111 Drummond Street, Vicksburg, 
Miss.) 

P 

Page, Laurama (B.A., Swarthmore, 1943) L. H. 

2424 Lincoln Street, Evanston, 111. 
Plumb, Lois Virginia (B.A., Wilson College, 1943) L. H. 

20 Primrose Avenue, Tuckahoe, N. Y. 
PoHL, Claudine Blanche (A.B., Oberlin, 1944) G. H. 

215 W. 83rd Street, New York, N. Y. 

R 

Rigsbee, Alfred Swain (A.B., Earlham, 1944) Day 

Pendle Hill, Wallingford, Pa. ("The Maples," Arlington, Ind.) 

Russell, Florence O. (A.B., Scripps, 1944) G. H. 

1811 El Encanto Road, Santa Barbara, Calif. 

s 

Shorter, Fred Claiborne (A.B., Reed, 1944) F. H. 

3208 Franklin Avenue, Seattle 2, Wash. 

T 

Taft, Rebekah L. (A.B., Bryn Mawr, 1933) G. H. 

Gray Farm, Salem Street, Andover, Mass. 



102 

Name 



Haverford College 

Home Address 



College Address 



w 

Wehmeyer, Jean Adele (B.A., Smith, 1943) L. H. 

R. D. S., Clinton Corners, N, Y. 
WiLHELM, Frederick Oscar (B.A., Wesleyan, 1944) Day 

Pendle Hill, Wallingford, Pa. (Box 35, North Granby, Conn.) 
Williams, Mary Esther (B.A., Vassar, 1943) L. H. 

1317 Bishop Road, Crosse Pointe, Mich. 
Williams, Mrs. Robert K. (Miriam) (B. of Arch., Alabama Polytechnic Insti- 
tute, 1935) G. H. 

2300 St. Stephen's Road, Mobile 17, Ala. 
Williams, Wendell W. (A.B., College of Emporia, 1938) (M.A., University 

of Kansas, 1941) (M.S., George Williams College, 1942) Day 

Pendle Hill, Wallingford, Pa. (Route No. 1, Emporia, Kans.) 
Wylie, Anne Stiles (B.S., Simmons, 1943) G. H. 

270 Brookline Avenue, Boston, Mass. 
Wylie, Laurence William (A.B. & M.A., Indiana, 1931, 1933) (Ph.D., Brown 

University, 1940) G. H. 

270 Brookline Avenue, Boston, Mass. 



Part Two 



Domincovich 15 L 

Beardsley 14 L 

Cameron 21 L 

Chartener 3 L 

Coffin 5F 

Cook Day 

Beloof Day 

Ewell 38 L 

Davis, A 21b F 

Dowbinstein Day 

Johnson, D 15 L 

Katchen 38 L 

Kato 19 F 

Brown Merion 

Clayton 1 L 

Ecroyd 17 F 

Gross, G. C, c/o Dr. Sutton 



8th Term (3) 
Norton Day Stuart 



7th Term (14) 

Gregson Day 

Gross, S. H 33 L 

Hiltner Gym 

Herter Day 

Hutchins Day 



5th Term (13) 

Muench 3 L 

Payro 2L 

Petersen Merion 

Rivers IIF 

Roche 1 L 

4th Term (10) 

Henne 32 L 

Huebsch 7 F 

Jacobs, G 14 L 



• Day 



Long 3 L 

Good 3F 

Mann 16 L 

Ryan 20 L 



6th Term (4) 
Kennedy 15 L Sato 



.Day 



Steefel 21 L 

Sturr 17 L 

Whitehead IF 



Moses Day 

Sanders 4 L 

Starkweather 29 L 



Directory 



103 



P.\RT Two (Cent.) 



Adams 29 L 

Freeman Day 

Konowiu 7a F 

.\lenick 37 L 

Atkeson 18L 

Bailev 12 L 

Barker 30 F 

Bell 25 L 

Bernstein 36 L 

Blum 36 L 

Bouzarth IIL 

Brawner 32 L 

Cavell 37 L 

Daudon Dav 

Drake 22 F 

Elliott 30 F 

Baker 35 L 

Barlow Day 

Birdsall 20 L 

Buttrick 9F 

Collins 16 L 

Culbert Day 

Dom Day 

Edgerton 10 L 

Flaherty Day 

Ganter 10 L 

Gerlach 10 F 

Gorham 31 L 



3rd Term (9) 

Meyers 4 L 

Xofer Day 

Stimson Day 

2nd Term (38) 

Fleming Day 

Geoffroy Day 

Gilmour 18 L 

Grossman 19 L 

Harris 26 L 

Hawkins 32 L 

Hopkins IIL 

Jacob 30 F 

Langston Day 

Mead 27 L 

Miller 2F 

Newman IIL 

Oppenheimer 19 L 

1st Term (35) 

Grubb 30 L 

Gunnison 23 L 

Harden 30 L 

Hauser 29 L 

Hutchinson Day 

Ihrig 15 F 

Johnson, J. D 18 F 

Johnson, R 28 L 

Kimmich Day 

Kindler 13F 

Levensohn 34 L 

Makel 21 F 



Thompson, D. B....22L 
Thompson, W. J. M.,26 L 
Walters 2L 

Pease 31 L 

Peters 23 L 

Rosenthal 33 L 

Segal Day 

Settle 20 F 

Turlev 25 L 

Tuttle 27 L 

Wheeler 24 L 

Whitcomb 13 L 

W^hitman 12 L 

Wingerd 24 L 

Zweifler 12 L 



Mathis 22 F 

Moore 16 F 

Olivier 7F 

Oswald 13 L 

Power 14 F 

Roosevelt 34 L 

Rutledge 22 L 

Snodgrass 35 L 

Stone 4F 

Thomas Day 

\'edova Dav 



First Gr.aduate Reconstruction and Relief Unit (19) 



Atkinson 
Barclay 
Brooks . 
Brown . 
Calkins 
Carv . . . 
Driscoll 



.L.H. 


Fowle 


...L.H. 


Plumb 


..L.H. 


.L. H. 


Garrison 


...L.H. 


Wehmeyer 


..L.H. 


.L.H. 


Gildemeister . 


...L.H. 


Williams. M. E.. 


..L.H. 


.L.H. 


Jones 


...L.H. 


Wylie, .\. S 


. G. H. 


L.H. 


Krancer 


...L.H. 


Wylie, L. W 


. .G.H. 


L.H. 


Langston 


...L.H. 






.L.H. 


Page 


...L.H. 







Second Gr.\du.\te Reconstruction and Relief Unit (25) 



Anderson . . . 

Barlow 

Cunningham 

Feise 

Freeman . . . . 

Freyhof 

Gedney 

Goodier .... 
Graham . . . . 



.G.H. 

.G.H. 

.G.H. 

.G.H. 
. . .Dav 

.G.H. 

.G.H. 
. .F.H. 

G.H. 



Grant . . . 
Haggard . 
Holmes . . 
Hovey . . 

Knight . . 
Litchman 



G.H. 

G.H. 

G.H. 

Dav 

G.H. 

G.H. 

G.H. 



Morrison Dav 

Pohl G.H. 



Rigsbee Dav 

Russell G. H. 

Shorter F.H. 

Taft G.H. 

Wilhelm Day 

Williams, Mrs. R. K.. 

G.H. 
Williams, W. W Dav 



104 Haverford College 

ASTP Premedical Trainees 

Telephone — Ardmore 9508 
Barclay Hall, Center 

Name Home Address 

AsiNOvsKY, Joseph 28 Morris Street, Rochester, N. Y. 

Backus, John Warner 2203 Grant Avenue, Wilmington, Del. 

Cebulka, Peter Richard Hawk Run, Pa. 

Chojnacki, Bernard 3983 E. 74th Street, Cleveland, O. 

Clark, Randall Lee 520 N. Duke Street, Lancaster, Pa. 

Coyne, John Francis, Jr 11 Cleaves Street, Portland, Me. 

Curtis, James LeRoy Wilton, Wis. 

Delashmutt, Robert Eugene 326 Osman Street, Bucyrus, O. 

DoRFMAN, Murray Lewis 1726 Davidson Avenue, New York, N. Y. 

Droulard, Kenneth Earl 9207 Stone Road, Algonac, Mich. 

Effinger, Gerold Joseph 430 W. Carey Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Johnson, David Halsey 237 Dorer Avenue, Hillside, N. J. 

Malkin, Robert S 8631 112th Street, Richmond Hill, N. Y. 

McCaughey, Richard Stone 1112 Sheridan Drive, Danville, 111. 

McHugh, Daniel 159 Henderson Street, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Ogilvie, Robert Jerrold 59 Edgemoor Avenue, Wellesley, Mass. 

Sergeant, John H., Jr 39-61 65th St., Woodside, L. I., N. Y. 

Smith, Edwin Robert 23 E. 4th Street, Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

Smith, James Anthony R. D. 1, Bainbridge Road, Chagrin Falls, O. 

Spenader, Wayne Frank 1010 Third Avenue, Mendota, 111. 

Tanner, Leonard Michael 1206 S. 14th Street, Cambridge, O. 

Thrall, Howard Curtis Box 75, Manilla, Ind. 

Ulrich, Christian Andrew 3951 N. Hoyne Street, Chicago, 111. 

Wells, Mortimer Hall, Jr 4 Brantwood Road, Arlington, Mass. 

Yamin, Edward Robert 243 S. Grove Street, Freeport, N. Y. 

Zagory, Conrad 223 White Road, Mineola, L. I., N. Y. 



c.9€lo 



Directory 105 



FACULTY AND OFFICERS 

Address Telephone 

Name (Haverford, unless (Ardmore Exchange 

otherwise noted) unless otherwise noted) 

Allendoerfer, Carl B., 750 Rugby Road, Bryn Mawr Bryn Mawr 2568 J 

Asensio, Mrs. Manuel J., 2 College Lane 4163 

Benham, T. A., 3 College Lane 6044 

Cadbury, William E., Jr., 791 College Avenue 0203W 

Caselli, Aldo, Merion Hall 9458 

Comfort, Howard, 5 College Circle 3732 

Comfort, William Wistar, South Walton Road 0455 

Drake, Thomas E., 702 Pennstone Road, Bryn Mawr Bryn Mawr 1534 

Dunn, Emmett R., 748 Rugby Road, Bryn MawT 

Evans, Arlington, 324 Boulevard, Brookline, Upper Darby Hilltop 2043 

Evans, Francis Cope, 1 College Lane 4049W 

Fetter, Frank W., 5 Canterbury Lane, St. Davids Wayne 2449J 

FitzGerald, Alan S., Warick Road & Cotswold Lane, Wynnewood 1404 

Flight, John W., 753 College Avenue 4409W 

Foss, Martin, la College Lane ' 1599 

Gibb, Thomas C, 824 Buck Lane 6949W 

Green, Louis C, 791 College Avenue 4409J 

Gummere, Henry V., 3026 Midvale Avenue, Philadelphia 29 Tennessee 1933 

Haddleton, A. \V., 29 Tenmore Road Bryn Mawr 1235W 

Henry, Howard K., 1464 Drayton Lane, Penn Wynne 3913J 

Hepp, Maylon H., East Founders Hall 9460 

Herndon, John G., 1 College Lane 0364 

Hetzel, Theodore B., 768 College Avenue 4393W 

Holmes, Clayton W., 720 Millbrook Lane 4269W 

Johnston, Robert J., Woodside Cottage 3725 

Jones, Rufus, 2 College Circle 2777 

Kelly, John A., 3 College Lane 4160 

Lockwood, Dean P., 6 College Circle 1402J 

Lunt, William E., 5 College Lane 1507W 

Macintosh, Archibald, 3 College Circle 0961 

Meldrum, William B., 747 College Avenue 0881J 

Morley, Felix, 1 College Circle 4712 

Oakley, Cletus O., Featherbed Lane 3109W 

Palmer, Frederic, Jr., 1 College Lane 6878 

Pepinsky , Abraham, 7 College Lane 5324 

Pfund, Harry W., 624 Overhill Road, Ardmore 5532 

Post, Amy L., C-3 Dreycott Apartments 1643M 

Post, L. Arnold, 9 College Lane 0258M 

Rantz, J. Otto, 2122 Chestnut Avenue, Ardmore 

Rittenhouse, Leon H., 6 College Lane 5522 

Sargent, Ralph M., 4 College Circle 3339 

Scaife, Mary L., E-4 Haverford Gables 51 17 

Snyder, Edward D., 36 Railroad Avenue 0712 



106 Haverford College 

Address Telephone 

Name (Haverford, unless (Ardmore Exchange 

otherwise noted) unless otherwise noted) 

Steere, Douglas V., 739 College Avenue 0162 

Stinnes, Edmund H., 751 Millbrook Lane 6759 

Stone, Brinton H., 774 Millbrook Lane 5555W 

Sutton, Richard M., 785 College Avenue, facing Walton Road 0742W 

Swan, Alfred, 3 College Lane 1562 

Taylor, Dr. Herbert W., 457 Lancaster Avenue 2383 

Teaf, Howard M., Jr., 3 College Lane 4049J 

Volkert, Walter, 871 Martin Avenue, Bryn Mawr Bryn Mawr 2113W 

Watson, Frank D., 773 College Avenue 2937 

Williamson, Alexander J., 4 College Lane 4023 

Wills, William Mintzer, B-201 Merion Garden Apartments, Merion. . .Merion 4760 

Wilson, Albert H., 765 College Avenue 1853 

Wylie, Laurence W., Government House 9613 

MILITARY STAFF 

3327 Service Unit— ASTP Premedical Unit 

Capt. Ralph J. Henry, Inf., Commanding Officer, 

911 Hagysford Road, Penn Valley Cynwyd 0903R 

Permanent Party — Enlisted Personnel 
Telephone — Ardmore 4066 

S/Sgt. J. Hunter McDowell 723 Windermere Avenue, Drexel Hill, Pa. 

Sgt. Richard R. Bullock Box 634, Farmington, New Mexico 

Cpl. Stanley F. Janiak 2700 Oakley Way, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Pfc. Frank Soda 7128 Van Dyke Street, Philadelphia 35, Pa. 



<>3G^ 



Directory 107 

COLLEGE OFFICE AND BUILDING TELEPHONES 

Unless otherwise noted, all telephones below may be reached by calling Ard. 6400 
Academic Director, Premedical ASTP, W. B. Meldrum 
Administrative Secretary, Mary L. Scaife 
Admissions, Archibald Macintosh, Director 
Alumni Office, Brinton H. Stone, Secretary 

Army Specialized Training Unit, Barclay Hall 4066 

Army Units, Academic Records Office 
Assistant to the President, Brinton H. Stone 

Barclay Hall, Center (Pay Station) 9459 

Barclay Hall, North (Pay Station) 9506 

Barclay Hall, South (Pay Station) 9508 

Biology Laboratory (Sharpless Hall) 

Bucky Foundation Office, R & R Unit 

Business Office, Aldo Caselli, Bursar 

Chemistry Laboratory (Profs. W. B. Meldrum, W. E. Cadbury, Jr.) 

Coordinator of Army Units, H. M. Teaf, Jr. 

Dean's Office, Thomas C. Gibb, Acting Dean 

Engineering Laboratory (Hilles) 

Faculty Secretary (at Alumni Office) 

Founders Hall, Dormitory (Pay Station) 9533 

Founders Hall, East (Pay Station) 9460 

Government House, 8 College Lane (Pay Station) 9613 

Gymnasium (Pay Station) 9512 

Gymnasium Office 

Haverford News 4894 

Haverford Review, Brinton H. Stone, Managing Editor 

Hilles Laboratory of Applied Science (Engineering) (Profs. Hetzel, Holmes, 

and Mr. Rantz) 
Infirmary, Mabel S. Beard, R.N. 

Kitchen (Pay Station) 9544 

Language House, Manuel J. Asensio, Director 9428 

Library: D. P. Lockwood (Librarian) , Amy L. Post (Circulation Desk) , 

Thomas E. Drake, Anna B. Hewitt (Treasure Room) 

Lloyd Hall, 3rd Entry (Kinsey) , Rooms 1-12 (Pay Station) 9520 

Lloyd Hall, 5th Entry (Strawbridge) , Rooms 13-26 (Pay Station) 9514 

Lloyd Hall, 8th Entry (Leeds) , Rooms 27-38 (Pay Station) 9628 

Merion Hall 9458 

Observatory 

Physics Laboratory (Sharpless Hall) 

Power House (Pay Station) , after 5:00 p.m 9540 

President, Felix Morley 
Reconstruction and Relief Office 
Registrar, W. M. Wills 

Research Laboratory, Alan S. FitzGerald, Director 5092 

Romance Language Department Office 

Science House, 521 Panmure Road (Pay Station) 9523 

Sharpless Hall: T. A. Benham, H. Comfort, F. C. Evans, H. K. Henry, A. Pepin- 

sky, R. M. Sutton 
Steward, Charles Byles 
Superintendent's Office, Mrs. Viola Chatto 
Vice-President, Archibald Macintosh 
Whitall Hall: Profs. J. W. Flight, Maylon H. Hepp, J. G. Herndon, J. A. Kellv, 

W. E. Lunt, D. V. Steere, H. M. Teaf, Jr., Frank D. Watson, H. W. 

Pfund, R. M. Sargent, E. D. Snyder 
From 5 PM. to 9 A.M. weekdays and after 1 P.M. Saturdays and on Sundays and 
holidays call as follows: 

Bursar 0221 Physics & Engin. Labs 0763 

Dean 0221 President 3761 

Infirmary 3036 Superintendent 0767 

Library 0767 Vice-President 0221 



108 Haverford College 

GENERAL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION OF 
HAVERFORD COLLEGE 

President 

Edward A. Edwards, '08 
Walnut Lane, Haverford, Pa. 

Vice-Presidents 

Wesley M. Heilman, '24 
Alldwyn Avenue, Villa Nova, Pa. 

WiLMOT R. Jones, '23 
Alapocas Drive, Wilmington, Del. 

Albert E. Rogers, '21 
Perkiomen School, Pennsburg, Pa. 

Acting Secretary 

Brinton H. Stone 
Haverford College, Haverford, Pa, 

Treasurer 

Walter C. Baker, '32 
Girard Trust Co., Phila., Pa. 



Haverford Club of Philadelphia 
1607 Moravian St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

President I. Thomas Steere, '16 

Vice-President George W. Emlen, Jr., '08 

Secretary Harris G. Haviland, '26 

Treasurer Arthur S. Roberts, '32 

New York Haverford Society 

President Geoffroy Billo, '25 

30 Broad St., New York, N. Y. 

Vice-President Oliver W. Melchoir, '28 

Junior High School, Scarsdale, N. Y. 

Secretary R. Wilfred Kelsey, '33 

60 East 42nd St., New York, N. Y. 

Treasurer Herbert F. Taylor, '28 

806 Pelhamdale Ave., New Rochelle. N. Y. 



Directory 109 

Haverford Society of Maryland 

President Franklin O. Curtis, '26 

4412 Norwood Rd., Baltimore, Md. 

1st Vice-President Joseph M. Beatty, Jr., '13 

308 Thornhill Rd., Baltimore, Md. 

2nd \'ice-President Gilbert Henry Moore, '17 

Cromwell Bridge Rd., Towson, Md. 

Secretary William W. Saunders, '27 

4303 Kathland Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

Treasurer Howard O. Buffington, Jr., '31 

4805 Belle Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

Haverford Society of Washington 

President Allan B. Fay, '27 

3 Ardmore Circle, Friendship Sta., D. C. 

Vice-President Thomas Wistar, Jr., '30 

113 Hesketh St., Chevy Chase, Md. 

Secretary-Treasurer Meredith B. Colket, Jr., '35 

2017 Eye St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Pittsburgh Alumni Association of Haverford College 

President Gifford K. Wright, '93 

First National Bank Building, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Secretary Willard E. Mead, '26 

5800 Walnut St., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Treasurer James M. Houston, '31 

1639 Beechwood Blvd., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Haverford Society of New England 

President Frank M. Eshleman, '00 

40 Broad St., Room 600, Boston, Mass. 

Vice-President Garrett S. Hoag, '23 

10 p. O. Square, Boston, Mass. 

Vice-President Paul Jones, '05 

Marble St., Whitman, Mass. 

Secretary-Treasurer Elliott W. Brown, '21 

23 Bradford Rd., Wellesley Hills, Mass. 



INDEX 



Administration, Officers of , 

Admission: 

Requirements for 

Information Concerning Examinations 

For Graduate Students 

Alumni Associations 

American Literature, Instruction in 

Archaeology (Near Eastern) , Instruction in 

Art, Instruction in 

Astronomy, Instruction in 

Athletic Fields , 

Autograph Collection, Charles Roberts 

Biblical Literature, Instruction in 

Biology, Instruction in 

Botany, Instruction in 

Calendar 

Chemistry, Instruction in 

Clubs 

Committees: 

Of the Board of Managers 

Of the Faculty 

Corporation: 

Officers of 

Members of the Standing Nominating Committee of the. 

Courses of Study 

Courses of Instruction 

Debating and Public Discussion 

Degrees: 

Awarded in 1943-44 

Bachelor's 

Master's 

Delinquent Students 

Description of Haverford College 

Directory 

Economics, Instruction in 

Engineering, Instruction in 

English Language and Literature, Instruction in 

Ethics, Instruction in 

Examinations: 

For Admission 

For the Master's Degree 

Expenses 

Faculty 

Faculty, Standing Committees of 

Faculty, Residence and Telephone Directory 

Fellowships 

Holder of 

French, Instruction in 

Geography and Geology, Instruction in 

German, Instruction in 

110 



Haverford College 111 

Government, Instruction in 70 

Grading of Students 38 

Graduate Students: 

Admission, requirements, charges, courses 29 

Greek, Instruction in 72 

Gymnasium 80 

Hebrew, Instruction in 58 

History, Instruction in 73 

History of Haverford College 7 

Honor Societies, New Membership in 92 

Honor System 8 

Honors: 

Awarded in 1943^4 93 

Requirements for 31 

Infirmary, The Morris 49 

Italian, Instruction in 85 

Laboratory Fees 41 

Latin, Instruction in 74 

Lectures 48 

Library 46 

Loan Fund 45 

Major Requirements 24 

Managers, Board of 12 

Mathematics, Instruction in 75 

Meeting, Friends 8 

Music, Instruction in 76 

Observatory 56 

Phi Beta Kappa Society 49 

Philosophy, Instruction in 78 

Physical Education 79 

Physics, Instruction in 81 

Placement Bureau 45 

Plans of Study for Professions 51 

Prizes 33 

Prizes awarded in 1943-44 92 

Psychology, Instruction in 83 

Publications 50 

Required Courses 24 

Rooms 40 

Scholarships 42 

Corporation, Holders of 1944-45 91 

Sociology, Instruction in 85 

Societies 49 

Spanish, Instruction in 85 

Student Directory 94 

Teaching Fellowships 45 

Telephone Directory 105 

Tuition Charge 40 



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Map of 

HaVERFORD C0LLEX2E 

Grounds 

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KEY TO NUMBERS 



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Founders Hall 

Barclay Hall 

Robeits Hall 

Haverford Union 

Lloyd Hall 

Servants Dormitory 

VVliitall Hall 

Chase Hall 

Observatory 

Morris Infirmary 

Mary Newlin Smith Memorial 

Garden 

The Library 

Lyman Beecher Hall Chemistry 

Laboratory 

The Gymnasium 

Isaac Sharpless Hall (Archeology. 

Biology and Physics) 

Criclcet Pavilion 

Power House 

Walter E. Smith Grand Stand 

Farm Buildings 

Government House 

Merion Hall 

Merion Annex 

Strawbridge Gateway 

Edward B. Conklin Memorial 

Gateway 

Class of 1906 Gateway 

Class of 1912 Gateway 

George Smith Bard Gateway 

Hilles Laboratory of Aupiied 

Science (Engineering) 



30, 
101. 



104. 
105. 

loi;. 

107. 
108, 
109. 
110. 
111. 
112. 
113. 
114. 
115. 
116. 
117. 
118. 
1X9. 
120. 
121. 
122. 
123. 
125. 
120. 
127. 
129. 
130. 



Class of 1905 Gateway 

Messrs. F. C. Evans, Foss. 

Herndon. and Palmer 

Language House. Mr. and Mrs. 

Asensio 

Messrs. Benham. J. A. Kelly. 

and Teaf 

Mr. Williamson 

Mr. Lunt 

.Mr, Rittenhouse 

Mr. Peplnsky 

Government House, Mr. Wylle 

Mr. Post 

President Morley 

Mr. K. M. Jones 

Mr. Macintosh 

Mr. Sargent 

Mr. H. Comfort 

Mr. Lockwood 

Mr. Johnston 

President-Emeritus Comfort 

Mr. Reid and Mr. Caselli 

Mr. Snyder 

Messrs. Cadbury and Green 

Mr. Sutton 

Mr. Watson 

Mr. Wilson 

Mr. Flight 

Mr. Meldrum 

Mr. Steere 

Mr. Oakley 

Science House 



HHVini 


- 


in 

JU 



m 



Report of 
THE TREASURER OF THE CORPORATION 

of HAVERFORD COLLEGE 

1943-44 




VOLUME XLIII 



DECEMBER 
1944 



NUMBER THREE 



issued October, November, December and February by 
Haverford College, Haverford, Pa. 



Second Class Permit Applied For 



HAVERFORD 
COLLEGE 
BULLETIN 



Report of 

TREASURER OF THE CORPORATION 

of Haverford College 

For the Year Ending Eighth Month 31, 1944 




HAVERFORD -PENNSYLVANIA 



CORPORA riON OF HAVERFORD COLLEGE 
Offickrs 

Morris E. I.uds, President. . . 1901 Steiiton Ave., Germantown, Phila. 

Ki i.ix M. MoRi.iv, President of tlie Colletj^e Haverford, Pa. 

f. Hi ^R^ ScAi II Rc.ooi), Treasurer .^ 1616 Walnut St., Phila. 

John Fi.agg Gummerk, Secretary W. School Lane and Fox Ave., Phila. 



Members of the Standing Nominating 
Committee of the Corporation 

Term Expires 19-^5 

William Wistar Comfort Haverford, Pa. 

LovETT Devvees Swcetuater Farm, Glen Mills, Pa. 

Theodore B. Hetzel 768 College Avenue, Haverford, Pa. 



Term Expires 1946 

Harris G. Haviland 16th and Race Sts., Phila. 

Archibald Macintosh 3 College Circle, Haverford, Pa. 

Jon.xthan M. Steere 1318 Girard Trust Bldg., Phila. 



Term Expires 1947 

Stanley R. Yarnall 5337 Knox St., Germantown, Phila. 

IRVIN C. Poley 6012 Chew St., Germantown, Phila. 

Arthur J. Phillips 274 S. Felton St., Phila. 



Board of Managers 

Ex-()[fi(i() as Officers of Corporution 

Morris E. Lffds, President 4901 Stenton Ave., Phila. 

|. HiNRY ScATTF.Rf.ooD, Treasurer 1616 Walnut St., Phila. 

John Flagg Gummere, Secretary W. School Lane and Fox Ave., Phila. 

Term Expires 1945 

Charles J. Rhoads Ithan Road, Bryn Maur, Pa. 

Edward W. Evans 304 Arch St., Phila. 

Wn.i.i AM A. Battev Liberty Trust Building, Phila. 

Dr. Frederic C. Sharpless Rosemont, Pa. 

John A. Silver Olney P. O., Phila. 

Alfred Busselle 347 Madison Ave., New York, N. Y. 

tWALTER C. JANNEY 1529 Walnut St., Phila. 

William B. Bell Rockefeller Plaza, New York, N. Y. 

Term Expires li/to 

Frederic H. Strawbridce 801 Market St., Phila. 

Jonathan M. Steere 1318 Girard Trust Bldg., Phila. 

L. HoLLiNGSwoRTH WooD 103 Park Ave., New York, N. Y. 

Stanley R. Yarnall 5337 Knox St., Germantown, Phila. 

William Wistar Comfort Haverford, Pa. 

Dr. Henry M. Thomas, Jr 1201 N. Calvert St., Baltimore, Md. 

Alexander C. Wood, Jr 511 Chestnut St., Phila. 

Harold Evans 100 Provident Trust Bldg., Phila. 

Term Expires 1947 

J. Stocdell Stokes Summerdale, Phila., Pa. 

M. Albert Lindon 4601 Market St., Phila. 

Francis R. Taylor 901 Girard Trust Bldg., Phila. 

Edward Woolman Haverford, Pa. 

Thomas W. Elkinton 121 S. 3rd St., Phila. 

Dr. S. Emlen Stokes Moorestown, N. J. 

Henry Carter Evans 635 Manatawna Ave., Roxboro, Phila. 

William M. Maier Bailev Building;, Phila. 

Alumni Representatives 

Paul Van Reed Miller Term Expires 1945 Girard Trust Bldg.. Phila. 

Owen B. Rho.\ds Term Expires 1945 Packard Bldg., Phila. 

William Nelson West LIl. Term Expires 1946 1411 Walnut St., Phila. 

John Colvin Wright Term Expires 1947 1 16 E. Penn St., Beaiord, Pa. 

Faculty Representatives 

Term Expires 1945 Term Expires 1946 

Dean P. Lockwood Frank D. Watson 



Chairman of Board Secretary of Board 

Morris E. Leeds William Nelson West, III 



t Deceased, October 11th, 1944. 



Standing Committees of the Board of Managers 
OF THE Corporation of Haverford College 

Executive Comniitlec 

J. Sto(;dell Stokfs, Chairman Walter C. Jannkv * 

J. Henry Scattergood VV. Nelson West, 3rd 

Jonathan M. Steere S. Emlen Stokes 

Alexander C. Wood Thomas W. Elklmon 

Frederic C. Sharpless Paul V. R. Miller 

Cuniniittee ov Finance and Investineiils 

Jonathan M. Steere, Chairman S. Emlen Stokes 
J. Henry Scatiergood M. Albert Linton 

Alf.xander C. Wood John K. GarricuesI 

William B. Bell 

Committee on Audit and Accounts 

William A. Battey, Cliairman Harold Evans 

Francis R. Taylor John F. Gum mere 2 

William M. Maier John Colvin Wrk.ht- 

Committee on College Property and Farm 

Henry C. Evans, Chairman Edward W. Woolma.n 

Frederic H. Strawbriix;e Alfred Busselle 

Thomas W. Elkinton William M. Maier 

William A. Battey Owen B. Rhoads 

John A. Silver 

Committe on Honorary Degrees 

William Wistar Comfort, Chairman 
L. Hollingsworth Wood Stanley R. ^^n all 

Henry M. Thomas Francis R. Taylor 

M. Albert Linton 

Cou nsel 

M\(;C:ov, Briiialn, Evans, and Lewis 
1()32 Clicstiuit Street, IMiiladelplii;! 



* Deceased. October 11. 19 H. 

I lerm Expired: leiuh Month. H)ll. 

:Merin Bej-aii: I eiiili Moiilh. l«)ll. 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 



Felix M. Morley 

A.B., Haverford Colleoe: B.A.. Oxford Universitu: Ph.D.. Brookino' IvKtitutio^ : LL.D.. 
Hamilton College and Univertity of Pennsylvania; Litt.D., George Wa»hington Univertity 

Prt«ident 
Archibald Macintosh 

A.B., Haverford College; M.A., Columbia Univergity 
Vice President, and Director of Admissions 

Thomas C. Gibb 

A.B., Dickinson College; A.M., Haverford College 
Acting Dean 

WiLUAM MiNTZER WiLLS 

A.B., A.M., Haverford College 

Registrar 

Aldo Caselli 

D. S. E. & C. Vniveraity of Navies 
Bursar 

Dean PirrNAM Lockwood 

A.B., A.M., and Ph.D., Harvard Univertity 
Librarian 

Robert J. Johnston * 
Superintendent 

HtRBERT WiLLIA.Vi Ta^I-OR 

A.B., Haverford College; M.D., University of Penntylvanio 

Physician in Charge 

Louis C. Green 

A.B., A.M., and Ph.D., Princeton Univeriity 
Director of the Strawbridge Memorial Observatory 

Thomas Edward Drake 

A.B., Stanford University; M.A., University of Michigan; Ph.D., YaU Univertity 
Curator of the Quaker Collection 

Brinton H. Stone 

A.B., Johns Hopkins University ; M.A., Columbia Univertity 
Assistant to the President 

^ Charles Byles 

Steward 

Amy L. Post 

A.B., Earlham College 
Assistant Librarian 

Mabel S. Beard 

R.N., Lankenau Horpitol 

Resident Nurse 

Mary L. Scaife 

Administrative Secretary 



Deceased. December 1 1. 1911. 



SUMMARY OF THE ACCOUNT OF 

J. HENRY SCATTERGOOD, TREASURER 

OF 

THE CORPORATION OF HAVERFORD COLLEGE 

For the Year Ending Eighth Month 31, 1944 

RECEIPTS 

Income From Funds For General Purposes 

General Endowment Fund $ 4,358.85 

John Farnum Memorial Fund 1,368.13 

John M. Whltall Fund 476.65 

David Scull Fund 2,007.22 

Edward L. Scull Fund 509.09 

Wlstar Morris Memorial Fund 230.45 

Israel Franklin Whltall Fund 483.00 

Jacob P. Jones Endowment Fund 58,298.39 

John Farnum Brown Fund 12,359.62 

Ellen Wain Fund 498.02 

Clementine Cope Endowment Fund 962.86 

Nathan Branson Hill Fund 126.00 

Joseph E. Gillingham Fund 1,899,18 

Henry Norrls Fund 263.68 

Elizabeth H. Farnum Fund 308.35 

James R. Magee Fund 1,987.43 

Albert K. Smiley Fund 67.20 

Hlnchman Astronomical Fund 1,770.20 

W. D. & E. M. L. Scull Fund 7,819.87 

Albln Garrett Memorial Fund 1,199.27 

Arnold Chase Scattergood Memorial Fund 1,092.23 

Frances B. Gummere Memorial Fund 5,625.20 

Isaac Sharpless Memorial Fund 9,798.49 

General Education Board Fund 5,647.93 

William Penn Foundation 4,572.37 

Walter Carrol Brlnton Memorial Fund 632.80 

Corporation Fund 3,584.25 

Elizabeth J. Shortrldge Fund 447.98 

Howard Comfort Memorial Fund 225.21 

Emma Rldgway Comly Fund 2,239.32 

Ellen W. Longstreth Fund 4,784.63 

Albert L. Bally Fund 223.99 

Elizabeth B. Wlstar Warner Fund 221.75 

T. Allen HlUes Bequest 12,577.54 

Leonard L. Grief & Roger L. Grief Fund 44.80 

Edward M. Wlstar Fund 111.99 

Morris E. Leeds Fund 1,833.13 

J. Henry Scattergood Fund 86.76 

Forward 150,743.83 



Forward % 150,743.83 

Income From Fund for T. Wistar Brown 
Graduate Schoo l 

Moses Brown Fund 15,858.04 

Income From Funds for Morris Infirmary 

Infirmary Endowment Fund 432.45 

John W. Pinkham Fund 226.65 659.10 

Income From Fund for Haverford Union 

Haverford Union Fund 84.17 

Income From Funds for Scholarships 

Thomas P. Cope Fund 235.54 

Edward Yarnall Fund 271.89 

Isaiah V. Williamson Fund ' 887.77 

Richard T. Jones Scholarship Fund 226.51 

Mary M. Johnson Scholarship Fund 314.19 

Sarah Marshall Scholarship Fund 354.79 

Clementine Cope Fellowship Fund 1,023.44 

Isaac Thome Johnson Scholarship Fund 362.97 

Caspar Wistar Memorial Fund 132.21 

J. Kennedy Moorhouse Scholarship Fund 230.97 

Louis Jaquette Palmer Scholarship Fund 223.99 

Paul W. Newhall Memorial Scholarship Fund 226.03 

Robert Martin Zuckert Memorial Scholarship Fund 719.72 

Samuel E. Hilles Scholarship Fund 224.76 

Class of 1913 Scholarship Fund 134.39 

Class of 1917 Scholarship Fund 121.35 

Daniel B. Smith Fund 106.55 

Sarah Tatum Hilles Memorial Scholarship Fund 2,926.50 

Elihu Grant Memorial Scholarship Fund 36.42 8,759.99 

Income From Funds for Library 

Alumni Library Fund 781.05 

Mary Farnum Brown Library Fund 2,995.10 

William H. Jenks Library Funds 223.99 

Mary Wistar Brown Williams Library Fund 909.69 

Anna Yarnall Fund 7,716.17 

F. B. Gummere Library Fund 28.47 

Edmund Morris Fergusson, Jr. Memorial Fund 44.90 

Class of 1888 Library Fund 261.49 

Class of 1918 Library Fund 56.16 13,017.02 

Income From Funds for Old Style Pensions 

President Sharpless Fund 1,847.32 

William P. Henzey Fund 1,646.70 

Jacob P. Jones Benefit Fund 3,051 .32 

Pliny Earle Chase Memorial Fund 146.59 

Haverford College Pension Fund 5,019.14 11,711.07 

Forward ' 200,833.22 



Forward $200,833.22 

Income From Funds for Special Purposes 

Thomas Shipley Fund 235.10 

EUiston P. Morris Fund 50.48 

John B. Garrett Reading Prize Fund 101.79 

Special Endowment Fund 413.35 

Scholarship Improvement Prize Fund '. 102.89 

Elizabeth P. Smith Fund 78.13 

S. P. Lippincott History Prize Fund 114.09 

Francis Stokes Fund 229,38 

George Peirce Prize Fund 97.56 

Lyman Beecher Hall Prize Fund 96.54 

Newton Prize Fund 62.62 

Edward B. Conklin Athletic Fund 107.51 

Arboretum Fund 205.52 

William Ellis Scull Prize Fund 89.60 

Paul D. I. Maier Fund 44.80 

Strawbridge Observatory Maintenance Fund 172.00 

Jacob & Eugenie Bucky Memorial Foundation 97.13 

Mathematics Department Prize Fund 44.31 2,342.80 

Income from the funds for the College 203,176.02 

Income from Special Trust 

Augustus Taber Murray Research Scholarship Fund 1,050.66 

t 
Total Income from All Funds 204,226.68 

Income from College Sources 

From Regular Students 

Tuition - Cash 37,930.42 

Scholarships Donated 2,538.00 

Scholarships from Funds 12,116.15 52.584.57 

Board - Cash 27,931.48 

Donated 296.00 28,227.48 

Room Rents 13,441.68 

Re-examination Fees 178.00 

Miscellaneous Fees 435.80 

Board of Professors 3,263.99 

Rentals 13,574.54 

Infirmary 306.39 

Library 1,434.23 

Biological Laboratory 805.40 

Chemical Laboratory 2,420.35 

Physics Laboratory 1,454.83 

Engineering Laboratory 994.25 

Observatory 11.94 

Mathematics 18.27 119,151.72 

Accelerated Summer Term 1943, Completed 

Additional Receipts in 1943-44 

Tuition - Cash 844.95 

Scholarships Donated 140.00 984.95 

Board 780.00 

Room Rents 401.99 2,166.94 

Forward 325,545.34 



Forward $325,545.34 

Reconstruction and Relief Unit 

Tuition 7,633.75 

Board 5,748.00 

Room Rents 1,957.50 

Donations Applied 813.72 16,152.97 

Premeteorological Unit, Completed 

(Government audit not yet completed) 
Additional from Government 

Activating Costs 1,368.15 

Use of Facilities 9,982.95 

Instruction 59,276.86 

Add Transfers 526.11 59,802.97 

Medical 1,677.69 

Subsistence 38,437.07 

Maintenance & Operation 11,657.35 

(With receipts of last year $144,237.32 

this makes grand total of $267,163.50) 122,926.18 

From the Government for Use of Facilities 
and Depreciation 

Premeteorological Unit 19,544.27 

A. S. T. P. Units 14,630.40 34,174.67 

Accelerated Summer Term 1944, Uncompleted 

Tuition - Cash 9,926.00 

Scholarships Donated 390.50 

Scholarships from Funds 2,310.00 12,626.50 

Board 6,837.00 

Room Rents 3,557.53 

Fees for use of Swimming Pool 185.50 23,206.53 

Army Specialized Training Prc^ram (Uncompleted) 

From the Government: 

Activating Costs 6,347.83 

Use of Facilities 10,626.90 

Instruction 59,084.12 

Medical 5,013.31 

Subsistence 55,906.15 

Maintenance and Operation 18,609.10 

Books 4,452.35 

Sale of Material 1.75 160.041.51 

Donations other than for Fimds 

Income from Executor for 

Sarah Tatum Hilles Memorial Fund 339.99 

For Prizes - Class of 1902 Prize for Latin 9.00 

For Library - Matzke Royalties 32.45 

Minor Library Donations 66.60 

Library Associates . 1,004.00 

For London Times 25.00 1,128.05 



Forward 1,477.04 682.047.20 



10 



Forward $682,047.20 

Donations other than for Funds (continued) 

Forward 1.477.04 

Carnegie Gift for Music 

Miscellaneous Collections 50.50 

For Italian Understanding 100.00 

For Campus Club 199.05 

For Care of Cope Field 50.00 

For Radio Club - interest added 59.84 

For Electronomics Equipment 2,500.00 

For Engineering Equipment 150.00 

For Chemical Laboratory Equipment 25.00 

For General Purposes 10.00 

For Emergency Aid to Professors 20.00 

For Field House 1,391.75 

For Undesignated Purpose - Class of 1928 37.50 

For Faculty Salaries 450.00 

For Administrative Salaries 770.00 

For Reconstruction and Relief 800.00 

For Scholarships 

Anonymous 40.00 

Anonymous 200.00 

Anonymous 600.00 

Anonymous 1,000.00 

E. M. Cook 150.00 

Wyomissing Foundation 600.00 

Jansen Foundation 300.00 

Board of Methodist Church 100.00 

Guggenheim Foundation 200.00 

Mrs. Wm. H. Collins 296.00 3,486.00 

For Triangle Society Gift 122.96 

For Triangle Society Gift - Pew Gift * 75.00 197.96 

For New Library Addition 15.00 11,789.64 

Additions to the Funds 

Junes R. Magee Fund - from Executor 449.89 

Centenary Fund - donated 50.00 

Ellen W. Longstreth Fund - realized on legacy 258.00 

J. Henry Scattergood Fund - donated 340.00 

Moses Brown Fund - Income transferred 1,585.80 

Isaac Thorne Johnson Fund - Income transferred 362.97 

Robert Martin Zuckert Fund - donated 1,000.00 

Class of 1917 Scholarship Fund - donated 657.50 

Daniel B. Smith Fund (new) - donated 2,500.00 

Sarah Tatum Hilles Mem. Scholarship Fund (new) -bequest 75,534.58 

Elihu Grant Memorial Scholarship Fund (new) - donated 2,078.73 

Mary Farnum Brown Library Fund - Income transferred 325.53 

Class of 1888 Library Fund - donated 100.00 

George Peirce Prize Fund - Income transferred 97,56 

Mathematics Department Prize Fund - Income transferred .... 19.31 

Mathematics Department Prize Fund - donated 125.00 85,484.87 

Reduction of Funds 

Transfer to Corporation for debt 

balance of Centenary Fund 281.06 

Forward 779,602.77 

♦The above is a dividend of $75.00 on 150 shares of Sun Oil Stock, 
valued at 57-1/8, making $8,568.75 donated by Joseph N. Pew, Jr. for 
social, economic and historical research. 

11 



Forward $779,602.77 

Miscellaneous Receipts 

Net Receipts from Skating Pond 640.59 

Insurance Collected - on books lost in fire 19.00 

Griffin Lane Advances returned 1,452.89 

Student Reimbursement Insurance 455.00 

Student Store - on account of loans 759.15 

Student Activities Account - fees collected 1,716.93 

Language House Alterations - reserve applied 511.87 

Kitchen Improvements - reserve applied 2,501.03 

Government Taxes withheld 52,344.99 60,401.45* 

Items relating to other Years 

Old Bill Collected 80.00 

Coal for 1943-44, bought in advance applied ^ 1,374.68 

Reserve for Government Contract 

Premeteorology Unit 16,200.26 

Prepaid Insurance applied 2,543.32 20,198.26 

Investments Realized 

Consolidated Investments Account 

Bonds - Government 9,485.18 

Industrial 1,025.00 

Public Utility 34,590.82 

Railroad 313,560.14 358,661.14 

Stocks - Preferred 

Public Utility 21,265.39 

Railroad 15,903.84 37,169.23 

Stocks - Common 

Industrial 34,604.08 

Public Utility 41,233.19 

Railroad 1,129.01 

Miscellaneous 51.65 77,017.93 

Mortgages - Received on a/c 85,747.14 

Real Estate 

Sold 54,036.63 

Sundry receipts 544.35 54,580.98 

Miscellaneous 799.07 613,975.49 

John Farnum Memorial Fund 3,067.22 

Nathan Branson Hill Fund 

(First Bank & Trust Co. of Minneapolis, Trustee) 
(Entered short) $11.50 
Elizabeth H. Farnum Fund 

(Provident Trust Co. Trustee) 
(Entered short) $1525. 

Ellen W. Longstreth Agency a/c 568.04 

Ellen W. Longstreth-Mary Pearsall Agency a/c 344.52 617,955.27 

Money Borrowed Temporarily 46,000.00 

Balances 9th Month 1, 1943: 

In Treasurer's Account 125,890.21 

In President's Account 54,539.77 180,429.98 



$1,704,587.73 



"Note: The United States Office of Education has conducted 
Engineering and Management Defense Training at the 
College to an amount of $7,866.65 net for 1942-43 
and $7,352.77 net for 1943-44. 

12 



EXPENDITURES 
1943 - 1944 
Expenses of Running the College 

Salaries - Instruction 145,043.97 

Library 13,185.19 

Administration & General 22,882.80 181,111.96 

Pension Contributions 3,320.26 

Wages - Power Plant 2,972.30 

Residence Halls 17,813.63 

Dining Room & Kitchen 9,072.82 29,858.75 

Provisions 18,684.53 

Family Expenses & Furniture 10,552.74 

Educational Miscellaneous 4,114.42 

Fuel and Light 7,333.90 

Water 1,429.34 

Lawn L Garden 3,517.33 

Infirmary 1,757.81 

Haverford Union 2.50 

Library 2,261.18 

Biological Laboratory 741.82 

Chemical Laboratory 2,376.15 

Physics Laboratory 1,490.94 

Engineering Laboratory 975.99 

Music Department 34.55 

Observatory 2.06 

Gynmasiimi and Athletics 3,432.75 

Printing and Advertising 2,429.27 

Haverford Re\new 962.93 

Entertainment Expense 840.23 

Repairs and Improvements 15,561.65 

Interest 5,094.16 

Taxes 1,866.32 

Insurance 5,328.82 

Secretary and Treasurer's Expenses 4,325.75 

Auditing Expense 550.00 

Contribution to Haverford Meeting 100.00 4,975.75 

Contribution to American Academy at Rome . . . 50.00 

Contribution to American School at Athens . . . 25.00 

Contribution to School of Oriental Research, 

Jerusalem 25.00 100.00 

Rentals - W. D. & E. M. L. Scull Fund 340.00 

Government House 2,400.00 

Language House 1,200.00 

Science House 700.00 

♦ 1 College Circle 1,200.00 5,840.00 

Regular Expanses of Running the College 

(Apart from uncompleted Accelerated Summer Term 
1944, and A.S.T.P. Army Unit, uncompleted.) 

Add 



315,998.11 



Stork Art Gift, shortage of income to meet interest charge . . . 999.00 

Third 1/6 cost of Language House Alterations 511.87 

Third 1/6 cost of Kitchen Alterations 2 501.03 

Old Style Pensions - professors 20,231.61 

Employee Pensions 1,625.00 

Annuity 1,600.00 

Expense of College for Regular Students, (forward) 

13 



27,468.51 
343,466.62 



Forward $343,466.62 

Accelerated Siunmer Term 1943, completed 
(Additional net expenses as follows:) 

Salaries - Faculty 7,181.93 

Library 453.75 

Administrative 550.00 8,185.68 

Wages - Power Plant 197.70 

Residence Halls 556.50 

Dining Room & Kitchen 1,035.46 1,789.66 

Provisions 1,618.50 

Family Expenses and Furniture 30.28 

Fuel and Light 815.50 

Water 126.67 

Infirmary 72.95 

Lawn and Garden 98.71 

Gymnasium and Athletics 70.06 

Printing and Advertising 24.50 

Repairs and Improvements 541.66 13,374.17 

(Deducting these from the balance carried over from 
1942-43 and the receipts collected in 1943-44 leaves 
a final credit balance of $10,554.54) 

Reconstruction and Relief Unit 

Faculty Salaries 6,878.33 

Other Salaries and Wages 1,595.84 

Supplies 15.24 

Travel Expense 97.26 8,586.67 

Premeteorological Unit, Completed 

Activating Costs 7,845.96 

Obstacle Course transferred from 

previous separate item 334.66 8,180.62 

Use of Facilities, transferred to 

separate account 19,544.27 

Instruction 

Salaries 49,624.54 

Administrative Salaries 3,812.50 

Books 1,176.90 

Educational Miscellaneous 1,761.85 

Biology Laboratory 170.43 

Physics Laboratory 40.50 56,586.72 

Medical 937.96 

Subsistence 

Provisions 26,473.56 

Dining Room and Kitchen Wages .. 7,282.53 33,756.09 
Maintenance and Operation 

Residence Hall Wages 4,287.89 

Family Expenses and Furniture . . -326.88 

Fuel and Light 4,409.51 

Power House Wages 1,287.78 

Water 807.25 

Lawn and Garden 770.66 

Gymnasium and Athletics -26.56 

Forward 11,209.65 119,005.66 365,427.46 



14 



Forward $365,427.46 

Premeteorological Unit, Completed (continued) 

Forward 11,209.65 119,005.66 

Printing and Advertising -64.75 

Repairs and Improvements 3,293.84 

Obstacle Course 

transfer as above to 

Activating Costs -334.66 14,104.08 133,109.74 

Reserve - pending negotiation of 

termination of contract 16,200.26 149,310.00 

(With expenditures of last year $117 852.50 
this makes a grand total of $250,963.24) 

Accelerated Summer Term 1944, Uncompleted 

Salaries - Faculty 11,456.93 

Library 121.40 11,578.33 

Less - Administrative 52.99 11,525.34 

Wages - Power Plant 578.15 

Residence Halls 1,014.66 

Dining Room and Kitchen 2,265.86 3,858,67 

Provisions 1,419.87 

Family Expenses and Furniture 42.33 

Fuel and Light 802.46 

Infirmary 251.81 

Library 94.14 

Repairs and Improvements 71.30 

Swimming Pool Expense 225.00 18,290.92 

(Credit balance Accelerated Summer Term 
1944 carried forward - $4,915.61) 

Army Specialized Training Program (Uncompleted) 

Activating Costs 7,095.04 

Use of Facilities 10,626.90 

Instruction - Salaries (instructional 

and supervisory) 66,621.98 

Books 5,468.65 

Freight on Books 101.94 

Expendables (Educational Misc. & 

Laboratory a/c's) 1,775.28 7,345.87 

Depreciation of Equipment 1,600.95 

Physical Education 453.58 

Library 955.56 76,977.94 

Medical 6,452.93 

Subsistence - Provisions 38,531.58 

Supplies 4,025.39 

Wages 12,20<^.38 

Depreciation of Dining 

Room Equipment 1,270.83 56,036.18 

Maintenance and Operation 

Repairs & Improvements - Supplies .... 1,291.89 
Salary - Wages - Repairs & 

Improvements 7,003.37 

Janitors 5,255.68 

Lawn & Garden 1,822.88 

Supervisory 1,306.54 

Forward 16,680.36 157,188.99 533,028.38 



15 



Forward 

Army Specialized T ra ining Pr o gram (Uncompleted) (continued) 

Forward $16,680.36 157,188.99 

Utilities - Electricity 1,536.08 

Water 741.10 

Heat Salaries 2,758.49 

Coal 5,406.30 

Repairs 329.63 

Supplies Family Expense & Furniture . . 807.40 

Telephone 40.22 

Laundry and dry cleaning 127.44 

Physical Education 2,804.97 

Insurance 359.61 

Depreciation 217.10 31,808.70 

Reserve for Further Negotiation 800.00 

(Debit balance Army Specialized Training 
Program carried forward - $29,756.18) 

Expenditures from Income of Funds 
for Scholarships & Fellowships 

General Endowment Fund 1,025.00 

Jacob P. Jones Endowment Fund 6,822.60 

Joseph E. Gillingham Fund 600.00 

Moses Brown Fund - at Haverford 2,250.00 

at Pendle Hill 350.00 

Thomas P. Cope Fund 225.00 

Edward Yarnall Fund 435.00 

Isaiah V. Williamson Fund 850.00 

Mary M. Johnson Scholarship Fund 300.00 

Sarah Marshall Scholarship Fund 450.00 

Caspar Wistar Memorial Fund 100.00 

Robert Martin Zuckert Memorial Scholarship Fund 950.00 

Samuel E. Hilles Scholarship Fund 325.00 

Class of 1913 Scholarship Fund 23.55 14,706.15 



$533,028.38 



189,797.69 



Expenditures from Income of Special Trust 

Augustus Taber Murray Research Scholarship Fund 



980.00 



Expenditures from Income of Funds for Library 

W. D. & E.M.L. Scull Fund 181.87 

Ellen W. Longstreth Fund Quakeriana Books . . 294.58 
Mary Farnum Brown Library Fund 

Books - General 2,243.71 

Books - Christian Knowledge 287.06 

Speaker 138.80 

William H. Jenks Library Fund - Books 74.40 

Mary Wistar Brown Williams Library Fund-Books 303.05 

Anna Yarnall Fund - Books 2,289.62 

F. B. Gummere Library Fund - Books 43.10 

Edmund Morris Fergusson, Jr. Memorial 

Fund - Books 54.06 

Class of 1918 Library Fund - Books 85.43 5,995.68 

Forward 21,681.83 722,826.07 



16 



Forward 



$21,681.83 $722,826.07 



Expenditures from Income of Special Funds 



Thomas Shipley Fund - Lecture and Special 

Enterprises 244.81 

Elliston P. Morris Fund Books 24.26 

Special Endowment Fund 

Friends' Council on Education 25.00 

Religious Education Committee 200.00 

Scholarship Improvement Prize Fund - Prizes . 95.00 

S. P. Lippincott History Prize Fund Books . . . 14.36 

Francis Stokes Fund - for Campus Club work . . 8.18 

Newton Prize Fund Prize 50.00 

William Ellis Scull Fund Prizes 60.00 

Paul D. I. Maier Fund Prizes 20.00 

Strawbridge Observatory Maintenance Fund . . . 163.85 

Jacob & Eugenie Bucky Memorial Foundation . . 97.13 

Mathematics Department Prize Fund - Prizes . 25.00 



1.027.59 22,709.42 



Spent from Donations 



For Library 

Books from Matzke royalties 23.36 

Books from Carnegie Corporation Gift 67.17 

Books from Dr. Arthur's Gift 76.79 

Books from Minor Library donations 90.95 

Books from Library Associates 185.44 

Binding of Dr. Jones' Library 98.20 541.91 

For Music from Carnegie Corporation Gift 3,304.09 

For Campus Club's work 199.05 

For Chemical Laboratory Equipment 1,301.01 

For Emergency Aid to Professors 19.96 

For Field House - Invested in U.S. Bonds 1,298.00 

From Bucky Foundation Gift 
Reconstruction and Relief Scholarship .... 300.00 

Reconstruction and Relief Miscellaneous ... , 228.53 

Books 196.20 

Equipment and Supplies for its Office 82.43 

807.16 
Less Income Bucky Foundation Fund used . . . 97.13 710.03 

For Premeteorological Unit Award 25.00 

For Lecture on Finland 74.00 

For Care of Cope Field 95.00 

For Reconstruction and Relief, balance of 

Wyomissing and Janssen Foundation Gifts 13.72 

For Furnishing Government House, balance of 

Gift of National Foundation for Education 22.96 

For Reconstruction and Relief 800.00 

For Scholarships - from Alvord Foundation 

Gift o 450.0C 

For Scholarships - 

Anonymous for Summer Term 220.00 

Anonymous for Special Scholarships 988.00 

From Gift of Wyomissing and Janssen 

Foundations 770.50 

From Gift of Board of Education 

Methodist Church 100.00 

From Anonymous Gift 200.00 

From Gift of Guggenheim Foundation 200.00 

From Gift of Mrs. W. H. Collins 296.00 3,224.50 

Forward 11,629.23 



745,535.49 



17 



Forward $745,535.49 

Spent from Donations (continued) 

Forward 11,629.23 

Balance of Beth Shemesh Fund transferred to 

start Elihu Grant Memorial Fund 803.73 

Balance of Class of 1917 Gift for Scholarship 

transferred to Principal of Fund 142.50 

From Triangle Society Gift (1) 

For William Henry Chamberlin 

lecture expense 947.58 

Toward Rent in Sharpless House 310.00 

For Collection Speakers' Expense 278.65 

For Association of College Presidents 200.00 

For Army Fund (Special P.M.) 210.41 

For Government House Maintenance 91.93 

For Model League of Nations, Delegates 25.00 

For Government Conference, Travel 54.00 

For Haverford News 50.00 

For A.S.T.P. Entertaining 14.00 

For Entertaining visiting professor 12.50 

For Two Engraved Plates 18.26 

For Special Equipment Dining Room 67.55 2,279.88 

From Triangle Society Gift (2) Pew Gift 

Salaries for Special Research Work 1,320.00 

Salary for Reconstruction & Relief 100.00 

Allowance for Gov't. Contract Work &00.00 

Educational Misc. to reduce its cost 500.00 

Travel Expenses, sundry persons 416.59 

Entertainment A.S.T.P 15.50 

United Nations Information Bureau 1.00 

Col. Beukema Testimonial 4.91 

Books & Magazines 34.70 

Telegrams & Phones 10.79 2,903.49 17,758.83 

For New Construction 

Library Addition, completed 

(from M.E. Leeds' gift) (Final cost $126,963.18) 31.98 

Library Quakeriana Room, completed 

(from M.E. Leeds' gift) (Final cost $28,360.94^ 24.75 56.73 

Principal of Centenary Fund 

Transferred to Corporation on a/c debt 281.06 

Miscellaneous Expenditures 

Books lost in fire at Haverford School 19.00 

Advances made to Griffin Lane Apartments 675.10 

Student Reimbursement Insurance 494.00 

Haverford Student's Store - advances made 79.17 

Student Activities Account 

Debating 164.90 

Athletic Association 245.00 

Cap and Bells 122.50 

Haverford News 399.13 

Student Association 85.50 

Radio Club 161.00 

Class Book 26.25 1,204.28 

Withholding Taxes withheld and paid 47,921.01 50,392.56 

Forward ai4,024.67 



r 



Forward $814,024.67 

Items Relating to other Fiscal Years 

Reserve for Receipts in Advance 2,689.22 

Advances to be Refunded 496.99 

Insurance prepaid 3,863.41 

Expenses for following year - Griffin Lane 207.99 

Room Rents received in advance applied 120.00 

Coal bought in advance for 1944-45 4,878.20 12,255.81 

Investments Made 

Consolidated Investments Account 

Bonds - Government 125^046.88 

. Industrial 4,907.25 

Public Utility 34,406.25 

Railroad 22,327.66 186,688.04 

Preferred Stocks - 

Public Utility 24,272.03 

Common Stocks - 

Bank & Insurance 36,029.98 

Industrial 312,572.20 

Public Utility 100,734.11 

Railroad 37,281.47 486,617.76 

Mortgages 21,900.00 

Real Estate - Charges to Principal 143.50 719,621.33 

Ellen W. Longstreth - Mary Pearsall 

Agency a/c 148.43 

Anna Yarnal Agency a/c .50 719,770.26 

Income transferred to Principal 

Moses Brown Fund 1,585.80 

Isaac Thorne Johnson Fund 362.97 

Mary Farnum Brown Library Fund 325.53 

George Peirce Prize Fund 97.56 

Mathematics Department Prize Fund 19.31 2,391.17 

Money Borrowed Temporarily 

Paid off in full 46,000.00 

Balances 8th Month 1, 1944 

In Treasurer's Account 94,632.64 

In President's Account 15,513.18 110,145.82 

$1,704,587.73 



19 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 



For the Year Ending 8th Month 31, 1944 

Net Cash Receipts at College 

As per foregoing statement: 

(a) For regular students $119,151.72 

Less Tuition and Board provided 

by Scholarships 

From Funds $12,046.15 

From Donations 2,834.00 14,880.15 $104,271.57 

(b) Accelerated Summer Term 1934, completed 

Receipts 1942-43 (see last year's report). . . 35,772.53 

Receipts 1943-1944 2,166.94 37,939.47 

(c) Reconstruction and Relief Unit 16,152.97 

(d) Premeteorological Unit, completed 
Received from Government 1942-43 

(see last year's report) 144,237.32 

Received from Government 1943-44 122,926.18 267,163.50 

(e) Received from Government for ♦ 

Use of Facilities 

Premeteorological Unit 19,544.27 

A. S. T. P. Units 14,630.40 34,174.67 $459,702.18 

Income from Funds, Donations, etc . 

(Applicable to Operatii^ Account after 

capitalizing and special purposes) 
Income from Funds 186,642.42 

Less income used for Scholarships 

1944 Accelerated Summer Term 2,310.00 184,332.42 

Donations for Scholarships 2,834.00 

Donations for Salaries and general purposes . . . 1,230.00 188,396.42 



648,098.60 



Expenses of Running the College 

(a) Regular Expenses as per foregoing statement 315,998.11 
Add: 

Stork Art Gift, interest on overdraft not 

covered by income 999.00 

Third 1/6 cost of Alterations to Language 

House 511.87 

Third 1/6 cost of Kitchpn Alterations 2,501.03 

Old Style Pensions to Retired Faculty 20,231.61 

Employee Pensions 1,625.00 

Annuity 1,600.00 

(b) Accelerated Summer Term 1943 completed 

Spent 1942-43 (see last year's report) 14,010.76 

Spent 1943-44 13,374.17 

(c) Reconstruction and Relief Unit 

(d) Premeteorological Unit, complpted 

Spent 1942-43 (see last year's report) 117,853.50 

Spent 1943 44 133,109.74 

Reserve for negotiation of termination of 

contract 16,200.26 



343,466.62 



27,384.93 
8,586.67 



267,163.50 646,601.72 



Operating Gain for 1943-44 



$ 1,496.88 



20 



STATEMENT OF DEBT OF THE CORPORATION 
8th Month 31, 1944 

Debt of the Corporation 9th Month 1, 1943 106,476.80 

Decreased during the year" - 

By Old Bill collected 80.00 
By Donations for deficit on Library 

New Stack Addition 15.00 

By use of Balance of Centenary Fund 281.06 

By Operating Gain 1943-44 1,496.88 1,872.94 

Debt 8th Month 31, 1944 $ 104,603.86 



Incurred as follows: - 

Accumulated deficits 24,772.16 

Campus Dwellings (not covered by Donations) 

#1 College Circle 14,689.98 

#3 College Circle 9,616.17 

#4 College Circle 10,938.46 

#5 College Circle 8,717.69 

791 College Avenue (Sharpless House) 14,412.29 

781 College Avenue (formerly Babbitt House) 8,203.41 

521 Panmure Road (Science House) 13,253.70 79,831.70 

$104,603.86 



Note: - The Investment of the Funds in College Lane 
Real Estate and eight dwellings remains the 
same, being $201,500. in Consolidated Invest- 
ments Account. 



21 



REPORT ON FUNDS 



PRINCIPAL 



INCOME 



Book Value 9/1/43 



Increased Decreased 



Book Value 8/3l/im 



Balance 
9/1/113 



Net 
Income 



Used for 
Col lege Expenses 



Special Expenditures 



Balance" 
3/31/M 



Funds for General Purposes 

General Endowment Fund $ 93,753.86 

John Farnuni Memorial Fund 3H,994.92 

John II. Whitall Fund 10,252.18 

Cavid Scull Fund 43,173.01* 

Edward L. Scull Fund 10,950.03 

yistar Morris Memorial Fund 1,956.69 

Israel Frankl in Wh ital I Fund 10,388.86 

Jacob P. Jones Endowment Fund' 1,253,930.25 

John Farnum Brown Memorial Fund 265,841.10 

Ellen Wain Fund 10,711.80 

Clementine Cope Endowment Fund 20,710.06 

Nathan Branson Hill Fund 5,097.41 

Joseph E. Gill ingham Fund 40,849.10 

Henry Sorris Fund 5,671.42 

Elizabeth H. Farnum Fund 9,624.66 

James R. Magee Fund 42,559.81 

Albert K. Smiley Fund 1,445.31 

Hinchman Astronomical Fund 38,074.84 

W. D. S E. M. L. Scull Fund 168,196.24 

Albin Garrett Memorial Fund 25,795.00 

Arnold Chase Scattergood Fund 23,492.69 

Francis B. Gummere Memor iai Fund 120,991.54 

Isaac Sharpless Memorial Fund 210,754.11 

General Education Fund 121,480.36 

Centenary Fund 231.06 

William Penn Foundation 98,346.29 

Walter Carroll Brinton Memorial Fund 13,610.80 

Corporation Fund 77,093.02 

Elizabeth J. Shortridge Fund 9,635.43 

Howard Comfort Memorial Fund 4,844.02 

Emma Ridgway Comly Fund 48,165.07 

Ellen W. Longstreth Fund 

In Consolidated a/c 

E. W. Longstreth Agency a/c .' 

Mary Pearsall Agency a/c 

Albert L. Baily Fund 

Elizabeth B. Wistar Warner Fund 

T. Allen Hilles Bequest 

Leonard L. Greif, Jr. & Roger L. Greif.Fund ... 

Edward M. Wistar Fund 

Morris E. Leeds Fund 

J. Henry Scattergood Fund 

Funds for Wistar Brown Graduate School 

Moses Brown Fund 

Funds for Morris Infirmary 

Infirmary Endowment Fund 

John W. Pinkham Fund 

Fund for Haverford Union 

Haverford Union Fund 

Funds for Scholarships 

Thomas P. Cope Fund 

Edward Yarnal I Fund 

Isaiah V. Williamson Fund 

Forward * 



341,087.90 



9,301.50 
4,875.05 



1,810.33 



5,066.13 
5,847.96 
9,094.90 



415.74 



449.89 



50.00 $ 281.06 



98,393.75 

1,578.04 

6,228.32 

4,817.71 

4,769.54 

270,528.30 

963.54 

2,408.86 
39,428.52 

1,639.41 3,256,376.96 



341,087.90 

14,176.55 
1,810.33 



1,033.72 
I 1.59 



340.00 



1,585.80 



11.59 

1,564.00 

359.61 



93,753.86 

35,410.66 

10,252.18 

43,173.04 

10,950.03 

4,956.69 

10,388.86 

1,253,930.25 

265,841.10 

10,711.80 

20,710.06 

5,097.41 

40,349.10 

5,671.42 

9,624.66 

43,009.70 

1,445.31 

38,074.84 

168,196.24 

25,795.00 

23,492.69 

120,991.54 

2 1 0, 754 . 1 1 

121,480.36 

98,346.29 
13,610.80 
77,093.02 

9,635.43 

4,844.02 
48,165.07 

99,415.88 

14.04 

5,880.30 

4,817.71 

4,769.54 

270,528.30 

963,54 

2,408.86 

39,428.52 

1.979.41 3,256,461.64 



$ 4,358.85 $ 3,333.85 $ I ,025.00 Scholarsh ips 



$ 500.00 



342,673.70 342,673.70 



9,301.50 

4.875.05 14,176.55 



1,810.33 1,810.33 



5,066.13 
5,847.96 
19,094.90 



,368.13 

476.65 

2,007.22 

509.09 

230.45 

483.00 

58,298.39 

12,359.62 

498.02 

962.86 

126.00 

1,899.18 

263.68 

308.35 

1,987.43 

67.20 

1,770.20 

7,819.87 

1,199.27 

1,092.23 

5,625.20 

9,798.49 

5,647.93 

4,572.37 
632.80 

3,584.25 
447.98 
225.21 

2,239.32 

4,784.63 



223.99 

221.75 

12,577.54 

44.80 

111.99 

1,833.13 



86.76 



432.45 
226.65 



84.17 



30.52 


235.54 


356.75 


271.89 


313.19 


887.77 



1,368.13 

476.65 

2,007.22 

509.09 

230.45 

483.00 

51,475.79 

12,359.62 

498.02 

962.86 

126.00 

1,299.18 

263.68 

308.35 

1,987.43 

67.20 

1,770.20 

7,298.00 

1,199.27 

1,092.23 

5,625.20 

9,798.49 

5,647.93 

4,572.37 
632.80 

3,584.25 
447.98 
225.21 

2,239.32 

4,490.05 



223.99 

221.75 

12,577.54 

44.80 

111.99 

1,833.13 



86.76 



15,858.04 11,572.24 



432.45 
226.65 



84.17 



6,822.60 Scholarships 



600.00 Scholarships 



M8I .87 Books 
1340.00 Rent 



$500.00 



294.58 Books 



2,600.00 Scholarships 

100.00 Appropriations 
1 ,585.80 Capital ized 



225.00 Scholarships 
435.00 Scholarships 
850.00 Scholarships 



1*1.06 
193.61 
350J6 



30,008.99 $3,613,451.74 *3,886.74 $2,216.26 $ 30,008.99 $3,615,122.22 $1,200.46 $l68,/40.34 $153,795.29 $15,059.85 



$1,085.66 



22 



RFPORT ON FUHDS (Continued) 



Forward 

Funds for Scholarships (continued) 

Forward "^TTTTTTTTTT. 1 

Richard T. Jones Scholarship Fund 

Mary M. Johnson Scholarship Fund 

Sarah Marshall Scholarship Fund 

Clementine Cope Fellowship Fund 

Isaac Thorne Johnson Scholarship Fund 

Caspar Wistar Memorial Fund 

J. Kennedy Moorhouse Scholarship Fund 

Louis Jaquette Palmer Scholarship Fund 

Paul W. Newhall Memorial Scholarship Fund 

Robert Martin Zuckert Mem. Scholarship Fund ... 

Samuel £. Hilles Scholarship Fund 

Class of 1913 Scholarship Fund 

Class of 1917 Scholarship Fund 

Daniel B. Smith Fund 

Sarah Tatum Hilles Memorial Scholarship Fund .. 
Elihu Grant Memorial Scholarship Fund 

Augustus Taber Murray Research Scholarship Fund 

Funds for the Library 

Alumni Library Fund 

Mary Farnum Browa Library Fund 

William H. Jenks Library Fund 

Mary Wistar Brown Williams Library Fund 

Anna Yarnall Fund 

In Consolidated a/c 

Agency a/c 

F. B. Guimiere Library Fund 

Edmund Morris Fergusson, Jr. Memorial Fuird .... 

Class of 1888 Library Fund 

Class of 1918 Library Fund 

Funds for Old Style Pensions 

President Sharpless Fund 

William P. Henszey Fund 

Jacob P. Jones Benefit Fund 

Pliny Earle Chase Memorial Fund 

Haverford College Pension Fund 

Funds for Special Purposes 

Thomas Shipley Fund 

Elliston P. Morris Fund 

John B. Garrett Reading Prize Fund 

Special Endownent Fund 

Scholarship Improvement Prize Fund 

Elizabeth P. Smith Fund 

S. P. Lippincott History Prize Fund 

Francis Stokes Fund 

George Pe'irce Prize Fund 

Lyman Beecher Hall Prize Fund 

Newton Prize Fund 

Edward B. Conklin Athletic Fund 

Arboretum Fund 

William Ellis Scull Prize Fund 

Paul D. I. Maier Fund 

Strawbridge Observatory Maintenance Fund 

Jacob i Eugenie Bucky Memorial Foundation 

Mathematics Department Prize Fund 









PRINCIPAL 










INCOME 




















Balance 


Net 


Used for 






Balance 
8/31/44 


Book Value 9/1/43 




Increased 


Decreased 


Book Value 8/31/44 


9/1/43 


Income College Expenses Special 


Expend! tures 




$3,613,451 


.74 


$3,886.74 


$2,216.26 




$3,615,122.22 


$1,200.46 


$168,740.34 


$153,795.29 


$15,059.85 




$1,085.66 


$30,008.99 










$30,008.99 
















'*,87l.92 










4,871.52 




162.62 


226.51 










6,757.92 

7,631.02 

22,012.96 










6,757.92 

7,631.02 

22,012.96 




120.32 

174.97 

1,539.74 


314.19 

354.79 

1,023.44 




300.00 
450.00 


Schol arsh i ps 
Scholarsh ips 


134.51 

79.76 

2,563.18 


7,807.1 1 






362.97 




8,170.08 






362.97 




362.97 


Capi tal i zed 


2,843.61 
4.967.88 










2,843.61 
4,967.88 




173.07 
57.91 


132.21 
230.97 




100.00 


Scholarships 


205.28 
288.88 
280.43 
382.25 
182.89 
22 50 


4,817.71 










4,817.71 




56.44 


223.99 








4,861.65 










4,861.65 




156.22 


226.03 








14,813.65 






1,000.00 




15,813.65 




413.17 


719.72 




950.00 


Schol arsh i ps 


4,834.39 










4,834.39 




122.74 


224.76 




325.00 


Scholarships 


2,890.62 










2,890.62 




87.02 


134.39 




23.55 


Scholarsh i ps 


197 86 


2,357.35 






657.50 




3,014.85 






121.35 








121.35 
106 55 








2,500.00 




2,500.00 






1 06 . 55 














75,534.58 




75,534.58 






2,926.50 








2 926.50 








2,078.73 




2,078.73 






36.42 








36 42 




121,476 
20,914 


.78 
.34 








203,610.56 
20,914.34 


-511.04 


1,050.66 




980.00 


Annu i ty 






20,914.34 


-440.38 


16.799.42 










16,799.42 






781.05 


781.05 


2,530.77 


Books 




64,421.29 






325.53 




64,746.82 






2,995.10 




138.80 
325.63 


Speaker's Expenses 
Capital ized 




4,817.71 










4,817.71 




161.15 


223.99 




74.40 


Books 


310.74 


19,566.40 










19,566.40 




1,962.53 


909.69 




303.05 


Books 


2,569.17 


165,460.81 








.50 


165,460.31 






7,716.17 


5,426.55 


2,289.62 


Books 




1,804.25 






.50 




1,804.75 
















612.30 










612.30 




33.61 


28.47 




43.10 


Books 


18.98 


965.80 










965.80 




21.51 


44.90 




54.06 


Books 


12.35 


5,541.02 






100.00 




5,641.02 




321.94 


261.49 








583.43 


1,207.83 


28 1 , 1 96 . 


.83 






1,207.83 


281,622.36 


80.25 


56.16 
1,847.32 


1,847.32 


85.43 


Books 


50.98 


39,733.67 


39,733.67 




35,418.53 










35,418.53 






1,646.70 


1,646.70 








65,630.50 










65,630.50 






3,051.32 


3,051.32 








3,152.93 










3,152.93 






146.59 


146.59 








107.955.98 


251,891, 


.61 






107,955.98 


251,891.61 




5,019.14 


5,019.14 








5,056.68 










5,056.68 




797.30 


235.10 




244.81 


Lectures 


787.59 


1,085.68 










1,085.68 




37.63 


50.48 




24.26 


Books 


63.85 


2,189.40 










2,189.40 




251.26 


101.79 




25.00 




353.05 


8,890.67 










8,896.67 




1 ,096.04 


413.35 




200.00 


Rel igious Ed. Com. 


1,284.39 


2,213.14 










2,213.14 




85.21 


102.89 




95.00 


Prizes 


93.10 


1,680.48 










,1,680.48 




161.06 


78.13 








239.19 


2,454.02 










2,454.02 




174.35 


114.09 




14.36 


Books 


274.08 


4,933.63 










4,933.63 




608.27 


229.38 




3.18 


Campus Club 


829.47 


2,098.39 






97.56 




2,195.95 






97.56 




97.56 


Capital ized 




2,076.43 










2,076.43 




188.62 


96.54 








285.16 


1,346.79 










1,346.79 




37.84 


62.62 




50.00 


Prizes 


50.46 


2,312.51 










2,312.51 






107.51 


107.51 








4,420.49 










4,420.49 




643.95 


205.52 








849.47 


1,927.09 










1,927.09 




151.50 


89.60 




60.00 


Prizes 


181.10 


963.54 










963.64 






44.80 


24.80 


20.00 


Prizes 




3,699.55 










3,699.55 




349.37 


172.00 




163.85 


Equipment, etc. 

See Bucky Fd'n. 

Donations 


357.52 


2,089.23 










2,089.23 






97.13 




97.13 




907.29 


50,345 


.01 


144.31 




1,051.60 


50,586.88 




44.31 




25.00 
19.31 


Pr izes 
Capi tal ized 






$4,339,276, 


.31 


$86,688.42 


$2,216.76 




$4,423,747.97 


$10,917.03 


$204,226.68 


$171,846.27 


$25,540.59 




$17,756.85 



23 



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25 



ROY A. WRIGHT & COMPANY 

CERTIFJED PUBLrC ACCOUNTANTS 



PHILADELPHIA. PA. 



October 9, 1944. 



Board of Managers, 

The Corporation of Haverford College, 

Haverford, Pennsylvania. 

Dear Sirs: 

Pursuant to your request, we have completed an examination of 
the accounts of your Treasurer, J. Henry Scattergood, for the fiscal 
year ended August 31, 1944. 

We verified the cash balances by direct correspondence with 
your depository. The securities in the keeping of the Provident Trust 
Company of Philadelphia were examined by us, while those held by the 
Girard Trust Company and the First National Bank & Trust Company 
of Minneapolis, Minnesota, were certified to us by them, and found to 
be in accordance with th^e Treasurer's report. 

The Treasurer's report for the year was examined and com- 
pared with the books of account and found to agree herewith. 

The Comptroller's Accounts were audited monthly during the 
year. 

In our opinion, the Treasurer's report sets forth the result of 
operation of The Corporation of Haverford College for the fiscal year 
ended August 31, 1944. 

Very truly yours, 




h^^^K 



gjtified Publ(ic/Accountant 



26 



DONATIONS "FOR ADDITIONS TO FUNDS 

JAMES R. MAGEE FUND 

Further distribution of principal 

of Anna J. Magee Trust 449.89 

CENTENARY FUND 

From - George H. Thomas Class of 1902. 50.00 

ELLEN W. LONGSTRETH FUND 

Further realization on legacy 258.00 

J. HENRY SCATTERGOOD FUND 

From - Anonymous 340.00 

ROBERT MARTIN ZUCKERT MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

From - Harry M. Zuckert 1,000.00 

CLASS OF 1917 SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Through - Dr. John W. Spaeth, Jr. 

From William H. Chamberlin 25.00 

Dr. Donald Chandler 20.00 

Jesse G. Forsythe 5.00 

Joseph W, Greene 10.00 

Robert B. Haines 30.00 

H. Lawrence Jones 10.00 

M. Alexander Laverty 10.00 

Edwin F. Lawrence, Jr 200.00 

H. E. McKinstry 20.00 

Edmund T. Price 100.00 

E. Roland Snader 20.00 

John W. Spaeth 15.00 

Arthur E. Spellissy 25.00 

T. Barclay Whitson 25.00 515.00 

(Previous Donations for current scholarships, which have not been used, 
have been added to the Principal of the Fund, in the amount of $142.50) \ 

DANIEL B. SMITH FUND (new) 

From - Anna Wharton Wood (Mrs. Henry A.) 2,500.00 

SARAH TATUM HILLES MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND (new) 

Bequest from Joseph T. Hilles, Class of 1888, 

Wilmington Trust Company, Trustee 75,534.58 

ELIHU GRANT MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND (new) 

From - Mrs. Almy C. Grant 1,200.00 

(Unused balance of Dr. Elihu Grant s donations 
for Beth Shemesh Fund used to start this Fund) 
CLASS OF 1888 LIBRARY FUND 

From Joseph W. Sharp, Jr 100.00 

MATHEMATICS DEPARTMENT PRIZE FUND 

From - Dr. Albert H. Wilson 125.00 $82,072.47 

27 



DONATIONS FOR CURRENT PURPOSES 
FOR SARAH TATUM HILLES MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Income from Trustee 339.99 

FOR PRIZES 

Class of 1902 for Latin Prize from A. C. Wood, Jr 9.00 

FOR LIBRARY 

Matzke Royalties 32.45 

Minor Library Donations 66.60 

Library Associates 

From Mr. & Mrs. C. B. AUendoerfer $ 2.00 

Mr. & Mrs. E. Page AUinson 10.00 

Mrs. Mary R. Antrobus (two years) 4.00 

Dr. & Mrs. Kenneth E. Appel 50.00 

Dr. & Mrs. James A. Babbitt 2.00 

Mr. & Mrs. Wilfred Bancroft 2.00 

Mr. Robert Barrie 2.00 

Mr. & Mrs. William A. Battey 10.00 

Miss Mabel Beard 2.00 

Miss Florence Beddall 2.00 

Dr. & Mrs. C. J. Bergh 2.00 

Miss Margery Ann Bergh 2.00 

Mrs. Robert Montgomery Bird 2.00 

Rev. & Mrs. Russell H. Bishop 2.00 

Mr. & Mrs. Paul Bleyden 2.00 

Mr. & Mrs. Harold W. Brecht 2.00 

Mr. & Mrs. Howard Brinton 2.00 

Lt. Comdr. & Mrs. H. Tatnall Brown, Jr 2.00 

Mr. Thos. K. Brown, Jr. (dec'd) 2.00 

Miss Caroline Burgess 2.00 

Mrs. Helen Cadbury Bush 2.00 

Dr. & Mrs. Florian Cajori 2.00 

Miss Edith Chambers 2.00 

Mrs. George H. Chambers 2.00 

Mr. & Mrs. George K. Chandler 2.00 

Mr. & Mrs. J. Browning Clement, Jr 2.00 

Dr. & Mrs. J. H. Cloud 2.00 

Mrs. William H. Collins 2.00 

Mr. & Mrs. Daniel F. Coogan 2.00 

Dr. Charles W. David 2.00 

Mrs. Charles W, David 2.00 

Mr. & Mrs. Hiram S. Davis 2.00 

Dr. & Mrs. Lovett Dewees 2.00 

Dr. & Mrs. T. McK. Downs 50.00 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas E. Drake 2.00 

Mr, & Mrs. Henry S. Drinker, Jr 10.00 

Mrs. Allan L. Dunning 5.00 

Mr. & Mrs. McClure Fahnestock 2.00 

Dr. & Mrs. Clifford B. Farr 2.00 

Miss Muriel Farr 2.00 

Mr. & Mrs. Earl W. Flosdorf 2.00 

Mr. P. D. Folwell 10.00 

Miss Kathryn V. Forrest 2.00 

Mr. Henry S. Fraser 10.00 



Forward 229.00 99.05 348.99 

28 



Forward 99.05 348.99 

FOR LIBRARY (continued) 

Forward 22'j.?i0 

Major & Mrs. William G. Frey 2.00 

Mrs. Sara K. Fuller 2.00 

Rev. Joseph J. Gildea 2.00 

Mr. Howard Goodhart 10.00 

Mr. & Mrs. Douglas Gould 2.00 

Mr. H. D. Greenwell 2.00 

Miss Gladys H. Griscom 10.00 

Mr. & Mrs. Henry V. Gummere 2.00 

Mr. & Mrs. John F. Gummere 2.00 

Mr. & Mrs. Richard M. Gummere 2.00 

Mr. & Mrs. J. V. Hastings, Jr 2.00 

Mr. & Mrs. Harold Robert Hay 10.00 

Miss Mary E. Heckler 2.00 

Mr. & Mrs. John G. Herndon 5.00 

Mr. Myron F. Hill 10.00 

Miss Margaretta S. Hinchman .- 2.00 

Mr. Si Mrs. David Hinshaw. . .• 10.00 

Pvt. William L. Hires 2.00 

Mr. & Mrs. Clarence G. Hoag 10.00 

Mr. Arthur Hoopes 2.00 

Mr. Allen F, Horton 10.00 

Mr. & Mrs. Wayne B. Hughes 2.00 

Mr. Arthur K. Hulme 2.00 

Mrs. Elizabeth Pinney Hunt 2.00 

Mrs. Ralph D. Jackson 2.00 

Mr. & Mrs. Walter C. Janney 2.00 

Mr. & Mrs. Charles F. Jenkins 10.00 

Mr. & Mrs. Ames Johnston 2.00 

Mr. J. Dean Joly 2.00 

Mr. & Mrs. J. Barclay Jones 2.00 

Mr. Thomas O. Jones 2.00 

Mr. John A. Kelly 10.00 

Mrs. Rayner W. Kelsey 2.00 

Mr. W. M. C. Kimber 2.00 

Mrs. Isaac La Boiteaux 10.00 

Mr. Nathaniel H. Litchfield 2.00 

Mr. & Mrs. John C. Leber 2.00 

Mr. & Mrs. D. P. Lockwood 2.00 

Pfc. Robert M. Lockwood 2.00 

Lt. Benjamin H. Lowry 5.00 

Mr. & Mrs. Benjamin Ludlow 10.00 

Miss Virginia Armitage McCall 2.00 

Mr. & Mrs. Archibald Macintosh 2.00 

Mr. James P. Magill 10.00 

Mr. & Mrs. William D. Marshall 2.00 

Miss Belle Matheson 2.00 

Mr. J. Wesley Matthews 2.00 

Mr. & Mrs. William B. Meldrum 2.00 

Mr. Wolfgang F. Michael 2.00 

Mr. S. G. Morton Montgomery 2.00 

Mr. Charles Henry Moon 2.00 

Mr. & Mrs. Christopher Morley 10.00 

Pres. & Mrs. Felix Morley 10.00 

Mr. C. Christopher Morris 10.00 

Dr. Harold H. Morris 2.00 

Mr. Elliott Morse 2.00 



Forward 467.00 99,05 348.99 

29 



Forward 99.05 348.99 

FOR LIBRARY (continued) 

Forward 467.00 

Dr. & Mrs. Stuart Mudd 2.00 

Rev. & Mrs. Andrew Mutch 2.00 

Mr. Arthur HoWell Napier 2.00 

Mr. Rudolf Neuburger 10.00 

Mr. Philip G. Nordell 2.00 

Miss Violet Oakley 2.00 

Mr. & Mrs. Raymond T. Ohl 2.00 

Mr. Nicholas Orehoff 2.00 

Miss Jessie Allen Page 2.00 

Mr. Frederic Palmer, Jr 2,00 

Mrs. Frederic Palmer, Jr 2.00 

Mr. Oliver W. Paxson 2.00 

Miss Amy L. Post 2.00 

Mr. & Mrs. L. Arnold Post 2.00 

Mr. & Mrs. George P. Rea 2.00 

Mrs. G. R. Rebmann 2.00 

Mr. Layton Register 2.00 

Mrs. Layton Register 2.00 

Mr. & Mrs. Legh W. Reid 10.00 

Mrs. William A. Reitzel 2.00 

Mr. & Mrs. Charles J. Rhoads 10.00 

Mr. & Mrs. Owen B. Rhoads 10.00 

Dr. & Mrs. A. Newton Richards 2.00 

Mr. Benjamin F. Ricker 2.00 

Mr. Charles S. Ristine 2.00 

Mr. & Mrs. Frederick P. Ristine 2.00 

Mr. & Mrs. Leon H. Rittenhouse 2.00 

Mr. & Mrs. George Rosengarten 10.00 

Mr. & Mrs. Ralph M. Sargent 10.00 

Mr. & Mrs. Samuel Scoville; Jr 2.00 

Mr. William E. Scull 10.00 

Mr. Barton Sensenig 2.00 

Mr. & Mrs. Lucius Shero 2.00 

Miss Mary C. Smith 2.00 

Dr. E. Roland Snader, Jr 2.00 

Mr. & Mrs. Edward D. Snyder 2.00 

Mr. & Mrs. Freas B. Snyder 10.00 

Dr. & Mrs. William C. Stadie 2.00 

Mr. & Mrs. I. Thomas Steere 2.00 

Mr. & Mrs. Jonathan M. Steere 10.00 

Mr. & Mrs. Edward Lowber Stokes 2.00 

Mr. & Mrs. J. Tyson Stokes 50.00 

Mrs. Kenneth E. Stuart 2.00 

Dr. & Mrs. Samuel B. Sturgis 2.00 

Dr. Herbert W. Taylor 10.00 

Mrs. Arthur H. Thomas 2.00 

Mrs. George Vaux^ Jr 5.00 

Mr. & Mrs. George C. Vedova 2.00 

Mr. & Mrs. W. Nelson L. West 2.00 

Mr. & Mrs. William T. West 2.00 

Mr. H. Justice Williams 2.00 

Mr. & Mrs. William M. Wills 2.00 

Mr. Albert H. Wilson 2.00 

Mrs. Albert H. Wilson 2.00 

Mr. & Mrs. D. Wright Wilson 2.00 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas Wistar 10.00 



Forward 718.00 99.05 348.99 

30 



Forward 99.05 348.99 

FOR LffiRARY (continued) 

Forward 718.00 

Mr. & Mrs. Alexander C. Wood, Jr 2.00 

Mr. & Mrs. L. Hollingsworth Wood 2.00 

Mr. & Mrs. Richard R. Wood 2.00 

Mr. & Mrs. Edward Woolman 10.00 

Mr. Julius Zieget 10.00 

Dr. L. Wilbur Zimmerman 10.00 

Anonymous 250.00 1,004.00 

FOR LONDON TIMES 



From Christopher Morley 25.00 1,128.05 

CARNEGIE GIFT FOR MUSIC 

Miscellaneous Collections 50.50 

FOR ITALIAN UNDERSTANDING 

From Mr. Aldo Caselli 100.00 

FOR CAMPUS CLUB 

From Mr. &. Mrs. C. B. Allendoerfer 2.00 

Mr. Wm. K. Alsop, Jr 2.00 

Mr. Howard A. Andrews 1.00 

Mrs. H. L. Balderston 2.00 

Mrs. Charles G. Berwind 10.00 

Mr. Daniel B. Boyer 2.00 

Mr. Samuel T. Brinton 1.00 

Mr. & Mrs. Aldo Caselli 2.00 

Mrs. Julia Cope Collins 2.50 

Mr. Aubrey C. Dickson, Jr 2.00 

Mrs. Sydney B. Dunn 20.00 

Mr. Charles Evans 5.00 

Mr. Francis C. Evans 3.00 

Mr. William T. Ferris 5.00 

Mr. & Mrs. Louis C. Green 2.00 

Mr. John A. Kelly 5.00 

Mrs. Rayner W. Kelsey 2.00 

Mr. Morris E. Leeds 25.00 

Mr. M. A. Linton 5,00 

Mr. M. A. Linton, Jr 2.00 

Mr. George B. Mathues 1.00 

Mr. & Mrs. W. B. Meldrum 2.00 

Mr. Walter L. Moore 1.00 

Mr. C. C. Morris 15.00 

Mr. Marriott C. Morris 5.00 

Mr. Charles S. Ristine 5.00 

Mr. J. Henry Scattergood 5.00 

Mr. A. K. Smiley 5.00 

Mrs. A. K. Smiley 5.00 

Mr. Jonathan M. Steere 10.00 

Mr. Abram G. Tatnall 2.00 

Mrs. E. O. Warner 1.00 

Mrs. Henry S. Williams 2.00 

Mr. & Mrs. W. M. Wills 2.00 

Mr. & Mrs. A. H. Wilson 5,00 

Mr. Thomas Wistar 2.00 

168.50 

Pennsylvania Railroad Freight Claim 30.55 199,05 

Forward 1,826.59 

31 



Forward 1,826.59 

FOR CARE OF COPE FIELD 

From Alfred G. Scattergood, Trustee 50.00 

FOR RADIO CLUB 

Interest added 59.84 

FOR ELECTRONICS EQUIPMENT 

From William P. Phillips, Class of 1902 2,500.00 

FOR ENGINEERING EQUIPMENT 

Anonymous 150.00 

FOR CHEMICAL LABORATORY EQUIPMENT 

From J. W. Settle 25.00 

FOR GENERAL PURPOSES 

From T/Sgt. Stephen T. Gulbrandson, Class of 1933 10.00 

FOR EMERGENCY AID TO PROFESSORS 

From Henry S. Drinker, Class of 1900 20.00 

FOR FIELD HOUSE FUND 

(Temporarily invested in U. S. Bonds) 

Lt. Richard S. Bowman 5.00 

Norman S. Braus 15.00 

Lt. C. R. Ebersol 5.00 

J. P. Feil 5.00 

Henry S. Fraser 50.00 

Through A. W. Haddleton 14.75 

Henry W, Johnstone, Jr 2.10 

John W. Pierson, Jr 10.00 

1942 Record Fund 2.90 

Lt. S. R. Stuart 10.00 

John C. Whitehead 25.00 

Anonymous 50.00 

Class of 1904, 40th Anniversary Gift 

Fred V. Andrew 74.00 

Wm. S. Bradley 25.00 

Jos. W. Clark 74.00 

A. Crowell 74.00 

Col. C. R. Haig 74.00 

G. F. Helbert 74.00 

W. T. Hilles 74.00 

Wm. C. Kimber 50.00 

C. C. Morris 400.00 

Dr. H. H. 'lurris 74.00 

H. M. Schabaker 30.00 

Edgar T. Snipes 100.00 

J. M. Stokes, Jr 74.00 1,197.00 1,391.75 

Forward 6,033.18 

32 



Forward 6,033.18 

FOR UNDESIGNATED PURPOSE 

From Class of 1928 37.50 

FOR FACULTY SALARIES 

From Alumni Association 450.00 

FOR ADMINISTRATIVE SALARIES 

From Alumni Association 770.00 

FOR RECONSTRUCTION AND RELIEF 

From Wyomissing Foundation 150.00 

Alvord Foundation 300.00 

M. A. Linton 100.00 

S. Emlen Stokes 250.00 800.00 

FOR SCHOLARSHIPS 

Anonymous 40.00 

Anonymous 200.00 

Anonymous 600.00 

Anonymous 1,000.00 1,840.00 

E. M. Cook - return of Corporation Scholarship 150.00 

Wyomissing Foundation 600.00 

Jansen Foundation 300.00 

Board of Methodist Church 100.00 

Simon Guggenheim Foundation 200.00 

Mrs. W. H. Collins 296.00 3,486.00 

TRIANGLE SOCIETY GIFT 

From Hon. Emory H. Niles 100.00 

Balance of National Foundation for Education 
(for furnishing Government House) trans- 
ferred from 'Donations' a/c 22.96 122.96 

TRIANGLE SOCIETY GIFT (2) » 

Dividends on Sun Oil Company stock donated 75.00 197.96 

LIBRARY ADDITION FOR NEW STACKS 



Class of 1927 - through John C. Lober 

From Franklin Sanders 10.00 

Arthur Silver 5.00 15.00 

11,789.64 



The above is a dividend of $75,00 on 150 shares of Sun Oil Stock, valued at 57 1/8 
making $8 568.75 donated by Joseph N. Pew, Jr. for social, economic and historical 
research. 



33 



REPORT OF 

HAVERFORD COLLEGE LOAN FUND 

Established 1926 

Report No. 18 August 31, 1944 

Current Year 1943-44 

Cash Balance on hand, August 31, 1943 $ 3,283.10 

19 Loans repaid during year 3,946.60 

37 part payments on loans during year 1^968.68 

Interest received during year 772.16 

Adjustment on Cash Balance previously reported 2.82 

$ 9,973.36 

4 Loans made during year 600.00 

Cash Balance on hand August 31, 1944 $ 9,373.36 

Loans outstanding August 31, 1944 17,441.90 

Interest outstanding August 31, 1944 733.42 

Balance in Merion Title & Trust Company 630.88 

Total resources, August 31, 1944 $28,179.56 

Total to August 31, 1944 

Appropriations from Jacob P. Jones Endowment Fund 20,179.04 

1st Donation from Class of 1911 641.30 

2nd Donation from Class of 1911 137.90 

3rd Donation from Class of 1911 28.85 

Donation from Class of 1929 350.27 

Donation from A. R. Katz 500.00 

Donation from Class of 1927 900.00 

Donation from Class of 1908 1,507.96 

Gift from C. C. Morris 50.00 

Gift from John Charles 300. OC 

Gift Anonymous 500.00 

Gift, Anonymous 2,000.00 

Gift, Haverford Society of Maryland 100.00 

Gift, Dr. H. S. Arthur 300.00 

290 I'.ans repaid 41,838.43 

388 payments on loans 15,298.95 

Interest paid up 12,156.18 

Payments from Merion Title & Trust Co. 2/28/33 $42.06 

1/4/38 84.12 

12/31/40 42.06 

7/22/43 42.06 210.30 

Adjustment of previous reports 2.82 

Total Receipts 97,635.00 

Repayments to Corporation $11,000.00 

Repayments of Donations 1,708.05 

Original Funds in Merion Title & Trust Co 841.18 

Check Tax 1.36 

Loans Made 74,710.75 88,261.64 

Cash Balance August 31, 1944 9,373.36 

Oalstandiug interest to August 31, 1944 733.42 

Qjtstandins; loans to August ?1. 1944 17,441.90 

Balance of Merio i Title & Trust Co. ;i/c 630.83 

Total resources August 31, 1944 $28,179.58 



i 



ENDOWMENT FUNDS 



FUNDS FOR GENERAL PURPOSES 



GENERAL ENDOWMENT FUND 

Founded in 1847 with subscriptions of $50,000 by a number of Friends. Addi- 
tions were made as follows: 1868, from an anonymous source, $5,000; 1869, 
bequest of Ann Haines to increase the compensation of professors, $2,670; 1870, 
bequest of Richard D. Wood, $18,682.96; 1872. from William Evans, $1,000; 
1874, from executors of Jesse George, deceased, $5,000; 1880, bequest of Dr. 
Jo.seph W. Taylor. $5,000; 1901. le^'ary of Ann Williams. $2,425.50; I'Ml. 
from children of .Auhrey C. Dickson in lii.s nieniorx . !?.^!)(l. IVesnit hook value, 
$93,753.86. The income is used for salaries and scholarships. 

JOHN FARNUM MEMORIAL FUND 

Founded in 1878 by the heirs of John Farnum by gift of $25,000 as a memorial 
to him. Added to in 1899 by legacy of $10,000 from Elizabeth H. Farnum, widow 
of John Farnum. Present book value, $35,410.66. The income only is to be used 
to endow a "professorship of some practical science or literature." The chair of 
chemistry was designated as the "John Farnum Professor of Chemistry." The 
principal is held in the name of three Trustees for the benefit of The Corporation 
of Haverford College. 

JOHN M. WHITALL FUND 

Founded in 1880 by bequest of $10,000 from John M. Whitall, Sr. Present 
book value, $10,252.18. The bequest is upon the condition that the art of drawing, 
especially mechanical drawing, shall be taught, and the income only is to be used, 
and for this purpose. 

DAVID SCULL FUND 

Founded in 1885 by bequest of $40,000 from David Scull, Sr. Present book 
value, $43, 173. 04. The income only is to be used to endow a professorship. The 
chair of biology was designated as the "David Scull Professor of Biology." 

EDWARD L. SCULL FUND 

Founded in 1865 by net bequest of $9,500 from Edward L. Scull, '64. The legacy 
was added to the General Endowment Fund, but in 1888 it was set apart as a 
separate fund. Present book value, $10,950.03. The income only is to be used. 
The bequest is free from any legally binding conditions, but it was the testator's 
desire "that some judicious means shall be employed by the Managers to further 
advise students on the subjects of diet and reading." 

WISTAR MORRIS MEMOIUAL FUND 

Founded in 1892 by gift of $5,000 in bonds by Mary Morris, widow of Wistar 
Morris, as a memorial to him. Present book value, $4,956.69. There are no 
restrictions. The income is used for general college purposes. 

ISRAEL FRANKLIN WHITALL FUND 

Founded in 1896 by net legacy of $9,667.83 from Israel Franklin Whitall. Pres- 
ent book value, $10,388.86. The income only is to be used for the payment of 
professors or teachers. 



35 



JACOB P. JONES ENDOWMENT FUND 

Founded in 1897 by residuary legacy of Jacob P. Jones. This amounted when 
received to par value of $279,021.60; book value, $332,301.60, and sundry real 
estate. The real estate has all been sold, netting $847,709.92. Present book 
value, $1 ,253/>30.25. The income only is to be used for general college purposes, 
and out of said income there shall be admitted a portion at least of the students 
either free of charge or at reduced rates. In accordance with this provision, about 
$7,500 per annum is used for scholarships, and the balance of income for general 
college purposes. Jacob P. Jones' will contains the following: "My hope is that 
under the blessing and favor of God there will come from this source a revenue 
which shall be productive of growth and vigor in the institution as well as help 
at this critical period of their lives to many deserving young men of slender 
patrimony." 

JOHN FARNUM BROWN FUND FOR THE STUDY OF THE 

BIBLE, BIBLICAL HISTORY AND LITERATURE, 

PHILOSOPHY, AND KINDRED SUBJECTS 

Founded in 1900 by the late T. Wistar Brown as a memorial to his son, John 
Farnum Brown, '93. The original gift was in cash and securities of a par value of 
$43,000, shortly afterwards increased by further gifts of $15,000. The founder 
made further gifts of cash and securities until 1915, the total being $19,381 cash 
and $48,500 par of securities with book value of $41,490. His total gifts therefore 
had a book value of $234,970.81. Of this, $5,000 donated in 1910 is for endowment 
of prizes in Biblical History and in Philosophy. A portion of the income was 
capitalized each year to keep intact the full value of the fund until 1940 when 
this fund was included in the Consolidation of funds. Present book value, 
$265,841.10. The income only is to be used for the purpose of making provision 
for the regular study of the Bible and Biblical History and Literature, and as 
way opens for religious teaching. In 1910, the scope and title of the Fund were 
enlarged to include "and Philosophy and Kindred Subjects." Income up to $200 
may be used for prizes in Biblical Literature and Philosophy. 

ELLEN WALN FUND 

Founded in 1900 by legacy of $10,000 from Ellen Wain. Present book value, 
$10,711.80. There are no restrictions. The income is used for general college 
purposes. 

CLEMENTINE COPE ENDOWMENT FUND 

Founded in 1904 by bequest of $25,000 from Clementine Cope. Present book 
value, $20,7 10.06. There are no restrictions. The income is used for general college 
purposes. 

NATHAN BRANSON HILL TRUST 

Founded in 1904 by deposit with First National Bank and Trust Co., Min- 
neapolis, Minn., trustee, of a paid-up life insurance policy for $5,000 by Samuel 
Hill, '78, being in memory of his father, Nathan Branson Hill. The income is to 
be used to aid the maintenance of Haverford College so long as it shall remain 
under the auspices of the Society of Friends. In 1931, Samuel Hill died and the 
policy realized $5,039. Present book value, $5,097.41. 

JOSEPH E. GILLINGHAM FUND 

Founded in 1907 by bequest of $50,000 from Joseph E. Gillingham. Present 
book value, $40,849.10. The testator said, "I request, but I do not direct, that 
part of the income of this legacy may be used for free scholarships for meritorious 
students." In accordance with this request, $800 is appropriated annually from 
the income for scholarships, the balance being used for general college purposes. 



36 



HENRY NORRIS FUND 

Founded in 1907 by bequest of $5,000 from Henry Norris. Present book value, 
$5,671.42. There are no restrictions. The income is used for general college 
purposes. 

ELIZABETH H. FARNUM FUND 

Founded in 1891. The original principal of this fund, amounting to $10,000, 
is held by the Provident Trust Co. of Philadelphia under a deed of trust created 
by Elizabeth H. Farnum. The first income accrued to the College in 1914. Present 
book value, $9,624.66. There are no restrictions to the use of the income, and same 
is applied to general college purposes. Application to Court for the transfer of this 
fund to the Corporation of Haverford College has been approved and will be 
carried out in coming fiscal year. 

JAMES R. MAGEE FUND 

Founded in 1915 by bequest of $10,000 from James R. Magee, '59, and added 
to in 1925. 1926, 1928, 1929, 1930, 1931, 1932, 1936, 1937, 1940, and 1944 by addi- 
tional payments of $29,182.84, $1,694.84, $499.31, $499.68, $488.85, s207.33, $400, 
$250, $100, and $449.89 under his legacy. Present book value, $43,009.70. There 
are no restrictions except that the income only is to be used. This is applied to 
general college purposes. 

ALBERT K. SMILEY FUND 

Founded in 1915 by gift of $1,000 from Daniel Smiley, '78, as a memorial to 
his brother, Albert K. Smiley, '49, and added to in 1924 and 1926. Present book 
value, $1,445.31. There are no restrictions except that preference was expressed 
that the income only should be used. This is applied to general college purposes. 

THE HINCHMAN ASTRONOMICAL FUND 

Founded in 1917 by bequest of $10,000 par value securities from Charles S. 
Hinchman. Increased in 1928, 1929, 1930, 1931, 1932, 1933, 1934, 1935, and 1936 
by donations of $28,926.95 from a friend of the College. Present book value, 
$38,074.84. The income only to be used "to increase the salary of the astronomical 
professorship so as to provide a suitable instructor in the ennobling study of the 
heavens." 

WALTER D. AND EDITH M. L. SCULL FUND 

Founded in 1918 by bequest of Walter D. Scull, whose death followed shortly 
after the death of his sister, Edith M. L. Scull. Each left his or her estate to the 
other, unless predeceased; in this latter case both American estates were left to 
Haverford College. Both were children of Gideon D. Scull, '43, and resided in 
England. Income accumulated before the receipt of the fund by the College 
amounted to $16,887.66, of which $15,078.51 was added to the principal of the 
fund. Present book value, $168,196.24. The fund was created to establish a pro- 
fessorship of modern English constitutional history, and the chair has been 
designated as the Walter D. and Edith M. L. Scull Professorship of History. 

ALBIN GARRETT MEMORIAL FUND 

Founded in 1919 by legacy of $25,000 from Mary Hickman Garrett, in memory 
of her late husband, Albin Garret, '64. Present book value, $25,795.00. There are 
no restrictions. The income is used for general college purposes. 

ARNOLD CHASE SCATTERGOOD MEMORIAL FUND 

Founded in 1919 by gift of $30,000 in securities from Maria Chase Scattergood 
in memory of her son, Arnold Chase Scattergood, of the Class of 1919, who died 
in his Junior year. Present book value, $23,492.69. The income only is to be used 
toward the payment of professors' salaries. 



37 



FRANCIS B. GUMMERE MEMORIAL FUND 

Founded in 1920. This fund was started by a gift of $25,000 from the late Miss 
Emily H. Bourne, of New York, conditional upon the raising of $100,000 addi- 
tional for an endowment of the Chair of English Literature in memory of her 
friend. Professor Francis Barton Gummere. A committee of alumni, consisting of 
J. Stogdell Stokes, '89, chairman; E. R. Tatnall, '07, treasurer; Hans Froelicher, 
'12, secretary; Charles J. Rhoads, '93; Alfred M. Collins, '97; Winthrop Sargent, 
Jr., '08, and Parker S. Williams, '94, working with President Comfort, organized 
a comprehensive campaign among the alumni and friends of the College to raise 
$375,000 for this purpose and for increase of professors' salaries; the first $100,000 
of unspecified gifts was used to complete the Francis B. Gummere Memorial 
Fund to at least $125,000, and the balance comprised the Isaac Sharpless Memo- 
rial Fund. Total, book value, $120,991.54. 



ISAAC SHARPLESS MEMORIAL FUND 

Founded in 1920. The alumni of the College conducted during 1920 a campaign 
for $375,000 additional endowment for the College to make possible additional 
salaries to the professors. Appeal was made to found two new funds, the Francis B. 
Gummere Memorial Fund and the Isaac Sharpless Memorial Fund. The funds 
received, except where otherwise specified, were first applied to the completion 
of the former up to $125,000 (see above). Specified gifts and donations thereafter 
received were then applied to the Isaac Sharpless Memorial Fund. The income 
only is to be used for salaries of professors. Total book value, $210,754.11. 



GENERAL EDUCATION BOARD FUND 

The General Education Board of New York appropriated $125,000 in 1920 to 
the campaign for increase of endowment when the Francis B. Gummere Memorial 
Fund and the Isaac Sharpless Memorial Fund, totaling $375,000, were raised. In- 
terest at five per cent was paid on the full sum for three years, and the $125,000 
in full payment was completed in 1926-1927. Total book value, $121,480.36. 



HAVERFORD IMPROVEMENT FUND 

Founded in 1922 to hold the Corporation's undivided share in College Lane land 
and eight houses. This property was turned over to the Corporation free of debt 
on Third Month 17, 1922, and with same the then debt of the Corporation amount- 
ing to $155,942.15 was liquidated. The fund started with an undivided interest of 
$19,000. There was added in 1922, $9,000; and in 1925, $2,000. In 1926, $5,000 of 
this fund was sold and the proceeds were appropriated for the alterations to 
Roberts Hall. The oalance of this fund, $25,000, was also used in 1927 for the 
same purpose. The income was used for general college purposes. It is hoped 
that this fund may be refunded from the Centenary Campaign, a part of which 
was planned to cover the Roberts Hall alterations. 

The College Lane land was purchased in 1886 for the benefit of the College by 
David Scull, Justus C. Strawbridge, Richard Wood and Francis Stokes, Managers 
of the College and now all deceased. With contributions raised by them and by 
mortgages on which they went on the bonds, funds were raised to build six dwelling 
houses, and two houses were built by the Corporation itself. From the income of 
the houses the debt against the properties was gradually reduced until it was 
entirely liquidated in 1919. The net income from 1919 until 1922, when the 
property was turned over to the Corporation, was applied toward the reduction 
of the Corporation's debt. 



38 



CENTENARY FUND 

Centenary Fund (1) was founded in 1926 by gifts to the College in anticipation 
of the one hundredth anniversay of its founding in 1833. There were no restric- 
tions and the income was used for general college purposes until 1935, when the 
principal was used in the liquidation of debt. 

In 1935 a further campaign among the Alumni was conducted under the direc- 
tion of William M. Wills, '04, to add to the funds raised in commemoration of the 
Centenary. This was designated as Centenary Fund (2), but in 1935-1936 the 
payment of pledges to (1) were merged with (2) at the request of donors, and the 
two accounts are now considered as one. 

During 1936-1937, $9,000 additional donations were made by members of the 
Strawbridge family, and of these $3,372.63 were transferred for the final cost of 
the William J. Strawbridge '94 Memorial Astronomical Observatory, and $5,627,37 
were set aside to establish the Strawbridge Observatory Maintenance Fund. Other 
additional gifts of $16,017.04 were made in 1936-1937, $7,700 in 1937-1938, $2,150 
in 1938-1939, and $15 in 1939-1940 bringing the totals contributed to both funds 
to date, for the Observatory $47,000, and for other uses $145,947.55. 

From the $16,017.04, together with $1,550 realized from a previous gift of an 
investment, the balance of the debt for pension contributions $12,022.57 was met, 
$5,544.47 was applied to the debt for accrued deficits, $7,700 was applied to the 
npi-ratiiiK year 1937-1*^38. and $_M50 to that of 1938-1939, IflS.OO to that of 
1939-1940, and $11.34 for 1940-1941, and $50 for 1943-1944. 

There .remained one investment in this fund not yet realized upon with a book 
value of $231.06. At end of 1943-44 this was absorbed into Consolidated Investment 
Account, and the debt reduced further by $231.06. 

WILLIAM PENN FOUNDATION 

Started in 1926 toward a fund of $120,000 to establish a chair or lectureship in 
Political Science and International Relations. This fund forms a part of the Cen- 
tenary program to raise $1,000,000. This foundation is to be devoted, at the dis- 
cretion of the Managers, to providing adequate undergraduate instruction in the 
theory and practice of our own and other governments, in the history of past 
attempts to secure international agreements and in the methods by which good 
international understanding may be promoted and maintained. Book value to 
date, $98,346.29. 

WALTER CARROLL BRINTON MEMORIAL FUND 

Founded in 1920 by gift of $5,000 by the family of Walter Carroll Brinton, 
Class of 1915, who died in France Twelfth Month 8, 1918, while engaged in 
Friends' Reconstruction Work. The fund sustained the Walter Carroll Brinton 
Scholarship until 1926-1927. It was then increased $6,000 by further gifts of the 
founders, and at their request the purpose was changed from a scholarship fund 
to form a separately named fund of the William Fenn Foundation, with its income 
to be used for the same objects. Present book value, $13,610.80. 

CORPORATION FUND 

Founded in 1928 by setting aside $70,000 of proceeds from sale of 5.811 acres 
of land on the southern boundary and at the southeastern corner of the College 
farm. In 1937, the fund was increased $8,810, being proceeds of the sale of 1.762 
acreas of land to the Philadelphia Skating Club and Humane Society for their new 
ice skating rink. Present book value, $77,093.02. The fund is invested and the 
income used for general college purposes, until otherwise directed by the Managers. 

ELIZABETH J. SHORTRIDGE FUND 

Founded in 1930 by bequest from Elizabeth J. Shortridge, without restrictions. 
The fund is invested, and until otherwise directed by the Managers, the income 
only is used for general purposes. Present book value, $9,635.43. 



39 



HOWARD COMFORT MEMORIAL FUND 

Founded in 1934 and added to in 1935, 1936, and 1937 by donations totaling 
$5,000 from President William Wistar Comfort in memory of his father, Howard 
Comfort, Class of 1870, who was a Manager from 1880 until his death in 1912, 
and Secretary of the Board of Managers from 1884 until 1908. The income only 
is to be used, and for general purposes. Present book value, $4,844.02. 

EMMA RIDGWAY COMLY FUND 
Founded 1935 by bequest of $50,000 from Emma Ridgway Comly, a Philadel- 
phia Friend. The bequest was unrestricted as to both principal and income. The 
income is used for general purposes. Present book value, $48,165.07. 

ELLEN W. LONGSTRETH FUND 

Founded 1935 by bequest of $20,000 and her residuary estate from Ellen W. 
Longstreth, a Friend belonging to Haverford Meeting, and living in Bryn Mawr. 
The principal and income are both unrestricted. The bequest of $20,000 and resid- 
uary $84,416.28 in 1935-36, together with further realization on residuary assets, 
viz. $3,338.69 in 1936-37, ^73.33 in 1938, $166.80 in 1942-43, and $258.00 in 1943-44. 
rnake a total of $108,253.10. There are some participations in real estate not yet 
liquidated, which will increase or decrease this fund. The income is used for 
general purposes, with a usual allotment of $300 for Quaker books. Present book 
value $105,310.22. 

ALBERT L. BAILY FUND 

Founded in 1936 by an unrestricted bequest of $5,000 from Albert L. Daily, 
'78. The income is used for general purposes. Present book value, $4, 817. 71. 

ELIZABETH B. WISTAR WARNER FUND 

Founded First Month 16, 1937,by unrestrictea Dequest of $4,950 from Elizabeth 
B. Wistar Warner, of Germantown, widow of George M. Warner, '73. The income 
is used for general purposes. Present book value, $4,769.54. 

T. ALLEN HILLES BEQUEST 

Founded First Month 19, 1937, by receipt of the proceeds of a trust fund created 
in 1935 by T. Allen Hilles, class of-1870, formerly of Wilmington, Delaware, re- 
cently of Glen Mills, Pa., who died Uth Month 15, 1935. The amount received 
in stocks and cash was $285,000. Proceeds of mortgages of $7,460.94 in 1938, and 
final cash from executor in 1939 of $1,603.37 brought the gross total to $294,064.31. 
From this was deducted in 1939 the final settlement of taxes and fees totalling 
$13,300, thus making the final net bequest $280,764.31. Accumulated income of 
$12,489.77 was also received on First Month 19, 1937. In the trust created by the 
donor in 1935 he provided: "The gift to Haverford College shall constitute a fund 
to be known as 'The Hilles Bequest,' and the income shall be used for repair, up- 
keep and improvement of the building which I have given to Haverford College 
known as the Hilles Laboratory of Applied Science of Haverford College. My 
purpose in making this gift is primarily to relieve the Corporation of Haverford 
College from any additional expense on account of the erection of the building 
which I have given them, and the accompanying expansion of its educational 
activities, but whenever and if the Board of Managers or other governing body 
of the College shall determine it to be for the best interest of the College to devote 
the whole or any part of the income of the fund to uses other than those above 
specified, such income may be applied to such uses and in such manner as the 
Board of Managers or other governing body may in its absolute discretion deter- 
mine." Present book value, $270,528.30. 

LEONARD L. GREIF, JR., AND ROGER L. GREIF FUND 

Founded Ninth Month 29, 1937, by gift of $1,000 from Leonard L. Gieif, '34, 
and Roger L. Greif, '37, of Baltimore. The gift was unrestricted, but the Managers 
have set aside this fund as endowment for general purposes, the income only to 
be used, until otherwise determined by them. Present book value, $963.54. 

40 



EDWARD M. WISTAR FUND 

Founded First Month 9, 1938, by gift of $2,500 from Edward M. Wistar. 72. 
for endowment, the income only to be used for general purposes. Present book 
value, $2,408.86. 

MORRIS E. LEEDS FUND 

Founded Sixth Month 26. 1941. by gift of 400 Participating Shares of Leeds 
and Northrup Stock Trust. The fund is unrestricted as to principal and 
interest, but was ordered by the Managers, until otherwise directed, to be 
included among the funds for General Purooses. the income only to be used. 
Present book value. $39,428.52. This fund is subject to an annuity of $1600, 
during the life of its donor. 

J. HENRY SCATTERGOOD FUND 

Founded Tenth Month, 1941, by donations totaling $1,660, made by members 
of the Board of Managers in recognition of the services for 25 years of J. Henry 
Scattergood, '96. as Treasurer of the Corporation of Haverford College. A 
further gift of $340 was made in 1943-44. 

The income of this fund is to be used in the field of International Relations 
and to be at the disposal of the President of the College and the William Penn 
Professor holding the Chair in Political Science and International Relations. 
If the income in any year is not used for the special purposes as stated, in the 
discretion of the President, it may be used for general purposes. It is further 
provided that after Tenth Month 1, 1951 the use of the fund for other purposes, 
both as to principal and income, shall be subject to the direction of the Board of 
Managers of Haverford College. Present book value, $1,979.41. 

FUND FOR GRADUATE SCHOOL 

MOSES BROWN FUND 

A trust founded by T. Wistar Brown, in 1906, as a memorial to his father, 
Moses Brown. Transferred to the College in 1916 after his death, having at that 
time a oar value of $372,821.91 and book value of $318,823.56. Presejit book 
value, $342,673.70. The fund was created to establish a graduate course in religious 
study in harmony with and supplementary to the teaching and study provided 
for by the John Farnum Brown Fund. The income only is to be used; at least 
ten per cent of the total income must be capitalized each year. The unused income, 
if any, is likewise capitalized at the close of each fiscal year. The graduate school 
supported by the Moses Brown Fund was designated "The Thomas Wistar Brown 
Graduate School." In 1927 the former separate school was discontinued and eight 
graduate scholarships were created. 

In 1937-1938, arrangements were first made for cooperation in courses with 

Pendel Hill, a school for religious education under the care of Friends, located at 
Wallingford, Pa. 

FUNDS FOR INFIRMARY 

INFIRMARY ENDOWMENT FUND 

Founded in 1911 from subscriptions totaling $9,072.55, raised among alumni 
and friends of the College. Present book value, $9,301.50. The income is used 
toward the expenses of the Morris Infirmary. 

JOHN W. PINKHAM FUND 

Founded in 1911 by legacy of $5,000 from Dr. John W. Pinkham, '60, being 
transmitted by gift from his widow, Cornelia F. Pinkham. Present book value, 
$4,875.05. There are no binding conditions, but as she expressed an interest in the 
Morris Infirmary, then building, the Board of Managers directed that the income 
of this fund should be used in the support and maintenance of the Infirmary. 



41 



FUND FOR HAVEKFORD UNION 

HAVERFORD UNION FUND 

Founded in 1920 by gift of $1,000 par value of bond at book value of $800 and 
$678.59 cash, and all the personal property in the Union from the Haverford 
C(jile^;e Union. The College assumed the responsibility for the care of the building 
First Month 16, 1920. The income is used toward the maintenance of the Union 
building. Present book value, $1, 810. ,1^. 



FUNDS FOR SCHOLARSHIPS 

THOMAS P. COPE FUND 

Founded in 1842 by gift of sixty shares of Lehigh Coal and Navigation Co. 
stock, par value $3,000, from Thomas P. Cope. Present book value, $,S, 066.1.?. 
The income only is to be used "for the education of young men to qualify them 
to become teachers, but who are not of ability to pay their own schooling " This 
fund sustains the 7 homas P. Cope Scholarships. 

EDWARD YARNALL FUND 

Founded in 1860 by bequest of $5,000 from Edward Yarnall. Present book value, 
$5,847.96. The income only is to be usetl for "the support of free scholarships." 
The fund sustains the Edward Yarnall Scholarships. 

ISAIAH V. WILLIAMSON FUND 

Founded in 1876 and increased in 1883 by gifts of sundry ground rents from 
Isaiah V. Williamson. Present book value, $19,094.90. The income >. ly is to be 
used for free scholarships. The fund sustains the Isaiah V. Williamson Scholarships. 

RICHARD T. JONES SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Founded in 1885 by bequest of $5,000 from Jacob P. Jones as a memorial to 
his late son, Richard T. Jones, '63. Present book value, $4,871.92. The income 
only to be used to sustain the "Richard T. Jones Scholarship." 

MARY M. JOHNSON SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Founded in 1897 by bequest of $5,000 from Mary M. Johnson. Accrued interest 
before payment to the College increased the fund by $3,062.95. Present book value, 
$6,757.92. The bequest was to establish a "perpetual scholarship." The fund sus- 
tains the Mary M. Johnson Scholarships. 

SARAH MARSHALL SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Founded in 1897 by bequest of $5,000 from Sarah Marshall. Accrued interest 
before payment to the College increased the fund by $2,589.49. Present book value, 
$7,6.^1.02. The bequest was to establish a "perpetual scholarship." The fund 
sustains the Sarah Marshall Scholarships. 

CLEMENTINE COPE FELLOWSHIP FUND 

Founded in 1899 by gift of $25,000 from Clementine Cope. Present book value 
$22,012.96. The gift was to establish the "Clementine Cope Fellowship Fund to as- 
sist worthy and promising graduates of Haverford College in continuing their course 
of study at Haverford or at some other institution of learning in this country or 
abroad." The selection of the Fellows is made by the Board of Managers upon 
nomination by the Faculty. 

ISAAC THORNE JOHNSON SCHOLARSHIP FUND 
Founded in 1916 by gift of $5,000 from Isaac Thorne Johnson, '81. Present 

42 



bfjok value, $8,170.08. The gift was to establish "The Isaac Thome Johnson 
Scholarshi]) to aid aiif! assist worthy young men of Wilmington Yearly Meeting 
or of the Central West to enjoy the privileges of Haverford College." Unused 
income is added to the princijial of the fund. 

CASPAR WISTAR MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Founded in 1920 by gift of Edward M. and Margaret C. Wistar of $5,000 par 
value in bonds in memory of their son, Caspar Wistar, of the Class of 1902, who 
died in Guatemala in 1917 while engaged in mission service in that country. The in- 
come only is to be used for scholarships, primarily for sons of parents engaged in 
Christian service, including secretaries of Young Men's Christian Associations, or 
students desiring preparation for similar service in America or other countries. 
Present book value, $2,84.^.61. 

J. KENNEDY MOORHOUSE SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Founded in 1926 by gifts totaling $3,000, with $1,000 added in 1926, and $1,000 
in 1928 and $1,000 in 1929 from the Class of 1900 in memory of their classmate, 
J. Kennedy Moorhouse. The scholarship provided by this fund is "to be awarded, 
whenever a vacancy shall occur, to the boy ready to enter the Freshman class, 
who in the judgment of the President of the College appears best fitted to uphold 
at Haverford the standard of character and conduct typified by J. Kennedy Moor- 
house, 1900, as known to his classmates: A man, modest, loyal, courageous, rever- 
ent without sanctimony; a lover of hard play and honest work; a leader in clean 
and joyous living." Present book value, $4,967.88. 

LOUIS JAQUETTE PALMER SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Founded in 1928 by gift of $5,000 from Triangle Society, as follows: 

"The Triangle Society of Haverford College herewith presents to the Corpora- 
tion of Haverford College, a fund of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000) to be here- 
after known and designated as the 'Louis Jaquette Palmer Scholarship Fund'; 

"This fund represents contributions from the members of the Triangle Society 
of Haverford College who have been thus inspired to perpetuate the memory of 
their fellow member, Louis Jaquette Palmer, of the Class of 1894, one of the found- 
ers of the Triangle Society, whom they admired for his cooperative spirit and 
constructive interest in student and community welfare. The fund is placed with 
the Corf>oration of Haverford College with the understanding: 

"That such student shall be selected from a list of those eligible for entrance to 
Haverford College, who shall have combined in his qualifications the fulfillment 
of such conditions as apply to applicants for the Rhodes Scholarships under the 
terms of its creation, and furthermore that the student so selected and entered in 
Haverford College may continue to receive said scholarship fund throughout his 
course at College, subject to the approval of the Committee, otherwise preference 
shall be given to applications for the Freshman Class; 

"That the selection of said student and the determination of the qualities and 
conditions hereinbefore mentioned shall be subject to the decision and control of 
a committee of three (3), which committee shall be composed of two (2) members 
of the Triangle Society and the President of Haverford College, the said members 
of the Triangle Society to select and recommend the applicants and the committee 
as a whole to determine their qualifications and eligibility. 

"Finally, in the event that no student is selected by the Triangle Society or 
that a vacancy occurs, the income from said funds and any additions shall accumu- 
late as provided under the customary rules and regulations of the Corf>oration of 
Haverford College." 

Present book value, $4,817.71. 

PAUL W. NEWHALL MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Established in 1931 by bequest of $5,045.60 from Mary Newhall in memory 
of her father, Paul W. Newhall, a Manager, 1844-48, for the establishment of a 
scholarship fund. The income only to be used for free scholarship purposes. 
Present book value, S4,X61.6.S. 

43 



ROBERT MARTIN ZUCKERT MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Founded in 1935 by gift of $750, $2,000 each vear 1936 to 1940, and in 1942; 
$2,500 in 1941 : and $1,000 in 1943: by Harry M. Zuckert. New York, in memory 
of his son, Robert Martin Zuckert, of the Class of 1936, who was killed in an 
accident in June, 1935. The income is to be used for scholarships and the donor 
said, "I should prefer a boy who is a native of New York or Connecticut and 
who now resides in one of those States." Present book value, $15,813.65. 

SAMUEL E. HILLES ENDOWMENT 

CREATED BY MINA COLBURN HILLES 

Founded in 1935 by gift of $5,000 from Mrs. Mina Colburn Hiiies, of Orlando, 
Fla., in memory of her husband, Samuel E. Hilles, Class of 1874, formerly of 
Cincinnati, who died in 1931. This fund was created under a trust deed with Cen- 
tral Title and Trust Co., Orlando, Fla., to whom annual reports are to be made. 
The income only is to be used for scholarships for worthy students who are un- 
able to finance their expenses at Haverford College. Present book value, $4,834.39. 

CLASS OF 1913 SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Founded Fourth Month 15, 1937, by gift of $3,000 from Class of 1913 for the 
endowment of scholarship aid. The income only is to be used for scholarship aid, 
to be awarded annually to a worthy student of any undergraduate class. Prefer- 
ence is to be given to sons of members of the Class of 1913 who mav apply and 
who meet the usual requirements of the College. Present book value $2,890.62. 

THE AUGUSTUS TABER MURRAY RESEARCH SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Founded Fifth Month 31, 1939 by gift from two anonymous friends of Dr. 
Augustus Taber Murray, '85, by gifts of $20,000 par value of securities subject 
to annuity during their lives, and with permission to use principal for the annuity 
payments, if necessary. 

Upon the deaths of the two annuitants, the remaining principal shall be held 
in a fund, the "Income to be used for scholarships in recognition of the scholarly 
attainments of Augustus Taber Murray, a distinguished Alumnus of Haverford 
College, of the Class of 1885, and for many years a professor of Leland Stanford 
University, the fund to be known as 'The Augustus Taber Murray Research 
Scholarship.' Then scholarships in English literature or philology, the classics, 
German literature or philology (in order of preference) shall be awarded upon such 
terms and conditions as the College may from time to time establish to students 
who have received the bachelor's degree at Haverford College, and shall be 
awarded for the purpose of study in other institutions toward the degree of Doctor 
of Philosophy or such degree as may in the future correspond to that degree." 

The amount of the Scholarship is to be $900 a year whenever awarded, and only 
unmarried students are eligible to hold it. Present book value $20,914.34. 

THE CLASS OF 1917 SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Founded Seventh Month 13, 1942 by initial gift of $2,000.00 from the Class 
of 1917, John W. Spaeth, Jr., Treasurer, as a Twenty-fifth Anniversary Gift. 
A further gift of $250.00 was made at the same time to cover the first two years 
of a scholarship of $125.00 per year. Preference is to be given to a son of a member 
of the Class of 1917. The income only is to be used for a scholarship to the extent 
of $150.00 per annum. Further contributions from the members of the Class of 
1917 are to be applied in the following order: 

(1) — To supplement the annual income from the principal sum of $2,000.00, 
so that the annual scholarship stipend shall be $150.00, or as near that sum 
as may be; 

(2) — To add to the principal sum any surplus of these annual contributions 
not needed to serve the purpose of (1). Since the scholarship stipend for the years 
1942-1943 and 1943-1944 is already provided for bv the additional $250.00 
already contrii)uted by the Class of 1917, the annual contributions from the Class 
in these two years may be added at once to the principal sum of $2,000.00, thus 
serving the purpose of (2) above. Present book value, $3,014.85. 

44 



DANIEL B. SMITH FUND 
(This fund is new this year) 

Founded Tenth Month 6. 1943 by gift of $2,500 from Anna Wharton Wood, of 
Waltham. Mass. This will be increased by a bequest of S2.500 made by Miss Esther 
Morton Smi»h. of Germantown. Philadelnhia. who died Third Month 18. 1942. 

This funo is established by the granddaughters of Daniel B. Smith "in loving 
memory of their grandfather and his intimate association with the early years of 
the College." 

The income is to be used, in the discretion of the Faculty, as an annual scholar- 
ship for some young man needing financial aid in his College course. Preference 
is to be given to a descendant of their father. Benjamin R. Smith, if any such 
should apply. Present book value, $2,500. 



SARAH TATUM HILLES MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

(This fund is new this year) 

Founded Eleventh Month 1, 1943 by bequest of $75,534.58 from Joseph T. Hilles 
1888, in memory of his mother "Sarah Tatum Hilles." 

The will directs that the income be used "to provide for such number of annual 
scholarships of $250 each as such income shall be sufficient to create" ; they are 
to be awarded by the Managers upon "needy and deserving students," and to be 
known as "Sarah Tatum Hilles Memorial Scholarships." 

It is estimated that twelve scholars can be thus provided for at present. Present 
book value $75,534.58. 



ELIHU GRANT MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND 
(This fund is new this year) 

Established Second Month 2, 1944 by gift of $200 from Mrs. Elihu Grant to 
supplement the simultaneous transfer of $803.73 to this new fund from Donations 
Account, being the balance of Donations made by Dr. Grant during his lifetime 
to the Beth Shemesh account, and $75.00 realized from the sale of some of his books. 
Mrs. Grant has made a further gift of $1,000 under date of June 30, 1944. 

With the donor's approval, the terms of the fund are as follows : 

"Founded in 1944 to commemorate the service to Haverford College of Dr. 
Elihu Grant, from 1917 to 1938. a member of the College faculty. The income from 
this fund is applied to scholarship assistance to students in the Humanities, pri- 
marily these specializing in the study of Biblical Literature and Oriental subjects, 
and is limited to those whose major subject has been approved by the College 
faculty. In special circumstances the income may be utilized to assist those working 
for a post-graduate degree at Haverford College." 

If conditions change, the Managers are given power to change the use of the fund. 
The present income will provide a scholarship of $80. Present book value $2,078.73. 



45 



FUNDS FOR THE LIBRARY 
ALUMNI LIBRARY FUND 

Founded in 1863 by contributions from the alumni and other friends of the 
College. In 1909 the unexpended balance (about $5,000) of a fund of $10,000 
raised in 1892, and known as the "New Library Fund," was merged into the 
Alumni Library Fund. Present book value, $16,799.42. The income is used for 
binding and miscellaneous expenses of the Library. 

MARY FARNUM BROWN LIBRARY FUND 

Founded in 1892 by gift of $20,000 from T. Wistar Brown, executor of the 
Estate of Mary Farnum Brown. Additions were made by T. Wistar Brown in 
1894, $10,000 for a lecture fund, and in 1913, $20,000. In 1916, after T. Wistar 
Brown's death, there was added to this fund $34,499.78 par value of securities, 
book value, $30,149.78. being a trust which he had created for this purpose Jn 
1908 and to which he had made additions in subsequent years. Present book value, 
$67,746.82. The purpose of this fund (except $10,000) is for the increase and 
extension of the Library. The income only is to be used for the purchase of books, 
and one-ntth ol same is to be spent tor books promoting the increase of Christian 
knowledge. The books purchased with the income of this fund are marked by a 
special book-plate. The income of $10,000 of the fund is to provide for an annual 
course of lectures upon Biblical subjects designated "The Haverford Library Lec- 
tures." Unused income from the fund, if any, must be capitalized at the end of 
each fiscal year. 

WILLIAM H. JENKS LIBRARY FUND 

Founded in 1910 by gift of $5,000 from Hannah M. Jenks, widow of William 
H. Jenks. The fund was first known as "Special Library Fund," but after the death 
of Hannah M. Jenks was changed, in 1916, to "William H. Jenks Library Fund." 
Present book value, $4,817.71. The purpose of this fund is that the income shall 
be used for the care of the collection of Friends' books made by William H. Jenks 
and given by his widow to Haverford College, and to make appropriated additions 
thereto. Any income not used for these purposes may be used toward the general 
needs of the Library. 



MARY WISTAR BROWN WILLIAMS LIBRARY FUND 

Founded in 1914 by gift of $20,000 from Parker S. Williams, '94, as a memorial 
to his late wife, Mary Wistar Bro-vn Williams. Present book value, $19,566.40. 
The income only is to be used for the purchase of books for the Library, preferably 
books coming within the classes of history, poetry, art, and English and French 
literature. The books purchased with the income of this fund are marked by a 
special book-plate. 



ANNA YARNALL FUND 

Founded in 1916 by residuary bequest of $13,000 par value of securities with 
book value of $7,110, and one-half interest in suburban real estate from Anna 
Yarnall. Additional amount under bequest was received in 1918. Present book 
value, $167,265.06. The real estate was sold in 1923 and netted the College 
$164,820.50. The bequest was made for the general use of the Library. The 
Testatrix says, "I do not wish to restrict the managers as to the particular applica- 
tion of this fund, but desire them to use the income arising f^rom it as in their 
best judgment and discretion shall seem best, for the purchase of books and manu- 
scripts, book cases, rebinding of books, and, if need be, the principal or portions 
thereof, or the income or portions thereof, for additions to the present Library 
building, or the erection of new Library buildings. I direct that all books purchased 
with this fund shall be plainly marked 'Charles Yarnall Memorial' in memory of 
my father, Charles Yarnall." 

46 



J 



F. B. GUMMERE LIBRARY FUND 

Founded in 1920 by gift of $635.47, raised among the students by the Students, 
Association of the College as a memorial to Professor Francis Barton Gummere. 
The income only is to be used to buy for the Haverford College Library books on 
the subjects that he taught or was interested in. 

The student's Association voted also to raise twenty-five dollars for a special 
shelf in the Library to be known as the "F. B. Gummere Memorial Shelf." This 
shelf, with its proper inscription, holds the books purchased by this fund. Present 
book value, $612.30. 



EDMUND MORRIS FERGUSSON, JR., CLASS OF 1920 MEMORL/a FUND 

Founded in 1920 by memorial gift of $1,000 from the family of Edmund Morris 
Fergusson, Jr., Class of 1920, who died at the College in his Senior year. The in- 
come only is to be used for the maintenance and increase of the Library's Depart- 
ment of English and American Literature. The books purchased with the income 
of this fund are marked by a special book-plate indicating its source Present book 
value, $965.80. 



CLASS OF 1888 LIBRARY FUND 

Founded Sixth Month 15, 1938, by gifts totaling $5,250 from members and 
families of the Class of 1888, on the occasion of their fiftieth anniversary. The con- 
ditions of the gift are as follows: 

(U A fund is to be established, to be known as "THE CLASS OF 1888 LIBRARY 
FUND." 

(2) The income only of this fund is to be used exclusively for the purchase of books 
for the Haverford College Library, except as noted below (in Clause 6). 

(3) The fund established now will be added to later by gift or bequest. 

(4) Members of the Class also expect to donate books to the Library, with the 
understanding that when such books are duplicates of books already in the 
Library, they may be exchanged for books needed, or sold, and the money 
so obtained used in the same way as the income of the fund. 

(5) All books purchased by the income of the fund (or obtained as in 4) are to 
be provided with a special book-plate to be furnished by the Class. 

(6) Income from the Class Fund or moneys obtained by sale of duplicate books 
may, when necessary, be used for binding or repair of books designated as 
belonging to the Class collection. In 1939-1940, additional donation of $500, 
and $100 in 1943-1944 was made. The present book value is $5,641.02. 

CLASS OF 1918 LIBRARY FUND 

Founded Third Month 24, 1938 by gift from the Class of 1918 in commemora- 
tion of their twentieth anniversity. The gift was $1,753.52 of which $500 was spent 
for a portrait of the late Rayner W. Kelsey, Professor of History, who died Tenth 
Month 29, 1934; and the balance of $1,253.52 was used in establishing a new Li- 
brary Fund, the income to be used for books. Present book value, $1,207.83. 



FUNDS FOR PENSIONS 

PRESIDENT SHARPLESS FUND 

Founded in 1907 by contributions from interested friends of the College, finally 
amounting to $40,000. Present book value, $39,733.67. The income is to be usec^ 
for the teachers and professors of Haverford College as the President of the Col- 
lege and his successors, with the approval of the Board of Managers, may decide. 
The income from this fund is annually transferred to the Haverford College Pen- 
sion Fund for old style pensions, or, if not needed for pensions, is capitalized in said 
fund. 



47 



WILLIAM P. HENSZEY FUND 

Founded in 1908 by gift of $10,000 from William P. Hens2ey, donated in con- 
nection with the raising of the President Sharpless Fund, but kept as a separate 
fund. Increased in 1909 by legacy of $25,000 from William P. Henszey. Present 
book value, $35,418.53. The income is to be used, as in the President Sharpless 
Fund, for the teachers and professors of Haverfurd College as the President of the 
College and his successors, with the approval of the Board of Managers, may de- 
cide. The income from this fund is annually transferred to the Haverford College 
Pension Fund for old style pensions, or, if not needed for pensions, is capitalized 
in said fund. 

JACOB P. JONES BENEFIT FUND 

Founded in 1909 and increased in 1910 by proceeds of land sold for account of 
Jacob P. Jones legacy. Present book value, $65,630.50. The income is to be used, 
as in the President Sharpless Fund, for the teachers and professors of Haverford 
College as the President of the College and his successors, with the approval of 
the Board of Managers, may decide. The income from this fund is annually trans- 
ferred to the Haverford College Pensioh Fund for old style pensions, or, if not 
needed for pensions, is capitalized in said fund. 

PLINY EARLE CHASE MEMORIAL FUND 

Founded in 1909 by transfer to the College of a fund raised in 1887 in memory 
of Professor Pliny Earle Chase, and amounting to par value of $4,173.04. Present 
book value, $3,152.93. The income of this fund is used, as in the President Sharp- 
less Fund, for the teachers and professors of Haverford College as the President 
of the College and his successors, with the approval of the Board of Managers, 
may decide. This income is transferred annually to the Haverford College Pen- 
sion Fund, for old style pensions, or, if not needed for pensions, is ( oitalized in 
said fund. 

HAVERFORD COLLEGE PENSION FUND 

Founded in 1920 and added to since, being accumulations of income from the 
President Sharpless Fund, the William P. Henszey Fund, the Jacob P. Jones 
Benefit Fund and the Pliny Earle Chase Memorial Fund, not needed for pensions. 
Present book value, $107,955.98. The income from this fund, together with the 
income from the four above-mentioned funds, is used for old style pensions. In- 
come not needed for pensions was capitalized until 1932; then any unused income 
was used toward the College's share in cost of new contributory pensions with the 
Teachers' Annuity and Insurance Association. Now the old style pensions call 
for more than the income of all these Pension Funds. When the proper time comes 
in an actuarial sense, the principal of this fund can be used as well as the income for 
the old style pensions until they cease. 

FUNDS FOR SPECIAL PURPOSES 

i THOMAS SHIPLEY FUND 

Founded in 1904 by gift of $5,000 from the late Samuel R. Shipley as a memorial 
to his father, Thomas Shipley. "Present book value, $5,056 68. The income only 
to be used for lectures on English Literature at the College. In case of actual need, 
at the discretion of the President of the College, the income can be used for general 
expenditures. 

ELLISTON P. MORRIS FUND 

Founded in 1906 by gift of $1,000 from Elliston P. Morris, '48. Present book 
value, $1,085.68. The income is to be used as a prize for essays to be written by 
students on the subject of Arbitration and Peace. "The Elliston P. Morris Prize" 
of $40 is given in each year, the competition being open to all undergraduates 
and to graduates of not more than three years' standing. 

In 1929, it was determined, with the consent of the family of Elliston P. Morris, 
that when the prize is not awarded the income may be used for the purchase of 
library books on arbitration and peace. 

48 



JOHN B. GARRETT READING PRIZE FUND 

Founded in 1908 by a gift of $2,000 par value of bonds by the late Tohn B. 
Garrett, '54. It was the purpose of the donor to ensure the permanence of a prize 
or prizes for Systematic Reading, which he had given for a number of years. The 
prizes were not awarded from 1922 to 1939 on account of default of the bonds. 
Reorganization has resulted in 1939 in sufficient recovery of value to provide 
again for this prize. Present book value $2,189.40. 

SPECIAL ENDOWMENT FUND 

Founded in 1909 by gift of $12,000 par value of bonds, book value $11,800, 
from an anonymous donor. Present book value, $8,890.67. The income only of 
this fund to be used "to furnish opportunity for study of social and economic and 
religious conditions and duties connected therewith, especially from a Chris- 
tian point of view." The income is used toward the expenses of Summer Schools for 
Religious Study, which have been held at Haverford and Swarthmore Colleges 
from time to time, and also for religious education under Friends' care. 

On Fifth Month 16, 1930, the Managers adopted the following amendment, 
made at the suggestion of the donor, now revealed to be John Thompson Emlen, 
1900: "If, however, it shall in the course of time be deemed advisable by the Presi- 
dent and the Managers that the income of this fund can be used more profitably 
by the College for other purposes than those herewith stated, it is my desire that 
they shall act in accordance with their judgment." 



SCHOLARSHIP IMPROVEMENT PRIZE FUND 

Founded in 1913 by gift of $2,000 par value of bonds, book value, $1,200, from 
John L. Scull, '05. Present book value, $2,213.14. The income only to be used to 
establish two prizes of $50 and $45 annually to the two students in the graduating 
class showing the most marked and steady improvement in scholarship during 
their college course. 



ELIZABETH P. SMITH FUND 

Founded in 1915 by bequest of $1,000 from Elizabeth P. Smith. Present book 
value, $1,680.48. The income only to be used as a prize for the best essays on 
Peace written by students of the College. 



S. P. LIPPINCOTT HISTORY PRIZE FUND 

Founded in 1917 by gift of $2,500 par value of bonds, book value, $2,546.88, 
from beneficiary of the estate of S. P. Lippincott, '86. Present book value, 
$2,454.02. The income only to be used as an annual history prize, which is 
designated "The S. P. Lippincott History Prize." The award is to be made 
on the basis of a competitive essay. In any year when no award is made, the 
income is to be used for the purchase of library books in the field of the 
unawarded prize. 

FRANCIS STOKES FUND 

Founded in 1919 by gift of $5,000 in securities, book value, $5,000, from 
Francis J. Stokes, '94, in memory of his father, Francis Stokes, of the Class of 
1852, and a Manager of Haverford from 1885 until his death in 1916. Present 
book value, $4,933.63. The income is to be used for extending the planting of 
trees and shrubs on the College grounds. The wish is expressed, but not as a bind- 
ing condition of the gift, that the Campus Club should have the direction of the 
expenditure of this income. 



49 



GEORGE PEIRCE PRIZE FUND 

Founded in 1919 by gift of $600, and increased in 1920 by further gift of KOO. 

from Harold and Charlotte C. Peirce in memory of their deceased son, George 
Peirce, '03. Present book value $2,195.95. The income only is to be used for a prize, 
to he called the George Peirce Prize in Chemistry or Mathematics, to the student 
who, m the opmion ot the hiculty, has shown marked proficiency in either or in 
both of these studies and who wishes to follow a profession which calls for such 
preparation. Unused income is capitalized, as requested by the founders of the fund. 



LYMAN BEECHER HALL PRIZE FUND 

Founded in 1924 by donation of securities of par value, $2,000, book value, 
$1,820, from the Class of 1898 in commemoration of their 25th anniversary of 
graduation to establish an annual prize of $100 in Chemistry in honor of Doctor 
Lyman Beecher Hall, Professor of Chemistry at Haverford College from 1880 to 
1917, Present book value, $2,076.43. 

NEWTON PRIZE FUND 

Founded in 1925 by donation of five shares of General Electric Co. stock by A. 
Edward Newton, par value, $500, and book value, $1,348.25. Present book value, 
$1,346.79. The income only is to be used for "The Newton Prize in English Litera- 
ture to the undergraduate who shall submit the best essay on some subject con- 
nected with English literature." In 1930, the award was changed to be on the basis 
of Final Honors, and in any year when no award is made the income is to be used 
for the purchase of library books in the field of the unawarded prize. 

EDWARD B. CONKLIN ATHELTIC FUND 

Founded in 1925 and added to in 1926, 1927 and 1929 by Frank H. Conklin, 
'95, in memory of his brother, Edward B. Conklin, '99. Present book value, 
$2,312.51. The income is to be used without restriction in any branch of athletics. 

ARBORETUM FUND 

Founded in 1928 by setting aside $5,000 from proceeds from sale of 5.811 acres 
of land on the southern boundary and southeast corner of the College farm. Until 
otherwise ordered by the Managers, the fund is to be invested and the income only 
is to be used under the direction of the Campus Club for trees and shrubs upon 
the College grounds, or for their care, or for other similar purposes. Present book 
value, $4,420.49. 

WILLIAM ELLIS SCULL PRIZE FUND 

Founded in 1929 by William Ellis Scull, '83, by a gift of $2,000. The income is 
to be used annually, so long as the Managers may judge expedient, as a prize to 
be awarded at Commencement by the Faculty to that upper classman who in 
their judgment shall have shown the greatest improvement in voice and the articu- 
lation of the English Language. The prize is to be known as "The William Ellis 
Scull Prize," Present book value, $1,927.09 

C. WHARTON STORK ART FUND 

In First Month, 1930, C. Wharton Stork, of Class of 1902, donated to the 
Corporation securities of a then value of $69,000 on account of a contemplated 
gift for the purpose of erecting, equipping, and furnishing an Art Museum at the 
College. Purchases were made by C. Wharton Stork of paintings, which are hung 
in the Library. This fund is to be liquidated and is not included in the total 
of the funds. 



50 



PAUL D. I. MAIER FUND 

Founded Tenth Month 7, 1936, b> bequest of $1,000 from Paul D. I. Maier, 
'96, of Byrn Mawr, Pa. The bequest provides for the continuance of the Class 
of 1896 Prizes of $10 each in Latin and Mathematics, and any balance of income 
is to be used for general purposes. Present book value, SQ6.v54. 

STRAWBRTDGE OBSERVATORY MAINTENANCE FUND 

Founded Second Month 13, 1937, from donations of $5,627.37 from members of 
the Strawbridge family, being the amount in excess of the actual cost of the re- 
building and reequipment of the William J. Strawbridge, '94, Memorial Astronom- 
ical Observatory. The income is used for the maintenance and equipment of 
the observatory. The principal can be used for additional equipment, if so deter- 
mined by the Board of Managers. In 1938 and 1939 an astrographic camera was 
so purchased at a cost of $1,787.83. Present book value$3,6s)y.55. 

JACOB AND EUGENIE BUCKY MEMORIAL FOUNDATION 

Founded Sixth Month 4, 1942 by gift of $2,000.00 from Colonial Trust Com- 
pany of New York and Solomon L. Fridenberg of Philadelphia, co-trustees under 
the will of Eugenie Bucky, deceased (late of New York), the income only to be 
used. At the same time accumulated income of $2,000.00 was also donated as 
Bucky Foundation Gift, this amount to be available for use for the same pur- 
poses as the income of the Foundation. Extracts from Mrs. Bucky's will and 
codicils in reference to the purposes of the Bucky Foundation are here made 
as follows: 

"The purpose or object of such a Foundation or Fund is and shall be for the 
encouragement of them who seek new truths, and who endea\'or to free and clear 
from mystery and confusion our knowledge concerning God'; and thereby to 
enforce more effectively the common laws of mutual love and obligation, peace 
and goodwill, between and among our several creeds, races, nations, and markets.* 

"Sly aim, intention, purpose and object is to help in promoting piety among 
men, enlightening their ignorance and bettering their condition, by making more 
and more extensive and by spreading among the public at large not only the 
preaching but also the practicing of the words of the . . . American motto 'In 
God We Trust' and of the . . . Preamble to the Constitution for the United States 
of America. I believe and therefore I aim, intend and purpose that the uplifting 
of men, women and children to the standard of life taught in the Scriptures and 
the Constitution for the United States of America is indeed the work of Charity, 
dispels ignorance, inculcates generous and patriotic sentiments, and fits the 
public groups and the individual men or women for their good usefulness in the 
American Commonwealth." 

1. Associated with the American motto "In God We Trust." 

2. Associated with the Preamble of the Constitution for the United States of 
America — "to form a more perfect union, establish justice, insure domestic 
tranquility, provide the common defense, promote the public welfare, and secure 
the l)les>ings ol lihertv to ourselves and our posteritv." Present book value, 
$2,089. 2.^. 

MATHEMATICS DEPARTMENT PRIZE FUND 

Founded May 20. 1943 from gifts totaling $900.00 of members of the Mathe- 
matics faculty and others. .A further gift of $125 was made in 1943-44. The unused 
income is added to principal. This capitalized the annual prizes that had been 
nivcii hy the Mathematics i)rofessors for many years. 

The Mathematics Dei)artment Prizes for freshmen. $25.00. are awarded annually, 
in c<impetition, by examination. Present book value, $1,051.60. 



51 



STATED MEETINGS OE THE CORPORATTOX 
AND THE MANAGERS 

The Annual Meeting of "The Corporation of Haverfard College" 
is held on the second Third-day in the Tenth Month, at 3 o'clock p.m. 



The Stated Meetings of the Managers for 1944-45 will be held 
on the second Sixth-day of First and Third Months, and on the third 
Sixth-day of Fifth, Ninth and Eleventh months. 



LEGACIES 

The friends of the College, including former students, and all who 
are interested in the promotion of sound learning, are invited to 
consider the College in the disposition of their estates by will. 



FORM OF BEQUEST OF PERSONAL PROPERTY 

/ give and bequeath, free and clear of all estate, inheritance or other 
similar taxes, unto the Corporation of Haverford College, the sum of 

Dollars. 



FORM OF DEVISE OF REAL ESTATE 

/ give and devise, free and clear of all estate, inheritance or other 
similar taxes, unto Tlie Corporation of Haverford College, its Suc- 
cessors and Assigns, in fee, the follozving described real estate: (Here 
describe the real estate.) 




HAVERFORD COLLEGE 



BULLETIN 



Vol. XLIII 



February, 1945 



No. 4 



CALENDAR 

Beginning of Summer Term June 25, 1945 

Last date for selection of Major Subjects by students who 

have been in attendance three terms July 23 

Last Summer Term Classes Aug. 24 

Senior comprehensive examinations* Aug. 22-24 

Commencement Day Aug. 25 



* At the option of mdividoal dqnirtments, comprehensive examinations may begin on August 21. 



Filtered as Second Class matter, November 2, 1944 at the Post 
Office at Hoverford, Pa. under the act of August 24, 1912. 



il 



SCHEDULE OF COURSES J 

Courses marked a or b are one-term courses; those marked (a) or (b) are 
respectively the first or second halves of two-term courses; those marked (a & b) 
are two-term courses; those marked s are one-term summer courses. 

Unless otherwise noted all classes meet five times a week (MTWTF). 

For further description of courses see Haverford College Catalog. 

Bib. Lit. la Intro. Old & New Testaments - 8:30 Sh. Mus. Mr. Flight 

Comparative Religion - 11:30 

General Botany - MWF - 1:05-4:00 



Bib. Lit. 6b 
Biology 2a 
Biology 4(a) 
Chemistry la 
Chemistry 3s 
Chemistry 4s 
Chemistry 6s 
English la 
English 12a 



Sh. Mus, Mr. Flight 
Sh. 35 Mr. Henry 



Local Flora - T.Th. - 11:30 

Lab. to be arranged 
Intro. General Chemistry - 9:30 

Lab. T.Th. 1:30-3:30 
Qualitative Analysis - 11:30 

Lab. F. 1:30-5:30 
Quantitative Analysis - 10:30 M.W.F. C.L 

Lab. M.T. 1:05-5:30 
Organic Chemistry - TWTF - 8:30 

Lab. W. - 1:05-5:30 
Methods and Techniques - 11:30 

Contemporary Drama - 9:30 



French 2(a& b) Intermediate French - 9:30, 10:30, 1:30 

Rom. L£ 
Intermediate German - 8:30 

1 hr. to be arranged 
Roman History - 10:30 



German 2(a) 
History 14b 
Math. 1(a) 
Math. 1(b) 
Philosophy 6b 



Freshman Math. - MTWTFS - 8:30 
Freshman Math. - MTWTFS - 9:30 
Main Problems of Phil. - 10:30 

Philosophy 21a Advanced Philosophy - 8:30 

Physics 1(a) 

Physics 8b 



Introductory Physics - 10:30 

Lab. M. W. 1:05-3:00 
Intermediate Radio - TWTF - 11:30 
Lab. T.Th. 1:05-3:00 
Psychology 1(a) Elementary Psychology - 9:30 

Lab. to be arranged 
Psychology 1(b) Elementary Psychology - 

Hours to be arranged 
Spanish l(a & b) Elementary Spanish - 9:30, 10:30, 1:30 W.M.R. Mrs. Asensio 



Sh. 35 


Mr. 


Henry 


C.L. 


Mr. 


Cadbury 


C.L. 


Mr. 


Cadbury 


C.L. 


Mr. 


Meldrum 


C.L. 


Mr. 


Meldnim 


Rob. 


Mr. 


Snyder 


W. 1 


Mr. 


Snyder 


ing. Off. 
W. 1 

W. 1 


Mr. 
Mr. 
Mr. 
Mr. 


Wylie 
Kelly and 
Pfund 
Comfort 


E.M.R. 


Mr. 


Oakley 


E.M.R. 


Mr. 


Oakley 


E.M.R. 


Mr. 


Foss 


W.M.R. 


Mr. 


Foss 


Sh. 16 
Sh. 2 


Mr. 

Mr. 
Mr. 


Benham & 

Pepinsky 

Benham 


Sh. 18 


Mr. 


Pepinsky 


— 


Mr. 


Pepinsky 



Ui 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

Classes begin on Monday, June 25th, the first classes at 8:30 a.m. It Is 
therefore necessary for all new men to get settled and arrange their schedules 
on Saturday and Sunday, June 23 rd and 24th. 

1. New men should come first to Roberts Hall, where they will find the lo- 
cation of their dormitory rooms. 

2. Either before they take their baggage to their rooms, or as soon after 
as possible, they must make out their schedules for the term in the Office of the 
Dean, second floor, Roberts Hall. 

3. At the same time new men must sign the College Register, which will 
be in the Office of the Dean on Saturday and Sunday. 

There will be a meeting of all new men on 
Sunday, June 24th, at 7:00 p.m. in the 
auditorium of Roberts Hall. 



Schedules filed before May 31st by students who intended to return at that 
time should be checked against the revised Schedule of Courses, and individual 
schedules must be correct and complete by Saturday, June 30th, at noon. 

The attention of all students is called to the announcement concerning 
Physical Education posted on the bulletin board in Roberts Hall. Following his 
registration with the Physical Education Department each student must note on 
his schedule the type of physical education he is to undertake and the time of the 
appointments he is to attend. 

It is required by law that Ration Book #4 be deposited with the College for 
all students and members of the Faculty who eat eight or more meals a week in 
the College dining room. Ration Book #4 may be handed in at the Superintendent's 
Office (Founders East Basement) or in the dining room. Any student or member 
of the Faculty whose book is not deposited by noon on Monday, July 2nd, may be 
excluded from the dining room. 



MEALS: Meals for students in residence will begin on Saturday, June 23rd, at 
lunch. Meal hours for the summer term are as follows: 

Week Days Sundays 

Breakfast 7:45-8:05 8:00 - 8:20 

Lunch 12:20-12:40 1:00 - 1:20 

Dinner 6:00-6:20 6:00 - 6:20 

BOOKS: For the summer term there will be no agent on the campus for E. S. 
McCawley & Co., Inc., 17 Station Road, Haverford, agent for all textbooks. Students 
will be expected to get their books at the bookstore, when texts are specified in 
class by instructors or by announcement on the bulletin board in Roberts Hall. 



Iv 

JFURNITURE: The College supplies bed, dresser, study table, desk chair and desk 
lamp. This last, with keys to closets, may be obtained from the Office of the 
Superintendent. 

Additional furniture for dormitory rooms can be obtained from 
Lyle Settle, 21b Founders, or Judson Ihrig, 36 Lloyd. They have a fairly large 
supply of desks, etc., which will be on sale in the basement of Center Barclay on 
Saturday, June 23 rd, from 9 to 12 and from 1 to 5, and on Sunday, June 24th, from 
2 to 6. 

ATTENDANCE AT CLASSES AND OTHER COLLEGE EXERCISES: The Faculty, 
by unanimous vote of April 23, 1942, ruled that during the summer term there 
will be no allowed absences from classes. Students are therefore expected to 
attend all classes. The matter of absence from class is to be settled between the 
instructor and the student. If results satisfactory to the instructor are not ob- 
tained, the Acting Dean should be notified at once. 

Meeting will be held on Thursdays at 5:00 p.m. Attendance is required of 
all students. One absence will be allowed between June 27th and July 27th, and 
one absence between August 1st and August 24th. 

Collections and other scheduled College exercises will be announced from 
time to time. Attendance will be required at such functions. 

CONSULT BULLETIN BOARDS AT FOUNDERS HALL AND ROBERTS HALL 
DAILY. 



I 



SUMMER 1945 
DIRECTORY 

FACULTY AND STAFF 



Name 



Allendoerfer, Carl B.* 
Asensio, Mrs.Manuel J. 
Benham, T. A. 
Cadbury, William E., Jr. 
Caseili, Aldo 
Comfort, Howard 
Comfort, William W. 
Cooper, Bennett S. 
Drake, Thomas E.* 
Dimn, Emmett R.* 
Evans, Arlington* 

Evans, Francis Cope 
Fetter, Frank W.* 
FitzGerald, Alan S. 

Flight, John W. 
Foss, Martin 
Green, Louis C* 
Haddleton, A. W. 
Henry, Howard K. 
Herndon, John G.* 
Hetzel, Theodore B.* 
Holmes, Clayton W.* 
Jones, Rufus 
Kelly, John A. 
Klatt, Mrs. Mabel H. 
Lockwood, Dean P. 
Lunt, William E.* 
Macintosh, Archibald 
Meldrum, William B. 
Misdall, Eloise 
Morley, Felix* 
Oakley, Cletus O. 
Palmer, Frederick, Jr. 
Pepinsky, Abe 
Pfund, Harry W. 
Post, Amy L. 
Post, L. Arnold 
Rantz, J. Otto* 
Rittenhouse, Leon H. 
Sargent, Ralph M.* 
Snyder, Edward D. 
Steere, Douglas V.* 
Stinnes, Edmund H.* 



Address 






Haverford, unless 






otherwise noted 


Telephone 


750 Rugby Road, Bryn Mawr 


B.M. 


2568 J 


2 College Lane 


Ard. 


4163 


3 College Lane 


Ard. 


6044 


791 College Avenue 


Ard. 


0203 W 


Merion Hall, Haverford College 


Ard. 


5562 


5 College Circle 


Ard. 


3732 


South Walton Road 


Ard. 


0455 


61 Carlton Avenue, Trenton, N.J. 


Trenton 3-5938 


702 Pennstone Road, Bryn Mawr 


B.M. 


1534 


748 Rugby Road, Bryn Mawr 






324 Boulevard, Brookline, 






Upper Darby 


Hilltop 


2043 


1 College Lane 


Ard. 


4049 W 


5 Canterbury Lane, St. Davids 


Wayne 


2449 J 


Warick Road and Cotswold Lane, 






Wynnewood 


Ard. 


1404 


753 College Avenue 


Ard. 


4409 W 


la College Lane 


Ard. 


1599 


791 College Avenue 


Ard. 


4409 J 


29 Tenmore Road 


B.M. 


1235 W 


1464 Drayton Lane, Penn Wynne 


Ard. 


3913 J 


1 College Lane 


Ard. 


0364 


768 College Avenue 


Ard. 


4393 W 


720 Millbrook Lane 


Ard. 


4269 W 


2 College Circle 


Ard. 


2777 


3 College Lane 


Ard. 


4160 


Foimders Hall, Haverford College 


Ard. 


9533 


6 College Circle 


Ard. 


1402 J 


5 College Lane 


Ard. 


1507 W 


3 College Circle 


Ard. 


0961 


747 College Avenue 


Ard. 


0881 J 


Montrose Avenue, Rosemont 


B.M. 


0775 


1 College Circle 


Ard. 


4712 


Featherbed Lane 


Ard. 


3109 W 


1 College Lane 


Ard. 


6878 


7 College Lane 


Ard. 


5324 


624 Overhill Road, Ardmore 


Ard. 


5532 


C-3 Dreycott Apts. 


Ard. 


1643 M 


9 College Lane 


Ard. 


0258 M 


2122 Chestnut Avenue, Ardmore 






6 College Lane 


Ard. 


5522 


4 College Circle 


Ard. 


3339 


36 Railroad Avenue 


Ard. 


0712 


739 College Avenue 


Ard. 


0162 


751 Millbrook Lane 


Ard. 


6759 



Name 
Sutton, Richard M.* 

Swan, Alfred* 

Taylor, Dr. Herbert W. 
Teaf, Howard M., Jr.* 
Watson, Frank D.* 
Williamson, Alexander, J.* 
Wilson, Albert H. 
Wylle, Laurence W. 



Address 

Haverford, unless 

otherwise noted 

785 College Avenue, facing 

Walton Road 

c/o H, Pfund, 624 Overhill Road, 

Ardmore 

457 Lancaster Avenue 

3 College Lane 
773 College Avenue 

4 College Lane 
765 College Avenue 
Government House, Haverford 
College 



Telephone 



Ard. 0742 W 

Ard. 5532 
Ard. 2383 
Ard. 4049 J 
Ard. 2937 
Ard. 4023 
Ard. 1853 

Ard. 9461 



* Indicates absence during summer term. 



COLLEGE TELEPHONE SERVICE 

When there is an operator at the switchboard (9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday 
through Friday, 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. on Saturday, none Simday) any of the offices 
listed below can be reached by calling Ardmore 6400. 

When there is no operator on duty, use the following telephone numbers: 

Ardmore 0767 Haverford Library; Maintenance & Operation Office 

Ardmore 0221 Acting Dean; Comptroller 

Ardmore 0763 Hilles Laboratory; Physics Laboratory 

Ardmore 3036 Infirmary 

Ardmore 3761 President's Office 



i 



FACULTY OFFICE TELEPHONES 

The office of each of the following members of the Faculty may be reached 
by calling Ar&more 6400 only during the hours when there is an operator at the 
switchboard. 



Benham 


Flight 


Kelly 


Pepinsky 


Cadbui7 


Foss 


Lockwood 


Pfund 


Comfort, H. 


Haddleton 


Meldrum 


Snyder 


Evans, F. C. 


Henry 


Oakley 


Wylle 



COLLEGE OFFICE AND BUILDING TELEPHONES 

Unless otherwise noted, all telephones below may be reached 
[ by calling Ardmore 6400 

Acting President, Archibald Macintosh 
Admissions, Archibald Macintosh, Director 
Aliunni Office, Bennett S. Cooper, Secretary 
Assistant to the President, Bennett S. Cooper 

Barclay HaU, North (Pay Station) 9506 

Barclay Hall, Center (Pay Station) 9459 

Barclay Hall, South (Pay Station) 9508 

Biology Laboratory (Sharpless Hall) 
Business Office, Aldo Caselli, Comptroller 
Chemistry Laboratory 

Dean's O^ice, Francis C. Evans, Acting Dean 
Dietitian, Mrs. Mabel H. Klatt 
Engineering Laboratory (Hilles) 

Founders Hall, East (Pay Station) 9460 

Founders Hall, Dormitory (Pay Station) 9533 

French Department Office 

Qovernment House, 8 College Lane (Pay Station) 9613 

Gymnasium (Pay Station) 9512 

Gymnasium Office 

Haverford News 4894 

Haverford Review, Bennett S. Cooper, Managing Editor 
Hilles Laboratory of Applied Science (Engineering) 
infirmary, Mabel S. Beard, R.N. 

Kitchen (Pay Station) 9544 

Language House, Manuel J. Asensio, Director (Pay Station) 9428 

Library: D.P. Lockwood, Librarian 

Amy L. Post, Assistant Librarian 

Circulation Desk 

Anna B. Hewitt (Treasure Room) 

Lloyd Hall, 3rd Entry (Kinsey) Rooms 1-12 (Pay Station) 9520 

Lloyd Hall, 5th Entry (Strawbridge) Rooms 13-26 (Pay Station) 9514 

Lloyd Hall, 8th Entry (Leeds) Rooms 27-38 (Pay Station) 9628 

Maintenance and Operation Office 

Merion Hall 9458 

Observatory 

Physics Laboratory (Sharpless Hall) 

Power House (Pay Station) 9540 

Registrar, Elolse Mlsdall 

Research Laboratory, Alan S. FitzGerald, Director 5092 

Romance Language Department Office 

Sharpless HalU T. A. Benham, H. Comfort, F. C. Evans, H. K. Henry, 

A. Peplnsky, R. M. Sutton 
Whltall Hall: J. W. Flight, J. A. Kelly, H. W. Pfund, E. D. Snyder 



DIRECTORY 

STUDENTS IN THE COLLEGE 

In the last column is given the number of the student's dormitory room; F 
for Founders Hall, L for Lloyd Hall. The figure following the name indicates the 
number of the term now being completed. Day students' home telephones are 
listed beneath their addresses. 

Division into undergraduate terms will be found in Part Two. 

PART ONE 

(Alphabetically Arranged) 

Name Home Address 

ADAMS, James Fowler, Jr., 5 

2900 Harrison Street, Wilmington 270, Del. 
ALENICK, Monroe Edward, 4 

292 Eastern Parkway, Newark 6, N.J, 

BALDI, Virgil Bismarck, Jr., 1 

437 W. School Lane, Germantown, Phila.,Pa, 
BARKER, William Pierson, II, 4 

1553 Shorb Avenue, N.W., Canton 3, Ohio 
BELL, William Warren, 4 

4409 Greenwich Parkway, N.W., Washington 7, D.C. 
BESSE, Byron Earl, 3 

823 Old Gulph Road, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 
BIRDSALL, Joseph Cooper, Jr., 3 

139 Booth Lane, Haverford, Pa. 
BLECKER, Solomon, 4 

5022 N. 10th Street, Philadelphia 41, Pa. 
BOUZARTH, William Francis, II, 4 

635 Belair Avenue, Aberdeen, Md. 
BRIEGER, Henry A. N., 2 

58 N. Lansdowne Avenue, Lansdowne, Pa. 

CHARTENER, William Huston, 8 

2716 Bailey Avenue, Buffalo 15, N.Y. 
COUCH, Richard Arden, 1 

601 Clearview Avenue, Pittsburgh 5, Pa. 

DALLETT, Francis James, Jr., 1 Day 

324 Overhill Road, Wayne, Pa. 

Wayne 2392 
DA VIES, David Elwyn . 1 31 L 

3012 - 44th Street, N.W., Washington, D.C. 
DORN, Richard Kenneth, 3 17 L 

6140 Nassau Road, Philadelphia, Pa. 
DVORKEN, Henry Jacob, 1 13 F 

435 W. Fifth Avenue, Roselle, N.J. 

EDGERTON, Robert, 1 10 L 

College Avenue, Haverford, Pa. 
EXTON, Fred, 1 12 L 

4519 Davenport Street, N.W., Washington, D.C. 



College Address 


29 L 


37 L 


26 L 


21 L 


25 L 


Day 


20 L 


36 L 


22 L 


15 F 


3 L 


35 L 



Name Home Address 

FALTERMAYER, Edmund Kase, 1 

46 E. Gowen Avenue, Mt. Airy, Phila., Pa. 
FREEMAN, Murray Fox, 4 

324 N. Bowman Avenue, Merion, Pa. 

Merion 1198 

GARDNER, Kenneth Adelman, 1 

2214 Forest Glen Road, Pittsburgh 17, Pa. 
GARRETT, Philip Cresson, 2nd, 1 

Lincoln Highway, Malvern, Pa, 

Malvern 2646 W 
GEBHARDT, John Frank, 1 

140 E. 29th Street, Erie, Pa. 
GOODMAN, I. Robert, 1 

3749 Nortonia Road, Baltimore 16, Md. 
GOTHBERG, George August, Jr., 1 

15915 Fernway Road, Shaker Heights, Ohio 
GOULD, Stanley Benton, 1 

3505 Edgewood Road, Baltimore, Md. 
GROSS, Sheldon Harley, 8 

Quarters 15A, Fort Myer, Va. 

HAMILTON, Richard Truitt, 5 

Rosslyn Farms, Carnegie, Pa. 
HAMMOND, Stanley G., 1 

104 Park Road, Llanerch, Pa. 

Hilltop 0185 J 
HARRIS, William Hamilton, 4 

204 N. 17th Street, Camp Hill, Pa. 
HASTINGS, James Babbitt, 1 

30 Elston Road, Upper Montclair, N.J. 
HAZELWOOD, Robert Nichols, 1 

3405 N. Hackett Avenue, Milwaukee 11, Wis. 
HIGINBOTHOM, William C, 2 

5403 Springlake Way, Baltimore, Md. 
HOSKINS, Robert Graham, 1 

86 Varick Road, Waban 68, Mass. 

IHRIG, Judson LaMoure, 3 36 L 

2611 E. Beverly Road, Milwaukee 11, Wis. 

JACKSON, John Albert, 1 30 F 

20 Summer Street, Adams, Mass. 
JOHNSTON, Robert J., Jr., 1 Day 

Woodside Cottage, Haverford College, Haverford, Pa. 

Ardmore 3725 

KATCHEN, Julius, 7 38 L 

2 Hollywood Avenue, West Long Branch, N.J. 
KELLEY, Jean (Miss), Special Student Day 

Woodside Cottage, Haverford College, Haverford, Pa. 

Ardmore 3725 
KINDLER, Don, 3 18 L 

Jessups, Md. <. 



5 


College Address 


9 L 


Day 


13 L 


Day 


9 L 


11 L 


8 L 


11 L 


33 L 


2 L 


Day 


34 L 


26 L 


8L 


28 L 


31 L 



6 

Name Home Address 

LAMBERT, Richard Meredith, 1 

104 Webster Avenue, Wyncote, Pa. 
LE VINSON, Henry W., 2 

4724 Sansom Street, Philadelphia 39, Pa. 
LIBBY, Edward Kelway, 1 

1324 Euclid Street, N.W., Washington 9, D.C. 

MEAD, Brian, Jr., 4 

II Horseguard Lane, Scarsdale, N.Y. 
MEYERS, Robert Weigel, 5 

132 W. 9th Street, Erie, Pa. 
MILLER, Bruce Marten, 4 

c/o Ward, 1608 Upshur, N.W., Washington, D.C. 
MOSES, Charles Henry Mann, Jr., 6 

433 Haverford Road, Wynnewood, Pa. 

Ardmore 4396 

OLIVIER, Daniel Dretzka, 3 

Box 306, R.D. 2, Phoenixville, Pa. 
OPPENHEIMER, Martin J., 4 

3506 Bancroft Road, Baltimore 15, Md. 
OSWALD, David Statton, 3 

826 The Terrace, Hagerstown, Md. 

PARKE, Robert, Jr., 1 

50 Lancaster Avenue, Buffalo 9, N.Y. 
PAYRO, Robert Pablo, 7 

Lavalle 357, Buenos Aires, Argentina 
PETERS, David Alexander, 4 

45 N. 11th Street, AUentown, Pa. 

QUEK, Soo Tong, 1 12 L 

(c/o Mrs. C.L.Hsia), 115 W.73rd St., New York City 

REYNOLDS, James Conrad, 1 16 L 

208 W. State Street, Kennett Square, Pa. 
RICHIE, Douglas Hooten, 1 22 F 

8 N. Main Street, Brewster, N.Y. 
ROCHE, Robert Pearson, 7 1 L 

III - 7th Street, Garden City, N.Y. 

ROGERS, Alan Spencer, 6 Day 

1320 DeKalb Street, Norristown, Pa. 

Norristown 2757 M 
RUFF, George Elson, Jr., 1 15 L 

7358 Rural Lane, Philadelphia 19, Pa. 

SANDERS, Martin, 6 4 L 

55 Clinton Place, Bronx, New York, N.Y. 
SETTLE, Lyle G., 4 21b F 

Dryden, N.Y. 
SHEPARD, Royal Francis, Jr., 1 15 L 

128 N. Mountain Avenue, Montclair, N.J. 
STONE, John Alexander, 3 3 F 

319 W. 88th Street, Apartment 8, New York, N.Y. 
SWARTLEY, William M., 2 25 L 

Woodland Drive, Lansdale, Pa. 



-ollege Address 


22 F 


17 L 


10 L 


34 L 


4 L 


30 L 


Day 


7 F 


19 L 


18 L 


30 F 


3 L 


23 L 



Name Home Address 

THOMAS, David Edward, 3 

518 Foss Avenue, Drexel Hill, Pa. 
THOMPSON, Daniel Bard, 5 

UQ S. Broad Street, Waynesboro, Pa. 
TYCHANICH, John Dimitri, 1 

53 Balmforth Avenue, Danbury, Conn. 

WERNTZ, Donald R., Special Student 

1535 Louden Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
WHITEHEAD, H. Macy, 7 

R.D. #1, South Windham, Maine 
WILCOX, John Rogers, 1 

127 South West Street, Allentown, Pa. 
WRIGHT, Theodore Craig, 1 n 

107 Lee Avenue, Trenton, N.J. 

ZWEIFLER, Nathan Joseph, 4 22 L 

46 Wilbur Avenue, Newark 8, N.J. 





7 


College Address 


19 L 




21 L 




13 L 




7 L 




1 F 




16 L 




35 L 





PART TWO 



Chartener 



8th Term (2) 
3 L Gross 



33 L 



7th Term (4) 

Katchen 38 L Roche . . . 

Payro 3 L Whitehead 

6th Term (3) 

Moses Day Sanders . , 

Rogers Day 



5th Term (4) 



Adams 29 

Hamilton 2 



.4th Term (13) 



Alenick 37 L 

Barker 21 L 

Bell 25 L 

Blecker 36 L 

Bouzarth 22 L 

Freeman Day 

Harris 34 L 



3rd Term (9) 



Besse Day 

Birdsall 20 L 

Dorn 17 L 

Ihrig 36 L 

Kindler 18 L 



2nd Term (4) 



Brieger 15 F 

Higinbothom 28 L 



1st Term (31) 



4 L 



L Meyers 4 L 

L Thompson 21 L 



Mead 34 L 

Miller 30 L 

Oppenheimer 19L 

Peters 23 L 

Settle 21b F 

Zweifler 22 L 



Olivier. . ., 7 F 

Oswald 18 L 

Stone 3 F 

Thomas 19 L 



Levinson 17 L 

Swartley 25 L 



Baldi 26 L 

Couch 35 L 

Dallett Day 

Davies 31 L 

Dvorken 13 F 

Edgerton 10 L 

Exton 12 L 

Faltermayer 9 L 

Gardner 13 L 

Garrett Day 

Gebhardt 9 L 

Goodman IIL 

Gothberg 8 L 

Gould 11 L 

Hammond Day 

Hastings 26 L 



Hazelwood 8 L 

Hoskins 31 L 

Jackson 30 F 

Johnston Day 

Lambert 22 F 

Libby 10 L 

Parke 30 F 

Quek 12 L 

Reynolds 16 L 

Richie 22 F 

Ruff 15 L 

Shepard 15 L 

Tychanich 13 L 

Wilcox 16 L 

Wright 35 L 



Kelley 



Special Students (2) 
Day Werntz 



7 L